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Things to do this week in NYC Dec 22-Dec 29: Museums

December 22, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Holiday Spotlight Tour - Morgan Library & Museum
December 28, 2012 - New York

These holiday-focused tours include stops at a Gospel Lectionary featuring an illumination of the Nativity, Beatrix Potter's designs for holiday cards, and the manuscript of Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol.

Masterworks - The Rubin Museum
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

Masterworks: Jewels of the Collection displays some of the museum's most stunning works of art. The stylistic diversity and relationships between various strands of Himalayan and neighboring cultural and artistic traditions are represented by important works of art spanning a period of over one thousand years. In addition to a wide range of Buddhist and Hindu deities rendered in all major media, Masterworks also highlights the museum's most notable recent acquisitions, all of which have rarely or never been exhibited. Life-size facsimiles of an entire sequence of murals from the Lukhang, the Dalai Lamas' Secret Temple near the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet, provide an exceptional opportunity for viewing Himalayan art at its most lavish. The original eighteenth-century wall paintings--inaccessible to the public until the late twentieth century--uniquely depict the most esoteric of meditation and yoga practices in vivid color and detail. Created with new photographic methods by Thomas Laird and Clint Clemens, this display of large-format, high resolution pigment prints allows for even better access to the paintings than is possible in the temple itself. Their presentation at the Rubin marks the first showing in the world of prints created using this technology and also provides the first-ever opportunity outside Tibet to view full-size Tibetan murals in their relationship to portable art from the region.

Emma Lazarus: Poet of Exiles - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

A new exhibition held in conjunction with the 125th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty. Known for more than a century as the author of the lines "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free...," the poet Emma Lazarus gave voice to the Statue of Liberty and generations of newcomers to America. However, few people know her fascinating story, her Sephardic background, her American roots, and her work for Jewish causes and a Jewish homeland. Learn how Emma Lazarus' journey inspired her to craft an enduring message on exile, refuge, and the promise of America.

Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

For decades, critics have observed that Andy Warhol exerted an enormous impact on contemporary art, but no exhibition has yet explored the full nature or extent of that influence. Through approximately forty-five works by Warhol alongside one hundred works by some sixty other artists, Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years juxtaposes prime examples of Warhol's paintings, sculpture, and films with those by other artists who in key ways reinterpret, respond, or react to his groundbreaking work. What emerges is a fascinating dialogue between works of art and artists across generations.

Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through December 31, 2012 -

For decades, critics have observed that Andy Warhol exerted an enormous impact on contemporary art, but no exhibition has yet explored the full nature or extent of that influence. Through approximately forty-five works by Warhol alongside one hundred works by some sixty other artists, Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years juxtaposes prime examples of Warhol's paintings, sculpture, and films with those by other artists who in key ways reinterpret, respond, or react to his groundbreaking work. What emerges is a fascinating dialogue between works of art and artists across generations.

Shadow Monsters - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

In this installation, interaction designer Philip Worthington radically enlivens the timeless amusement of creating shadow puppets with the support of a computer, a camera, two projectors, a light box, and original code. The fantasy of monsters materializing from the shadows becomes a reality, thanks to vision-recognition software that augments the gestures of participants with sound and animation.

Now's the Time: Recent Acquisitions - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 02, 2013 - New York

This presentation surveys some of the most exciting contemporary artworks acquired by the Guggenheim in the past five years. Works by artists such as Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Lyle Ashton Harris, Barbara Kruger, Ryan Trecartin, and Danh Vo are on view in the museum for the first time.

Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 06, 2013 - Upper West Side

The perpetually dark deep ocean comprises the vast majority of the planet's habitable environments where approximately 90 percent of the organisms are bioluminescent and provide the only source of light. Many of these environments are threatened habitats where organisms are in danger of disappearing, some before they have been discovered and studied. Creatures of Light introduces visitors to the astonishing variety of bioluminescent creatures; explores the different ways in which organisms glow, as well as explains the physics and chemistry of natural light; reveals how the ability to glow can be advantageous; and considers how scientists study -- and use -- bioluminescence. Visitors enter the exhibition through a forest of bioluminescent mushrooms surrounding a large-scale mushroom at the center. One section evokes a New England meadow on a summer night and highlights how fireflies use patterns of flashing light to communicate and attract mates; another invites visitors to peer into Waitomo Cave of New Zealand and learn how glowworms attract prey. The exhibition includes live flashlight fish that harbor bioluminescent bacteria. Creatures of Light also features an interactive environment that introduces visitors to the brilliant light displays of Mosquito Bay in Vieques, Puerto Rico, where high concentrations of microscopic dinoflagellates, a type of plankton, create a glowing, luminescent halo around anything that moves through the bay; and a large interactive image of the Bloody Bay coral wall in the Cayman Islands. A "deep sea theater" reveals the amazing diversity of living light that marine biologists have captured on camera including anglerfishes waving bioluminescent "lures" to attract prey and jellyfishes that light up like a flashing pinwheel when threatened.

Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Creche - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 -

The Museum continues a longstanding holiday tradition with the presentation of its Christmas tree, a favorite of New Yorkers and visitors from around the world. A vivid eighteenth-century Neapolitan Nativity scene?embellished with a profuse array of diminutive, lifelike attendant figures and silk-robed angels hovering above -- adorns the candlelit spruce. Recorded music and lighting ceremonies add to the enjoyment of the holiday display.

Spiders Alive! - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 06, 2013 - Upper West Side

For centuries, spiders have inspired storytellers, from Ovid to E. B. White to the creators of the eponymous superhero, but their actual role in diverse ecosystems around the globe is just as captivating. Spiders Alive! immerses visitors in the fascinating and complex world of spiders, among the most versatile animals on the planet: they inhabit every continent but Antarctica and are able to survive in environments that range from deserts to rainforests to crowded cities. Spiders are also important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds of insects a year. Scientists have identified over 42,000 species of spiders to date, and there are at least as many more to be discovered. Among the live spiders visitors will encounter in this exhibition are the goliath bird eater, one of the largest spiders in the world, whose prey includes snakes, mice, and frogs; the venomous western black widow, one of the few North American spiders harmful to people; and species from other arachnid orders, including African whip spiders, whose whip-like feelers, up to 10 inches in length, help the animal find its way. Spiders Alive! will explore spiders' silk, venom, and little-known defensive mechanisms such as mimicry and noise making. The exhibition will also include larger-than-life models, videos, interactive exhibits, and fossils, and Museum staff will be handling live arachnids for visitors to see up close. Gallery 77, first floor

Colors of the Universe - Chinese Hardstone Carving - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 -

Stone carving is one of the oldest arts in China, its beginnings dating back to remote antiquity. Although jade, the mineral nephrite, was held in the highest esteem, all stones that could achieve a luster after polishing, be it agate, turquoise, malachite, chalcedony, quartz, jasper, or lapis lazuli, were also appreciated. Stone carving experienced an efflorescence during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911), when an abundant supply of raw materials, exceptionally accomplished craftsmen, and, in particular, keen imperial patronage contributed to the creation of numerous superb works.

Ada Bobonis: Stages, Mountains, Water - Queens Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 - Queens

Ada Bobonis' site-specific installation entitled Stages, Mountains, Water transforms the Museum's second floor gallery space into an invigorating chromatic environment evoking the Caribbean landscape. Geometric compositions in hues of blue and green are either painted on the wall or adhered to the glass railing facade in the form of translucent color film. Alluding to horizons and vistas, expansive bodies of land and water, the work takes its inspiration from the Panama Canal, one of the icons of 19th century aspirations for the New World. The construction of the Panama Canal (1880 - 1914) was a historical triumph of international ambition at the turn of the century. Upon completion, the 51-mile-long ship canal connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean by cutting across the Isthmus of Panama, and has since become a key conduit for global maritime trade. The area's topography is characterized by vast mountain vistas, the Gatun Lake, and the presence of the Panama Canal Locks (long vertical barriers of different sizes controlling the passage of over-sized ships), and is a spectacular fusion of the natural world and man's interventions upon it. Stages, Mountains, Water deftly renders the peculiar landscape of the Panama Canal in a minimal composition of color and shapes. While the color-treated glass railing facade creates an evocative aquatic effect, the "cloud of blades" overhead – clustered sculptural cutouts spanning the gallery's ceiling - symbolizes man's forceful intercession in the natural landscape that profoundly altered the location. The installation further brings the view of Flushing Meadows Corona Park and the Unisphere, a 140-foot-high steel representation of Earth built as an emblem for the 1964 World's Fair, into the gallery space itself. Separated by exactly half a century, the Panama Canal and the Unisphere - both products of the state-of-the-art engineering of their time - echo each other with the timeless human aspiration for exploration they embody, whether by taming the power of the oceans or spanning the infinite reaches of outer space.

Chinese Gardens - Pavilions, Studios, Retreats - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 -

In the densely populated urban centers of China, enclosed gardens have long been an integral part of residential and palace architecture, serving as extensions of living quarters. The preferred site for hosting literary gatherings, theatrical performances, and imaginary outings, gardens were often designed following the same compositional principles used in painting. And as idealized landscapes, gardens often drew inspiration from literary themes first envisioned by painters. Not only were painters often recruited to design gardens, but as gardens came to be identified with the tastes and personalities of their residents, artists were also called upon to create idealized paintings of gardens to serve as symbolic portraits intended to reflect the character of the owner. This exhibition, which encircles the Astor Chinese Garden Court, explores the pictorial imagery of gardens as an abiding source of artistic invention. Featuring more than sixty paintings, as well as ceramics, carved bamboo, lacquerware, metalwork, textiles, and several contemporary photographs from the Museum's collection, the exhibition examines the rich interactions between pictorial and garden arts in China across more than one thousand years.

Durer to de Kooning: 100 Master Drawings from Munich - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 06, 2013 - Midtown

Durer to de Kooning: 100 Master Drawings from Munich showcases the Morgan's significant holdings with exceptional examples by Italian, German, French, and Dutch and Flemish artists of the Renaissance and baroque; German draftsmen of the nineteenth century; and an international contingent of modern and contemporary draftsmen. This exhibition marks the first time works from the renowned graphics collection at Munich have been shown in the United States.

ROLLING STONES: 50 - Paley Center for Media
Through January 06, 2013 -

The Paley Center for Media is thrilled to be part of the fiftieth milestone celebration of The Rolling Stones, who on July 12, 1962, went on stage for the first time at the Marquee Club in London's Oxford Street and changed music history. This gallery exhibit—first seen at Somerset House, London, and never before exhibited in the U.S.—includes seventy rare prints including reportage, live concert and studio sessions, and outtakes, giving us an unmatched, front-row look at every period of the band's history. To complement the photography exhibition, the Paley Center has curated a video compilation from its wide-ranging music collection, highlighting the Stones's most impressive appearances over five decades.

Quay Brothers: On Deciphering the Pharmacist's Prescription for Lip-Reading Puppets - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 07, 2013 - Midtown

This MoMA gallery exhibition and accompanying film retrospective will be the first presentation of the Quay Brothers' work in all their fields of creative activity. Internationally renowned moving image artists and designers, the Quay Brothers were born outside Philadelphia and have worked from their London studio, Atelier Koninck, since the late 1970s. For over 30 years, they have been in the avant-garde of stop-motion puppet animation and live-action movie-making in the Eastern European tradition of filmmakers like Walerian Borowczyk and Jan Svankmajer and the Russian Yuri Norstein, and have championed a design aesthetic influenced by the graphic surrealism of Polish poster artists of the 1950s and 1960s. Beginning with their student films in 1971, the Quay Brothers have produced over 45 moving image works, including two features, music videos, dance films, documentaries, and signature personal works, including The Street of Crocodiles (1986), the Stille Nacht series (1988-2008), Institute Benjamenta (1995), and In Absentia (2000). They have also designed sets and projections for opera, drama, and concert performances such as Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa (1991), Ionesco's The Chairs (Tony-nominated design, 1997), Richard Ayre's The Cricket Recovers (2005), and recent site-specific pieces based on the work of Bart?k and Kafka. In addition to their better known films, this exhibition will include never-before-seen moving image works and graphic design, drawings, and calligraphy, presenting animated and live-action films alongside installations, objects, and works on paper.

Eyes Closed/Eyes Open: Recent Acquisitions in Drawings - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 07, 2013 - Midtown

This exhibition is culled from the past two years of acquisitions by MoMA's Department of Drawings. Anchored in various explorations of the late 1960s, these works reveal a range of creative, intellectual, and critical impulses -- whether serving as an intimate record of the artist's practice, or purposefully crafted to address an assumed wider audience. German artist Franz Erhard Walther created a suite of "work drawings" to illustrate (both functionally and conceptually) his First Work Series (1963-69), a group of 58 interactive sculptural objects, on display at the Museum for the first time since their original presentation here in 1969. While roughly contemporary, Willem de Kooning's "Eyes-Closed" drawings of 1966, which were sketched blindly by the artist, offer a counterpoint to Walther's project and seem to embrace the traditional role of drawing as a tool of private expression, while Martha Rosler's Bringing the War Home: House Beautiful photomontage series of 1967-72 turns a critical eye to the era's sociopolitical context and expanding media sphere.

Designing Nature - The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 13, 2013 -

"Rinpa" is a modern term that refers to a distinctive style of Japanese pictorial and applied arts that arose in the early seventeenth century and has continued through modern times. Literally meaning "school of Korin," Rinpa derives its name from Ogata Korin (1658-1716), a celebrated painter from Kyoto. It embraces art marked by a bold, graphic abbreviation of natural motifs, frequent reference to traditional court literature and poetry, the lavish use of expensive mineral and metallic pigments, incorporation of calligraphy into painting compositions, and innovative experimentation with new brush techniques. The exhibition will feature more than one hundred brilliantly executed works of art created in Japan by the Rinpa-school artists. It will be held in two rotations, the first opening on May 26, 2012; the second on September 12, 2012. Highlighting the school's most prominent proponents, this two-part presentation will trace the development of the Rinpa aesthetic and will demonstrate how its style continued to influence artists throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Comprising more than fifty works from the Museum's own holdings supplemented by forty-five loans from public and private collections on the east coast, the exhibition will include many masters' renowned works in a variety of media: painting, textiles, lacquerware, and ceramics.

The Deutsche Bank Series at the Guggenheim: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

Gabriel Orozco's Asterisms, the final project in Deutsche Guggenheim's commissioning program, is a two-part sculptural and photographic installation comprising thousands of items of detritus Orozco has gathered at two sites -- a playing field near the artist's home in New York and a protected coastal biosphere in Baja California, Mexico, that is also the repository for flows of industrial and commercial waste from across the Pacific Ocean. The two related bodies of work provocatively oscillate between the macro and the micro and invoke several of the artist's recurring motifs, including the traces of erosion, poetic encounters with mundane materials, and the ever-present tension between nature and culture. The show also underscores and amplifies Orozco's subtle practice of subjecting the world to personal, idiosyncratic systems. The exhibition is organized by Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, and Joan Young, Director, Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and is accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue. This exhibition is made possible by Deutsche Bank. The Leadership Committee for Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Wade Guyton OS - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

Over the past decade, New York-based artist Wade Guyton (b. 1972) has pioneered a groundbreaking body of work that explores our changing relationships to images and artworks through the use of common digital technologies, such as the desktop computer, scanner, and inkjet printer. Guyton's purposeful misuse of these tools to make paintings and drawings results in beautiful accidents that relate to daily lives now punctuated by misprinted photos and blurred images on our phone and computer screens. Comprising more than eighty works dating from 1999 to the present, Guyton's first midcareer survey features a dramatic, non-chronological design in which staggered rows of parallel walls confront the viewer like the layered pages of a book or stacked windows on a monitor. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings, photography, and sculpture, and concludes with two spectacular new canvases, stretching up to fifty feet in length, which Guyton created specifically for the Whitney's Marcel Breuer-designed building. The title, Wade Guyton OS employs the common acronym for a computer's "operating system," linking Guyton's art to the technologies of our time.

Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

Every holiday season, the Morgan displays Charles Dickens's original manuscript of A Christmas Carol in Pierpont Morgan's historic Library. Dickens wrote his iconic tale in a six-week flurry of activity, beginning in October 1843 and ending in time for Christmas publication. He had the manuscript bound in red morocco as a gift for his solicitor, Thomas Mitton. The manuscript then passed through several owners before Pierpont Morgan acquired it in the 1890s.

Candid - The Rubin Museum
Through January 14, 2013 - New York

Homai Vyarawalla (1913-2012) was India's first female photojournalist. This exhibition, the first on Vyarawalla outside of India, will present her photography from the late 1930s to 1970, and narrate her extraordinary life with a biographical film and ephemera from her career. From early in her career, Homai Vyarawalla documented key events from the generation around Independence, including the historic meeting of Gandhi and the Congress Committee on the 1947 plan for partition, and she recorded the visits to India of world leaders and dignitaries including Queen Elizabeth, Jacqueline Kennedy, Ho Chi Minh, and Zhou Enlai. She was revered in India and her recent death at age 98 generated tributes around the world. The exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Alkazi Foundation for the Arts in New Delhi.

Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier) - Frick Collection
Through January 20, 2013 - New York

This fall The Frick Collection will present Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier). The painting has not left its home institution, the Norton Simon Museum, in Pasadena, CA, in nearly forty years, making this a particularly rare and exciting viewing opportunity for East Coast audiences. The exhibition aims to shed light on the master's transformative contribution to this art form, incorporating the results of newly performed technical research to answer questions about the dating of Antico's works, his technique, and his development as an innovative artist. Jointly organized by the National Gallery of Art and The Frick Collection, the exhibition opened in the fall of 2011 in Washington, D.C., before traveling to New York City the following spring. The exhibition is curated by Eleonora Luciano, Associate Curator of Sculpture at the National Gallery of Art, in collaboration with Denise Allen, Curator at The Frick Collection. The accompanying catalogue is written by an international team of scholars including Eleonora Luciano, Denise Allen, and Claudia Kryza-Gersch, Curator of Italian Sculpture at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. It will be the first independent monograph in English to focus on the artist and the first comprehensive presentation of his works in color.

Picasso Black and White - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 23, 2013 - New York

Picasso Black and White marks the first major exhibition to focus on the recurrent motif of black and white throughout Pablo Picasso's career. Surveying his oeuvre from 1904 to 1971, Picasso Black and White examines the artist's lifelong exploration of a black-and-white palette through approximately 115 paintings and a selection of sculptures and works on paper. The exhibition thematically traces the artist's unique vision throughout his work, including early monochromatic blue and rose paintings, gray-toned Cubist canvases, elegant and austere neoclassical portraits and nudes, Surrealist-inspired figures, forceful and somber scenes depicting the atrocities of war, allegorical still lifes, vivid interpretations of art-historical masterpieces, and the electric, highly sexualized canvases of Picasso's last years. The exhibition includes significant loans drawn from private collections, including many from the Picasso family; from museums across Europe and the United States; and from numerous public and private European and American collections, many of which have not been exhibited or published before. The exhibition is organized by Carmen Gimenez, Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of Twentieth-Century Art, with assistance from Karole Vail, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Picasso Black and White is sponsored by Bank of America. Major support is provided by the Picasso Black and White Leadership Committee, with Christina and Robert C. Baker, Chairs; Acquavella Galleries; J. Ira and Nicki Harris Foundation; The Lauder Foundation-Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund; Phyllis and William Mack; Stephen and Nan Swid; and Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed. Additional support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, and the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Faking It - Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 27, 2013 -

This international loan exhibition traces the history of manipulated photography from the 1840s through the early 1990s, when the computer replaced manual techniques as the dominant means of doctoring photographs. Most of the two hundred pictures on view were altered after the negative was exposed -- through photomontage, combination printing, overpainting, retouching, or, as is often the case, a blend of several processes. In every instance, the final image differs significantly from what stood before the camera at any given moment.

Born Out of Necessity - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 28, 2013 - Midtown

Showcasing objects that adhere to the traditional view of design as a tool for problem-solving, Born out of Necessity offers close examination of the problems themselves -- whether urgent, foreseen, or imagined. From objects that respond to pressing needs in developing countries to new solutions that are tailored to the urban environment, the exhibition examines how design intervenes across a range of experiences, including medical emergencies and natural disasters. Other objects demonstrate how products created to address specific challenges for people with disabilities can provide solutions that improve everyone's life. Drawing on the narrative power of design, Born out of Necessity addresses a host of complex cultural developments, such as the need to incorporate environmental responsibility in everyday life, our attempts to marry ancient religious beliefs with contemporary mores, and the desire to anticipate and prevent technological and ecological quagmires.

New Photography 2012 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 04, 2013 - Midtown

New Photography 2012 presents five artists -- Michele Abeles, Birdhead (Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), Anne Collier, Zoe Crosher, and Shirana Shahbazi -- whose varied techniques and backgrounds represent the diversity and vitality of photography today.

Nature and the American Vision: The Hudson River School - New-York Historical Society
Through February 21, 2013 - New York

After a national tour, the forty-five iconic works, including Thomas Cole's five-part series The Course of Empire and other masterworks by Cole, John F. Kensett, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper F. Cropsey, Asher B. Durand and others will once again be on display at the New-York Historical Society.

Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 25, 2013 - New York

Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde brings together some of the most iconic works from the period as well as works recently discovered or reevaluated by new scholarship. A significant number are already part of MoMA's collection, while others are on loan from important public collections in Japan and the United States. Artists in the exhibition include artist collectives such as Jikken Kobo (Experimental Workshop), Hi Red Center (Takamatsu Jiro, Akasegawa Genpei, Nakanishi Natsuyuki), and Group Ongaku (Group Music); critical artistic figures such as Okamoto Taro, Nakamura Hiroshi, Ay-O, Yoko Ono, Shiomi Mieko, and Tetsumi Kudo; photographers Moriyama Daido, Hosoe Eikoh, and Tomatsu Shomei; illustrators and graphic designers Yokoo Tadanori, Sugiura Kohei, and Awazu Kiyoshi; and architects Tange Kenzo, Isozaki Arata, and Kurokawa Kisho, among others.

Sinister Pop - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

Sinister Pop presents an inventive take on the Museum's rich and diverse holdings of Pop art from the movement's inception in the early 1960s through its aftershocks a decade later. Although Pop art often calls to mind a celebration of postwar consumer culture, this exhibition focuses on Pop's darker side, as it distorts and critiques the American dream. Themes of exaggerated consumption, film noir and the depiction of women in art, the dystopic American landscape, and the intersection of popular culture and politics, are explored through works by acknowledged masters such as Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenburg, Ed Ruscha, and Andy Warhol, as well as by many artists not traditionally associated with Pop whose art may be understood within its wider field of reference. These include William Eggleston, Peter Saul, Christina Ramberg, and Vija Celmins, among others.

Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 15, 2013 - New York

In 1912, in several European cities, a handful of artists -- Vasily Kandinsky, Frantisek Kupka, Francis Picabia, and Robert Delaunay -- presented the first abstract pictures to the public. Inventing Abstraction, 1910-25 celebrates the centennial of this bold new type of artwork, tracing the development of abstraction as it moved through a network of modern artists, from Marsden Hartley and Marcel Duchamp to Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, sweeping across nations and across media. The exhibition brings together many of the most influential works in abstraction's early history and covers a wide range of artistic production, including paintings, drawings, books, sculptures, films, photographs, sound poems, atonal music, and non-narrative dance, to draw a cross-media portrait of these watershed years.

Kandinsky 1911-1913 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through April 17, 2013 - New York

Perhaps more than any other 20th-century painter, Vasily Kandinsky (b. 1866, Moscow; d. 1944, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) has been closely linked to the history of the Guggenheim Museum. Hilla Rebay?artist, art advisor, and the museum's first director?promoted nonobjective painting above all other forms of abstraction. She was particularly inspired by the work and writing of Kandinsky, a pioneer of abstraction, who believed that the task of the painter was to convey his own inner world, rather than imitate the natural world. The museum's holdings have grown to include more than 150 works by Kandinsky, and focused exhibitions of his works are presented in the Kandinsky Gallery on Annex Level 3. The current installation, Kandinsky 1911?1913, highlights paintings completed at the moment the artist made great strides toward complete abstraction and published his aesthetic treatise, On the Spiritual in Art (1911, though dated 1912). Also featured are paintings by Robert Delaunay and Franz Marc that were exhibited alongside the work of Kandinsky and others in the landmark 1912 Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) exhibition held at the Moderne Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser in Munich.

The Shaping of New Visions: Photography, Film, Photobook - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 29, 2013 - Midtown

This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography's role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements -- with a special emphasis on the medium's relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and Post-Conceptual art -- and in the development of contemporary artistic practices. The shaping of what came to be known as "New Vision" photography bore the obvious influence of "lens-based" and "time-based" works. El Lissitzky best summarized its ethos: "The new world will not need little pictures," he wrote in The Conquest of Art (1922). "If it needs a mirror, it has the photograph and the cinema." Bringing together over 250 works from MoMA's collection, the exhibition features major projects by Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Germaine Krull, Gerhard Ruhm, Helen Levitt, Daido Moriyama, Robert Heinecken, Ed Ruscha, Martha Rosler, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip-Lorca DiCorcia, and Walid Raad, among others. Photographic history is presented as a multivalent history of distinct "new visions," rooted in unconventional and innovative exercises that range from photograms and photomontages to experimental films and photobooks.

Edvard Munch: The Scream - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 29, 2013 - New York

Edvard Munch's iconic The Scream (1895), among the most celebrated and recognized images in art history, will be on view at The Museum of Modern Art for a period of six months. Of the four versions of The Scream made by Munch between 1893 and 1910, this pastel-on-board from 1895 is the only one remaining in private hands; the three other versions are in the collections of museums in Norway. The Scream is being lent by a private collector.

WWII & NYC - New York Historical Society
Through May 27, 2013 - Upper West Side

When World War II broke out, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the war and strongly held opinions. WWII & NYC will explore the impact of the war on the metropolis, which played a critical role in the national war effort, and how the city was forever changed.

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter! - American Museum of Natural History
Through May 28, 2013 - New York

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter!, a perennial favorite visited by millions of children and adults, returns to the American Museum of Natural History. This popular winter attraction invites visitors to mingle with up to 500 iridescent butterflies fluttering among blooming tropical flowers and lush green vegetation inside a free-standing, balmy, 1,200-square-foot enclosure.

Aesthetic Ambitions: Edward Lycett and Brooklyn's Faience Manufacturing Company - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 16, 2013 -

This exhibition highlights the nearly fifty-year career of ceramicist Edward Lycett (American, 1833-1910), creative director of the Faience Manufacturing Company from 1884 to 1890. The range of works illustrates Lycett's talent and adaptability to stylistic changes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as his vision for Faience, a company based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, that earned acclaim for producing ornamental wares that introduced a new standard of excellence in American ceramics. These bold and eclectic pieces synthesized Japanese, Chinese, and Islamic influences characteristic of the Aesthetic movement and were sold in the United States' foremost art ware emporiums, including Tiffany & Company. Among the ceramics on view are 39 Faience pieces, including a number of large-scale vases. Also on view are Lycett's formula books, family photographs, and other ephemera; rare examples of ceramic works by his three sons; and other Brooklyn-made ceramics from the Museum´┐Żs collection.

The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed Instruments - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through June 30, 2013 -

The Sau-Wing Lam collection of violin-family instruments is one of the most important collections of bowed Italian stringed instruments ever assembled by a private individual. Sau-Wing Lam (1923-1988) was born in Shanghai, China, where he graduated with a degree in economics from the prestigious Saint John's University. In 1948 he moved to New York City and eventually became the president of the Dah Chong Hong Trading Corporation, Inc., an import-export business that founded some of the most successful automobile dealerships in the country. An amateur violinist and violist, Lam bought his first important violin in the 1960s and assembled his impressive collection of violins and bows over the next twenty-five years. His holdings eventually included such significant instruments as the "Baltic" violin by Giuseppe Guarneri "del Gesu," the "Bavarian" and "Scotland University" violins by Antonio Stradivari, the "ex Collin" violin by Nicolo Amati, an extremely early viola by Andrea Amati, and Lam's favorite violin, an instrument by Giuseppe Guarneri, one of his earliest acquisitions. Sau-Wing Lam enjoyed sharing his collection and regularly opened his home to scholars, dealers, and musicians. The family hosted impromptu chamber concerts and passionate discussions about music that would last well into the early morning hours. On the twenty-fifth anniversary of Mr. Lam's death, the collection is being exhibited here for the first time in the United States.

Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 11, 2013 - New York

Food celebrates cultures and cooking, historic meals and markets, and moments in our lives that we mark with food -- as well as the ingredients that we have discovered and shaped over the course of thousands of years. As this exhibition takes visitors on a journey of growing, transporting, cooking, tasting, and celebrating, it also examines contemporary issues of environmental and human health, food security, feeding the world's growing population, and how we will eat in the future. Gallery 3, third floor

WINGED TAPESTRIES: MOTHS AT LARGE - American Museum of Natural History
Through September 29, 2013 -

Winged Tapestries: Moths at Large, an exhibition of 34 striking images featuring dramatic images of moths, opens at AMNH. On view in the IMAX Corridor on the first floor, the exhibition displays the arresting beauty and surprising diversity of moths from Ottawa-based photographer Jim des Rivières. "Moths are beautiful, and in many respects prettier than butterflies," says exhibition curator David Grimaldi, curator, Division of Invertebrate Zoology. "In this show, we have macro or relatively large moths. They're gorgeous." Primitive moths appeared about 195 million years ago, whereas the oldest butterfly fossil is about 55 million years old. And today, moths outnumber butterflies 15 to 1, with approximately 150,000 described species of moths worldwide, compared to 10,000 butterfly species.

American Legends: From Calder to O'Keeffe - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through December 22, 2013 - New York

American Legends: From Calder to O'Keeffe showcases the Whitney's deep holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century by the eighteen leading artists: Oscar Bluemner, Charles Burchfield, Paul Cadmus, Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Ralston Crawford, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Gaston Lachaise, Jacob Lawrence, John Marin, Reginald Marsh, Elie Nadelman, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Joseph Stella. Organized as concentrated one- and two-artist presentations, each gallery will serve as an interdisciplinary, small-scale retrospective. Rotations of art and of artists will be made during the exhibition's yearlong duration.

Gateway to Himalayan Art - The Rubin Museum
Through January 06, 2014 - New York

Marking the first in a series of yearly rotations, nearly twenty works of art add new dimensions and context to Gateway to Himalayan Art. Visitors will notice a greater emphasis on Hindu works, with beautiful examples from India and Nepal ranging from 12th to 19th centuries, as well as intricately-detailed thangka paintings, manuscript pages, and textiles. In every iteration, Gateway acquaints new and long-time friends of the museum with the principal concepts of Himalayan art, including important deities and symbols, the materials and techniques used in creating works of art, and the purposes and functions of these works in their sacred and secular contexts. And don't forget to pick up your Gateway Looking Guide to help you identify important figures and symbols throughout the museum. It's yours to keep.

Contemporary Art from the Collection - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 17, 2014 - Midtown

Reinstalled to continue the historical sequence found on MoMA's fifth (1880-1940) and fourth (1940-1980) floors, the galleries on the second floor will begin with art of the early 1980s and extend to the present moment, interweaving works in all mediums. Individual galleries will focus on particular topics, ranging from specific locales that nourished influential groups of artists to key strategies shared by diverse practitioners of the same generation. Others will display a single significant installation or artist's project. Like the fifth- and fourth-floor galleries, the second-floor galleries will be periodically reinstalled to reflect the depth and richness of the Museum's collection, and to allow for varying approaches to the wide variety of art produced during the last 30 years. Featured artists include Ashley Bickerton, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring, Martin Kippenberger, Steve McQueen, Senga Nengudi, Doris Salcedo, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Rosemarie Trockel.

 

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