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Things to do this week in NYC Dec 19-Dec 26: Museums
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December 19, 2009 - by CG Directory Editor

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Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

New Photography 2009 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 01, 2010 -

New Photography 2009 is a thematic presentation of significant recent work in photography that examines and expands the conventional definitions of the medium. Although the six artists in this installation -- Walead Beshty, Daniel Gordon, Leslie Hewitt, Carter Mull, Sterling Ruby, and Sara VanDerBeek -- represent diverse points of view, working methods, and pictorial modes ranging from abstract to representational, their images all begin in the studio or the darkroom and result from processes involving collection, assembly, and manipulation. Many of the works are made with everyday materials and objects, as well as images from the Internet, magazines, newspapers, and books. Some of the artists also work in other mediums and their pictures relate to disciplines such as drawing, sculpture, and installation. As traditional photographic techniques are being quickly replaced by digital technologies, the artists included here examine the process and structure of making photographs.

Looking In: Robert Frank's The Americans - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 03, 2010 - Manhattan

This exhibition celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of The Americans, Robert Frank's influential suite of black-and-white photographs made on a cross-country road trip in 1955-56. Although Frank's depiction of American life was criticized when the book was released in the U.S. in 1959, it soon became recognized as a masterpiece of street photography. Born in Switzerland in 1924, Frank is considered one of the great living masters of photography. The exhibition will feature all 83 photographs published in The Americans and will be the first time that this body of work is presented to a New York audience. In addition, the exhibition includes contact sheets that Frank used to create the book; earlier photographs made in Europe, Peru, and New York; a short film by the artist on his life; and his later re-use of iconic images from the series.

Rococo and Revolution: Eighteenth-Century French Drawings - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 03, 2010 -

Featuring more than eighty exceptional drawings almost exclusively from the Morgan's renowned holdings. The efflorescence of the ancien regime and its eventual downfall provide the backdrop to a century of remarkable artistic vitality and variety that subtly chronicles the many changes taking place in eighteenth-century France. Artists represented in the exhibition include Antoine Watteau, Jacques-Louis David, Francois Boucher, Jean-Honore Fragonard, Claude Gillot, Nicolas Lancret, Hubert Robert, Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, Anne-Louis Girodet, and Pierre-Narcisse Guerin, among others.

The Erotic Object: Surrealist Sculpture from the Collection - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 04, 2010 -

Surrealist artists, writers, and poets placed persistent emphasis on the power of the imagination to transform the everyday. Beginning in the early 1930s, the production of elliptically erotic, sexually charged objects and sculptures became central to their concerns. This exhibition features some of the most notorious works, including Salvador Dalí's bread-and-inkwell-crowned Retrospective Bust of a Woman (1933) and Meret Oppenheim's fur-lined teacup (1936).

Paired, Gold: Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Roni Horn - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 06, 2010 -

The aesthetic dialogue between Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Roni Horn is embodied in an exchange of gold, a reciprocal gift between two artists that resonates with the poetry of their respective projects. In 1990 during Horn's solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Gonzalez-Torres encountered her sculpture Forms from the Gold Field (1980-82), two pounds of pure gold compressed into a luminous rectangular mat. Set directly on the floor in an otherwise empty gallery, the work threatens to dissolve into dazzling immateriality, the sense of pure surface that its delicacy invokes. Impressed by its radical simplicity and emotive capabilities, Gonzalez-Torres shared his memory of the work with Horn when they met in 1993. A few days later, she sent him a square of gold foil as a symbol of their newfound friendship and shared sensibilities. He was so inspired by her gesture and the expansiveness of her subtle work that he fashioned his own "gold field" in her honor: "Untitled" (Placebo – Landscape – for Roni) (1993), an endlessly replaceable candy spill of gold cellophane–wrapped sweets. Having described Horn's Gold Field in his essay "1990: L.A, 'The Gold Field'" from Earths Grow Thick: Roni Horn, as "a new landscape, a possible horizon, a place of rest and absolute beauty," Gonzalez-Torres created a gleaming, topographical sculpture that, in the spirit of his work, is always free for the taking.

Lincoln Center: Celebrating 50 Years - New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
Through January 06, 2010 -

The first exhibition to focus exclusively on the evolution and influence of America's first performing arts center features an extensive collection of historic and contemporary objects including photographs, ephemera, correspondence, costumes, set pieces, props and video recordings.

Intervals: Kitty Kraus - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 06, 2010 -

Kitty Kraus (b. 1976, Heidelberg, Germany) has been invited to exhibit her work for the second installment of Intervals, a new contemporary art series designed to showcase experimental projects by emerging artists. Kraus works in a spare, elegiac vocabulary of monochrome forms and humble materials such as light bulbs, mirrors, ice, and cloth. While her sculptural installations at first recall the cool, geometric precision of Minimalist art, they possess an internal volatility that can prompt their gradual fragmentation or sudden collapse. The spirit of her practice is thus more aligned with the focus on process and alchemic transformation associated with Post-Minimalism, such as the Arte Povera movement of the late 1960s or the work of Joseph Beuys and Robert Smithson. The trajectory of dissolution at the heart of Kraus's work is encapsulated in her series of bulbs or microphones encased in blocks of frozen ink, in which the heat from the embedded electronic device gradually melts the ice, leaving only a residue of murky liquid pooled on the floor or trailing the gallery walls. Likewise, her sculptures constructed from bulbs enclosed in mirrored glass boxes, in which slivers of light seep through incised edges to envelop the gallery space in delicate projected patterns are sometimes calibrated so that the heat from the light source eventually shatters the casing. As a young artist defining her career at the beginning of the 21st century -- a time of profound questioning and global crises -- Kraus rehearses the trend towards degradation and chaos known as entropy, finding a mournful beauty in the literal and symbolic failure of form.

Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Creche - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2010 - Manhattan

The Met continues a long-standing holiday tradition with the annual presentation of its Christmas tree, a favorite of New Yorkers and visitors from around the world. A vivid eighteenth-century Neapolitan Nativity scene -- embellished with a profuse array of diminutive, lifelike attendant figures and silk-robed angels hovering above -- will adorn the candlelit spruce. Recorded music and lighting ceremonies will add to the enjoyment of the holiday display.

Eccentric Visions: The Worlds of Luo Ping (1733-1799) - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 10, 2010 - Manhattan

Luo Ping was one of the most versatile, original, and celebrated artists in eighteenth-century China. The youngest of the so-called Eight Eccentrics of Yangzhou, he was a fiercely independent artist whose works -- including portraits, landscapes, and flower paintings -- deeply influenced the course of later Chinese painting. Organized by the Museum Rietberg, Zurich, the exhibition, which consists of 37 paintings by Luo Ping, members of his family, and his mentor Jin Nong, is drawn primarily from leading museums in China and will feature a number of National Treasures that have never been shown in the West. In New York it will be complemented by about a dozen works from the Museum's collection and from several local private lenders.

Watteau to Degas: French Drawings from the Frits Lugt Collection - Frick Collection
Through January 10, 2010 -

Selected by the curators of The Frick Collection, this exhibition of more than sixty works will include drawings and watercolors by well-known masters of the French School, including Jean-Antoine Watteau, François Boucher, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Jacques-Louis David, Eugène Delacroix, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, and Edgar Degas, as well as important figures who are less familiar to the general public.

Art of the Samurai: Japanese Arms and Armor, 1156-1868 - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 10, 2010 - Manhattan

The first comprehensive exhibition devoted to the arts of the samurai. Arms and armor will be the principal focus, bringing together the finest examples of armor, swords and sword mountings, archery equipment and firearms, equestrian equipment, banners, surcoats, and related accessories of rank such as fans and batons. Drawn entirely from public and private collections in Japan, the majority of objects date from the rise of the samurai in the late Heian period, ca. 1156, through the early modern Edo period, ending in 1868, when samurai culture was abolished. The martial skills and daily life of the samurai, their governing lords, the daimyo, and the ruling shoguns will also be evoked through the presence of painted scrolls and screens depicting battles and martial sports, castles, and portraits of individual warriors. The exhibition will conclude with a related exhibition documenting the recent restoration in Japan of a selection of arms and armor from the Metropolitan Museum's permanent collection. This will be the first exhibition ever devoted to the subject of Japanese arms and armor conservation.

Kandinsky - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 13, 2010 -

This exhibition draws from the three largest public holdings of the artist's work -- that of the Guggenheim Museum; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the Stadtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich -- as well as renowned institutions and private collections to bring together nearly one hundred paintings dating from 1907 to 1942. Complemented by more than sixty works on paper from the collections of the Guggenheim and the Hilla von Rebay Foundations, this retrospective retraces the painter's oeuvre, focusing on key events that informed his life and work.

Kandinsky - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 13, 2010 -

This exhibition draws from the three largest public holdings of the artist's work -- that of the Guggenheim Museum; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the Stadtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich -- as well as renowned institutions and private collections to bring together nearly one hundred paintings dating from 1907 to 1942. Complemented by more than sixty works on paper from the collections of the Guggenheim and the Hilla von Rebay Foundations, this retrospective retraces the painter's oeuvre, focusing on key events that informed his life and work.

Gabriele Munter and Vasily Kandinsky, 1902–14: A Life in Photographs - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 13, 2010 -

This exhibition presents German artist Gabriele Munter's photographs along with a selection taken by her companion Vasily Kandinsky, recording the years they lived, traveled, and worked together between 1902 and 1914.

Serizawa: Master of Japanese Textile Design - Japan Society
Through January 17, 2010 -

Living National Treasure Serizawa Keisuke (1895-1984) used stencil-dyeing techniques to create irresistible works of art that range from screens and kimonos to book covers and magazine designs. The combination of Serizawa's originality and vitality with the natural beauty of his materials -- cotton, silk, hemp, and other fibers decorated with the brilliant yet warm hues of natural dyes -- will make this show an unmissable visual feast.

James Tissot: 'The Life of Christ' - Brooklyn Museum
Through January 17, 2010 - Brooklyn

This exhibition includes 124 watercolors selected from a set of 350 that depict detailed scenes from the New Testament, from before the birth of Jesus through the Resurrection, in a chronological narrative. It marks the first time in more than twenty years that any of the Tissot watercolors, a pivotal acquisition that entered the collection in 1900, have been on view at the Brooklyn Museum.

Georgia O'Keeffe: Abstraction - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through January 17, 2010 - Manhattan

The exhibition includes more than 125 paintings, drawings, watercolors, and sculptures by O'Keeffe as well as selected examples of Alfred Stieglitz's famous photographic portrait series of O'Keeffe.

American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765-1915 - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 24, 2010 - Manhattan

This exhibition presents tales artists told between the American Revolution and World War I about their times and examines how their accounts reflect shifting professional standards, opportunities for study, foreign prototypes, venues for display, and viewers' expectations. Artists include John Singleton Copley, Charles Willson Peale, William Sidney Mount, George Caleb Bingham, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassatt, William Merritt Chase, John Sloan, and George Bellows.

Tobi Kahn - Sacred Spaces for the 21st Century - Museum of Biblical Art
Through January 24, 2010 -

This exhibition brings together recent projects by New York City artist Tobi Kahn (chief among them Congregation Emanu-El B'ne Jeshurun; Milwaukee, WI, 2008) within the context of sacred spaces conceived for the 21st century.

Roni Horn aka Roni Horn - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through January 24, 2010 - Manhattan

For more than thirty years, Roni Horn (b. 1955) has been developing work of concentrated visual power and intellectual rigor, often exploring issues of gender, identity, androgyny, and the complex relationship between object and subject. Because the artist chooses not to privilege any one medium, Horn's art defies easy categorization. Materials – often used with remarkable virtuosity and sensitivity – take on metaphorical qualities and relate key themes with great visual power. Horn's interest in doubling and identity, for example, is central to understanding her approach to the genres of portraiture and landscape. Image-specific photographic portraits and ethereally beautiful abstract cast glass sculpture relay aspects of both. Similarly, Horn's intricately cut and pigmented drawings suggest something of the elemental nature of the earth that relates in turn to how the landscape of Iceland, where Horn has traveled and made work since 1975, has informed her practice.

The Red Book of C.G. Jung - Rubin Museum of Art
Through January 25, 2010 - Manhattan

The Red Book of C.G. Jung marks the first public presentation of what may be considered psychology's most influential unpublished work. Jung's fascination with mandalas -- Tibetan Buddhist representations of the cosmos used to help reach enlightenment -- is evident in these books where mandala structures figure prominently in many sketches and paintings.

MoMA Starts: An 80th Anniversary Exhibition - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 25, 2010 -

The Museum has always been at the forefront of exhibiting and collecting modern art, but equally important to its mission is educating and engaging the public. MoMA has constantly created new programs -- from children's art classes to concerts in the Sculpture Garden -- to supplement and enrich its exhibitions. This installation features photographs and unique documents drawn from the Museum Archives, celebrating MoMA's founding in 1929, as well as the initiation of a range of educational and cultural offerings that together have created a rich eighty-year legacy.

Bauhaus 1919-1933: Workshops for Modernity - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 25, 2010 -

This survey is MoMA's first major exhibition since 1938 on the subject of this famous and influential school of avant-garde art. Founded in 1919 and shut down by the Nazis in 1933, the Bauhaus brought together artists, architects, and designers in an extraordinary conversation about the nature of art in the age of technology. Aiming to rethink the very form of modern life, the Bauhaus became the site of a dazzling array of experiments in the visual arts that have profoundly shaped our visual world today.

Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection - Museum of Arts & Design
Through January 31, 2010 -

The first major museum exhibition of jewelry from the personal collection of Madeleine Albright, Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection features more than 200 pins, many of which Secretary Albright wore to communicate a message or a mood during her diplomatic tenure. The exhibition examines the collection for its historic significance as well as the expressive power of jewelry and its ability to communicate through a style and language of its own. The exhibition will be presented in the Museum's Tiffany & Co. Gallery, dedicated to the study and presentation of contemporary jewelry from around the world.

Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present - Brooklyn Museum
Through January 31, 2010 - Brooklyn

The first major museum exhibition on rock and roll to put photographers in the foreground, acknowledging their creative and collaborative role in the history of rock music. From its earliest days, rock and roll was captured in photographs that personalized, and frequently eroticized, the musicians, creating a visual identity for the genre. The photographers were handmaidens to the rock-and-roll revolution, and their images communicate the social and cultural transformations that rock has fostered since the1950s. The exhibition is in six sections: rare and revealing images taken behind the scenes; tender snapshots of young musicians at the beginnings of their careers; exhilarating photographs of live performances that display the energy, passion, style, and sex appeal of the band on stage; powerful images of the crowds and fans that are often evocative of historic paintings; portraits revealing the soul and creativity, rather than the surface and celebrity, of the musicians; and conceptual images and album covers highlighting the collaborative efforts between the image makers and the musicians.

Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future - Museum of the City of New York
Through January 31, 2010 -

One of the most prolific, unorthodox, and controversial figures of post-war, 20th-century architecture, Eero Saarinen, gets his first retrospective. The exhibition includes never-before-seen sketches, drawings, models, furnishings, films, and photographs from a career highlighted by remarkable designs such as the TWA Terminal at JFK, the St. Louis Gateway Arch, the CBS corporate headquarters, and Washington, DC's Dulles International Airport.

Nikhil Chopra: Yog Raj Chitrakar: Memory Drawing IX - New Museum of Contemporary Art
Through February 02, 2010 -

Nikhil Chopra combines strategies associated with theater, portraiture, landscape drawing, photography, art actions, and installation to chronicle the world through live performance. As the Victorian draughtsman Yog Raj Chitrakar, Chopra haunts bustling market squares, forgotten old buildings, city streets, and museum galleries to make large-scale drawings. Within the performance, daily actions -- washing, eating, drinking, sleeping, dressing, shaving, and observing -- are transformed into ritualistic spectacle. While an ambiguous past collides with a unstable present, Yog Raj Chitrakar reveals the process of documenting what he sees while exploring self-portraiture, autobiography, history, fantasy, and sexuality.

Urs Fischer: Marguerite de Ponty - New Museum of Contemporary Art
Through February 07, 2010 -

Zurich-born, New York-based artist Urs Fischer will be the first artist to take over the entire New Museum on the Bowery. For his first large-scale solo presentation in an American museum to date, Fischer will transform the New Museum's gallery spaces by creating a mesmerizing environment featuring towering monuments, tangled abstractions, and a labyrinth of mirrors. This exhibition will be the culmination of four years of work. Neither a traditional survey nor a retrospective, but rather an "introspective," as organizing curator Massimiliano Gioni calls it, the show will combine new productions and iconic artworks, allowing for an in-depth look at Fischer's practice. Choreographed entirely by the artist, the exhibition will offer viewers the unique opportunity to immerse themselves in Fischer's universe, which is both spectacular and fragile.

Velazquez Rediscovered - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through February 07, 2010 - Manhattan

Velazquez Rediscovered features a newly identified painting by Velazquez, Portrait of a Man, formerly ascribed to the workshop of Velazquez, and recently reattributed to the master himself following its cleaning and restoration. It will be shown alongside other works from the Museum's superior collection of works by the great Spanish painter.

Omer Fast: Nostalgia - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through February 14, 2010 - Manhattan

This exhibition features recent work by Fast, who received the Whitney's 2008 Bucksbaum Award for his widely acclaimed video, The Casting -- the artist's contribution to the 2008 Whitney Biennial. Closed Mon. & Tues. $18.

From Klimt to Klee: Masterworks from the Serge Sabarsky Collection - Neue Galerie
Through February 15, 2010 -

With this exhibition, Neue Galerie New York pays tribute to its co-founder, Serge Sabarsky. A tireless advocate for German and Austrian art, Sabarsky was the driving force behind the creation of the museum. He was also a dedicated collector, who acquired numerous masterworks by the artists he cherished. The exhibition demonstrates the range and quality of the Sabarsky Collection, with its holdings in works by Austrian artists Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Oskar Kokoschka, and German artists Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, among many others.

Cinnabar: The Chinese Art of Carved Lacquer - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through February 21, 2010 - Manhattan

Although lacquer is used in many Asian cultures, the art of carving lacquer is unique to China. In this technique, multiple layers (as many as 200) are applied onto a substructure in the shape of a box or some other container and individually dried and carved to create lush geometric motifs, lively representations of figures in landscapes, or birds flying among flowers. This exhibition, which celebrates the Met's collection, showcases approximately 50 examples of this art form. It features several newly acquired works, as well as an important recently restored 18th-century screen that is displayed for the first time.

Pablo Bronstein at the Met - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through February 21, 2010 - Manhattan

For this exhibition, Pablo Bronstein (b. 1977) will create two new bodies of work addressing the nature of the museum. Several large ink drawings will portray a mythical history of the Metropolitan Museum, imagining the building under construction and giant artworks being transported or installed. Running in parallel, a series of smaller digital images, displayed on tables under glass, will focus on a hypothetical future of the Museum.

NEW YORK PAINTING BEGINS: EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY PORTRAITS - The New York Historical Society
Through March 01, 2010 - New York

The New-York Historical Society holds one of the nation's premiere collections of eighteenth-century American portraits, works that art historian James Thomas Flexner called "the first flowers of our wilderness." This installation provides twenty-first century viewers with ways of understanding these remarkably innovative and engaging paintings, some of the earliest works of American art. The exhibition focuses on 26 eighteenth-century portraits that mark the beginnings of New York's primacy as a cultural center. It also includes a sampling of related objects from other N-YHS collections. It also speaks to the ways that these works have changed over time as a result of aging materials and conservation treatments.

Thomas Chambers (1808-1869): American Marine and Landscape Painter - American Folk Art Museum
Through March 07, 2010 -

Obscure in his own lifetime, Thomas Chambers found fame in the twentieth century with the discovery of The "Constitution" and the "Guerriere," a rare signed painting of his that unlocked the identity of the artist behind a singularly flamboyant group of mid-nineteenth-century American marine and landscape paintings. Chambers's expressive style and bold decorative sensibility appealed to avant-garde taste, and he was hailed as a spunky native original, "America's first modern." Although almost nothing was known about his life, his work rapidly earned a place in the growing collections and anthologies of American folk art. As more of Chambers's work came to light, a spare life story was constructed from census records, city directories, and a handful of dated paintings that document a career in the United States between 1832 and 1865. Widely recognized but little studied in the last fifty years, the artist receives here the first survey of his work since his modern debut in New York in 1942.

Thomas Chambers (1808-1869): American Marine and Landscape Painter - American Folk Art Museum
Through March 07, 2010 -

Obscure in his own lifetime, Thomas Chambers found fame in the twentieth century with the discovery of The "Constitution" and the "Guerriere," a rare signed painting of his that unlocked the identity of the artist behind a singularly flamboyant group of mid-nineteenth-century American marine and landscape paintings. Chambers's expressive style and bold decorative sensibility appealed to avant-garde taste, and he was hailed as a spunky native original, "America's first modern." Although almost nothing was known about his life, his work rapidly earned a place in the growing collections and anthologies of American folk art. As more of Chambers's work came to light, a spare life story was constructed from census records, city directories, and a handful of dated paintings that document a career in the United States between 1832 and 1865. Widely recognized but little studied in the last fifty years, the artist receives here the first survey of his work since his modern debut in New York in 1942.

Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks - Museum of the City of New York
Through March 07, 2010 -

Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks presents the work of photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who has spent more than three years recording wild places in New York City's parks. Located in all five boroughs, these escapes to the woodlands, streams, waterfronts, marshes, and beaches are among the city's greatest assets, yet they are hidden in plain sight. These wild areas, which have been left or returned to their natural state through the city's "Forever Wild" initiative, include the craggy highlands of Manhattan, the sea-facing marshes of Brooklyn, the rocky, Maine-like coastline of the Bronx, and the nearly impenetrable forests of Queens and Staten Island. Through his photographs, Meyerowitz transports the viewer into the heart of a lush wilderness, while portraying pockets of nature as an inextricable part of city life today.

A Woman's Wit: Jane Austen's Life and Legacy - Morgan Library & Museum
Through March 14, 2010 -

This exhibition explores the life, work, and legacy of Jane Austen (1775-1817), regarded as one of the greatest English novelists. Offering a close-up portrait of the iconic British author, whose popularity has surged over the last two decades with numerous motion picture and television adaptations of her work, the show provides tangible intimacy with Austen through the presentation of more than 100 works, including her manuscripts, personal letters, and related materials, many of which the Morgan has not exhibited in over a quarter century.

Leonardo da Vinci's Workshop - Discovery - Times Square Exposition
Through March 14, 2010 -

Explore Leonardo da Vinci's 500 year old inventions from his actual notebooks as they are brought to life in in this world-premiere exhibit. Discover how his visions for an airplane, automobile and bridge would have worked – long before they became the modern world's reality. Plus, uncover the translations and hidden meanings behind the mastermind's paintings, sketches and notebooks through innovative digital technology.

Imperial Privilege: Vienna Porcelain of Du Paquier, 1718–44 - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through March 21, 2010 - Manhattan

The second porcelain factory in Europe able to make true porcelain in the manner of the Chinese was established in Vienna in 1718. Founded by Claudius Innocentius Du Paquier, the small porcelain enterprise developed a highly distinctive style that remained Baroque in inspiration throughout the history of the factory, which was taken over by the State in 1744. Du Paquier produced a range of tablewares, decorative vases, and small-scale sculpture that found great popularity with the Hapsburg court and the Austrian nobility. This exhibition will chart the history of the development of the Du Paquier factory, setting its production within the historic and cultural context of Vienna in the first half of the eighteenth century. The porcelain to be featured will be drawn from both the Metropolitan Museum and the premier private collection of this material.

Lincoln and New York - New-York Historical Society
Through March 25, 2010 -

New York's role as the Union's prime provider of manpower, treasure, media coverage, image-making, and protest, some of it racist -- the 1863 Draft Riots and the robust effort to unseat Lincoln in 1864 -- are traced alongside Lincoln's concurrent growth as a leader, writer, symbol of Union and freedom, and ultimately as national martyr. Through all, from political parades to funeral processions, New York played a surprisingly central role in the Lincoln story -- and Lincoln became a leading player in the life of New York. This exhibition commemorates the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial.

FDR's Brain Trust and the Beginning of the New Deal - New-York Historical Society
Through March 25, 2010 -

In his search for a new national message during the 1932 presidential primary, FDR gathered around him a number of political, economic and legal scholars. The core of this group were Columbia University professors, who knew and trusted each other, and were willing to take risks and work long unpaid hours, to promote a candidate that they believed could turn around a nation in crisis. This exhibition will focus on the three key members of the Brain Trust, Raymond Moley, Rexford Tugwell, and Adolph Berle, and two of the New Deal cabinet members with whom they worked to bring about FDR's radical changes, Frances Perkins and Harry Hopkins. Using contemporary photographs, cartoons, broadsides, articles and newsreels, this exhibition will be supplemented by audio reminisces from the collection of the Columbia University Oral History Research Office.

Anish Kapoor: Memory - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through March 28, 2010 -

Memory (2008), a new commissioned Cor-Ten steel sculptural installation by Anish Kapoor made its debut at Deutsche Guggenheim in November 2008. The exhibition, part of the Guggenheim's 50th-anniversary celebrations, presents New York audiences with a site-specific adaption of the work, conceived originally for both exhibition locations.

The Life & Legacy of Lieutenant Petrosino - New York City Police Museum
Through March 31, 2010 -

Visit the Police Museum's newest installation celebrating one of the most famous officers in the history of the NYPD. Lieutenant Petrosino arrived in New York as a young boy in 1872 and grew to become a pioneer in the fight against organized crime until his murder in 1909 in Sicily. He remains the only New York City Police Officer to be killed in the line of duty while overseas. The original photographs, documents and artifacts within this collection, loaned by Lieutenant Petrosino's family, have waited 100 years to make their first-ever public debut.

Slash: Paper Under The Knife - Museum of Arts & Design
Through April 04, 2010 -

Slash: Paper Under the Knife takes the pulse of the international art world's renewed interest in paper as a creative medium and source of artistic inspiration, examining the remarkably diverse use of paper in a range of art forms. Slash is the third exhibition in MAD's Materials and Process series, which examines the renaissance of traditional handcraft materials and techniques in contemporary art and design. The exhibition surveys unusual paper treatments, including works that are burned, torn, cut by lasers, and shredded. A section of the exhibition will focus on artists who modify books to transform them into sculpture, while another will highlight the use of cut paper for film and video animations.

Design USA: Contemporary Innovation - Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum
Through April 04, 2010 -

Design USA celebrates the accomplishments of the winners honored during the first ten years of the prestigious National Design Awards. The exhibition features outstanding contemporary achievements in American architecture, landscape design, interior design, product design, communication design, corporate design, interaction design, and fashion. Developed in collaboration with the renowned firm 2x4, Design USA focuses on innovation through the lens of technology, material, method, craft and transformation.

Monet's Water Lilies - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 12, 2010 -

The Museum of Modern Art presents an installation that will, for the first time since the Museum's reopening in 2004, feature the full group of Claude Monet's late paintings in the collection. These include a mural-sized triptych (Water Lilies, 1914–26) and a single-panel painting of the water lilies in the Japanese-style pond that Monet cultivated on his property in Giverny, France (Water Lilies, 1914–26), as well as The Japanese Footbridge (c. 1920–22) and Agapanthus (1914–26), depicting the majestic plants in the pond's vicinity. These paintings have long held a special status with the Museum's audiences and, much like MoMA's Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden, they provide a modern oasis in the center of midtown Manhattan. These works will be complemented by two loans of closely related paintings.

Tim Burton - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 26, 2010 -

This major career retrospective on Tim Burton (American, b. 1958), consisting of a gallery exhibition and a film series, considers Burton's career as a director, producer, writer, and concept artist for live-action and animated films, along with his work as a fiction writer, photographer and illustrator. Following the current of his visual imagination from early childhood drawings through his mature work, the exhibition presents artwork generated during the conception and production of his films, and highlights a number of unrealized projects and never-before-seen pieces, as well as student art, his earliest non-professional films, and examples of his work as a storyteller and graphic artist for non-film projects.

Surface Tension: Contemporary Photographs from the Collection - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 16, 2010 - Manhattan

Photographs are often perceived as transparent windows onto a three-dimensional world. Yet photographs also have their own material presence as physical objects. Contemporary artists who exploit this apparent contradiction between photograph as window and photograph as object are featured in Surface Tension. This exhibition presents 30 works that play with the inherent tension between the flatness of the photograph and the often lifelike illusion of depth. Surface Tension highlights the ways in which artists use photographic and multi-media techniques to direct our attention to the physical surface of the photograph. Among the works featured are photographs that have been purposely scratched, burned, or painted on, as well as photograms made by placing objects directly on top of a sheet of photographic paper. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the permanent collection and features several recent acquisitions and other contemporary photographs never before shown at the Museum.

Traveling the Silk Road: Ancient Pathway to the Modern World - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 15, 2010 -

This intriguing exhibition brings to life one of the greatest trading routes in human history, showcasing the goods, cultures, and technologies from four representative cities: Xi'an, China's Tang Dynasty capital; Turfan, a verdant oasis and trading outpost; Samarkand, home of prosperous merchants who thrived on the caravan trade; and Baghdad, a fertile hub of commerce and scholarship that became the intellectual center of the era.

Approaching Abstraction - American Folk Art Museum
Through September 06, 2010 -

It is commonly assumed that contemporary self-taught artists work solely in a representational style, eager to engage in storytelling and personal memory. But while the narrative tradition often is a primary impulse, a significant number exhibit a tendency to be seduced by material, technique, color, form, line, and texture, creating artwork that omits or obscures representation. "Approaching Abstraction" highlights the work of more than forty of these artists and includes European art brut masters, such as Aloise Corbaz, Rafael Lonne, and Adolf Wolfli; self-taught artists from the American South, such as Thornton Dial Sr., Bessie Harvey, J.B. Murry, and Purvis Young; and lesser-known artists, such as Johnny Culver, Hiroyuki Doi, and Melvin Way. This first exploration into nonobjective expression within this field is selected entirely from the museum's permanent collection.

Sounding the Pacific: Musical Instruments of Oceania - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 07, 2010 - Manhattan

This exhibition -- the first in an art museum to be devoted exclusively to Oceanic musical instruments -- explores the rich diversity of musical instruments created and used in the Pacific Islands. Drawn primarily from the Met's collections, the exhibition features more than 60 instruments from small personal types such as panpipes and courting whistles to larger forms played at performances heard by the entire community, such as the exquisitely carved temple drums of the Austral Islands or the imposing sacred slit gongs of New Guinea.

Up Close: Henry Darger and the Coloring Book - American Folk Art Museum
Through September 13, 2010 -

Henry Darger (1892-1973) adopted countless images from popular-media sources, such as newspapers, magazines, comics, and cartoons, but no single source influenced him as steadily as the coloring book. This intimate exhibition features nine examples culled from the museum's extensive Henry Darger Study Archive, illustrating the primary role the coloring book played for this important twentieth-century artist.

Body Parts: Ancient Egyptian Fragments and Amulets - Brooklyn Museum
Through October 02, 2010 - Brooklyn

Body Parts features thirty-five objects that represent individual body parts in ancient Egyptian art from the Brooklyn Museum's collection, many of which will be displayed for the first time. While traditional exhibitions of ancient art focus on reconstructing damaged works, this exhibition uses fragmentary objects to illuminate the very realistic depiction of individual body parts in canonical Egyptian sculpture. The ancient Egyptians carefully depicted each part of the human body, respecting the significance of every detail. When viewed individually these sculptures and fragments reveal ancient notions of the body, as well as details of workmanship, frequently unnoticed in more complete sculptures.

A Song for the Horse Nation - National Museum of the American Indian
Through July 07, 2011 -

A Song for the Horse Nation presents the epic story of the horse's influence on American Indian tribes from the 1600s to the present. Drawing upon a treasure-trove of stunning historical objects -- including ledger drawings, hoof ornaments, beaded bags, hide robes, paintings, and other objects -- and new pieces by contemporary Native artists, the exhibition reveals how horses shaped the social, economic, cultural, and spiritual foundations of American Indian life, particularly on the Great Plains.


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