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Things to do this week in NYC Feb 11-Feb 18: Cultural Arts
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February 11, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

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Dance, art galleries, museums, lectures -- you name it, there are plenty of things to do in NYC. From the New York City Ballet, to Alvin Ailey, from performances at the Metropolitan Opera, to live music at Madison Square Garden, New York has it all. Here is a selection of what's going on in New York this week.

Concerto Barocco - New York City Ballet
February 11, 2012 -

Balanchine said of this work: "If the dance designer sees in the development of classical dancing a counterpart in the development of music and has studied them both, he will derive continual inspiration from great scores." In the first movement of the concerto, the two ballerinas personify the violins, while a corps of eight women accompany them. In the second movement, a largo, the male dancer joins the leading woman in a pas de deux. In the concluding allegro section, the entire ensemble expresses the syncopation and rhythmic vitality of Bach's music.

This work began as an exercise by Balanchine for the School of American Ballet and was performed by American Ballet Caravan on its historic tour of South America and later entered the repertory of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. In 1951 Balanchine permanently eliminated the original costumes and dressed the dancers in practice clothes, probably the first appearance of what has come to be regarded as a signature Balanchine costume for contemporary works. On October 11, 1948, Concerto Barocco was one of three ballets on the program at New York City Ballet's first performance.

Tarantella - New York City Ballet
February 11, 2012 -

The nimble quickness of Tarantella provides a virtuosic showcase. The profusion of steps and the quick changes of direction this brief but explosive pas de deux requires typify the ways in which Balanchine expanded the traditional vocabulary of classical dance. Gottschalk, who lived from 1829 to 1869, was one of the first American composers to be recognized in Europe. His syncopated rhythms and jagged melodic lines incorporating elements of folk dancing foreshadowed the work of other American composers later in the 19th century.

Dance Theatre of Harlem II - Joyce Theater
Through February 11, 2012 -

Dance Theatre of Harlem II is comprised of sixteen young dance artists trained in the DTH style and developed in the spirit that transformed perceptions about ballet. Carrying on the legacy begun by Arthur Mitchell and Karel Shook when they founded Dance Theatre of Harlem forty-two years ago, the company, now under the artistic direction of Virginia Johnson, presents an eclectic and vibrant mix of neoclassical and contemporary ballets. For the Joyce season, the program includes a stirring new ballet by acclaimed choreographer Donald Byrd and Glinka Pas de Trois, a rarely seen Balanchine work.

Interplay - New York City Ballet
February 12, 2012 -

Morton Gould (1913-1996) was an American composer, conductor, and arranger whose lighter works generally drew on American subject matter and music. In his later works Gould concentrated on abstract, as opposed to programmatic or popular, works. His style became more contrapuntal, dissonant, and complex in its treatment of musical materials. Throughout his career Gould was a skillful orchestrator, sensitive to color and texture, and original in his combinations of instruments. His ballets include Fall River Legend, choreographed by Agnes de Mille, and Interplay, choreographed by Jerome Robbins, and he composed numerous scores for film, Broadway, and television.

The Seven Deadly Sins - New York City Ballet
Through February 12, 2012 -

Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht's ballet chant� (sung ballet) has a long association with George Balanchine and the New York City Ballet. Originally commissioned for Balanchine's experimental Les Ballets 1933, it starred Weill's wife, singer/actress Lotte Lenya and dancer Tilly Losch. In 1958, at the suggestion of Lincoln Kirstein, Balanchine revived the production for City Ballet, again starring Lotte Lenya and young dancer Allegra Kent, with a new English translation from the German by poets W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman.

The Seven Deadly (or Cardinal) Sins?Sloth, Pride, Anger, Gluttony, Lust, Greed, and Envy?do not appear as such in the Bible. Since early Christian times theologians incorporated them into Church teachings as examples of sins that led to other sins. In the Weill-Brecht collaboration, these forbidden human frailties are explored in a cabaret-style melding of music, song, dance, and spectacle. A sometimes bittersweet, sometimes sardonic morality play set in an imagined America (neither composer or librettist had yet been to the United States), it tells the story of two Annas (perhaps sisters, perhaps alter-egos) as they travel to seven cities to earn enough money so their family can "build a little home down by the Mississippi in Louisiana," encountering in each city one of the title sins. The two Annas are very different: Anna 1 sings "[Anna 2's] the one with looks, I'm realistic/She's just a little mad, my head's on straight?" Weill's score combines popular music from the 1920s and 30s (foxtrots, waltzes), with a barbershop quartet, marches and hymns into a melodic symphonic whole filled with the driving rhythms and unusual orchestrations that are a hallmark of his work. Brecht's libretto has been open to various interpretations. At the 1933 premiere, audiences could see a reflection of a decadent Berlin, the rise of Hitler and the Nazis, and the turmoil caused by the Great Depression. Over the years, others have viewed it as Brecht's critique of capitalism. One reviewer called the current City Ballet production a depiction of a "not-so-mythical America, a world in which for the sake of money, moral values are turned sharply on their head." Choreographer Lynne Taylor-Corbett has commented that in light of the country's on-going political, social, and economic polarizations, the nearly 80-year-old work continues to speak to and resonate with today's audiences.

Vienna Waltzes - New York City Ballet
Through February 12, 2012 -

The waltz became popular in the late 1700's. It was banned at first by some authorities who thought it immoral for couples to dance so closely, but by the mid-1800's, it was accepted everywhere. The faster Viennese form, characterized by swift, gliding turns, expressed the vivacity and brilliance of the Hapsburg court. The waltz was a dance form Balanchine revisited and explored often over his career, but never on as grand a scale as the 1977 Vienna Waltzes. Vienna Waltzes — Balanchine's homage to the pleasures and delights of an age that epitomized imperial grandeur — transforms from sylvan forest glen to sassy dance hall to glittering society cafe to, at last, a majestic mirrored ballroom through Rouben Ter-Arutunian's evolving scenery. The music selected for each section of the ballet is associated with the transformation of the waltz across society and over the years. The many elaborate costumes designed by Karinska are the last she created for New York City Ballet. For most of this century, first in Paris, and after 1938, in New York, Karinska, who left Russia after the October Revolution, designed and created many legendary costumes for Broadway, ballet and opera. As one of Balanchine's long-time collaborators, she was for many years New York City Ballet's principal costume-maker.

Zakouski - New York City Ballet
February 12, 2012 -

Zakouski is the Russian term for hors d'oeuvres. This ballet for two dancers set to four short works for violin and piano explores through vernacular gesture and movement the emotional terrain of its musical sources. Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (1891-1953) was a leading Soviet composer and a brilliant pianist. He left Russia in 1918 and lived in Germany and Paris for the next sixteen years, with frequent trips to America for concert appearances. In 1934 he settled in Moscow and composed prolifically until his death. Among his better known works are the ballet scores Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella, and The Prodigal Son, the opera Love for Three Oranges, the children's classic Peter and the Wolf, the film score and cantata for Alexander Nevsky, and the Classical Symphony. Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943), Russian composer, conductor and pianist. He studied at the St. Petersburg and Moscow Conservatories. His distinctive musical style is characterized by richness of melody, harmony and texture, a particular flair for vocal music and a sensitivity to Russian poetry. His Second Piano Concerto (1900-1) brought him international fame and is still one of the most performed orchestral works. After the Revolution of 1917 he made his home in America, where he gave regular concerts and recitals to support himself and his family. His extensive gramophone recordings preserve his own expressive piano style. He died at his home in Beverly Hills, California. Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), born in Russia, is acknowledged as one of the great composers of the twentieth century. His work encompassed styles as diverse as Romanticism, Neoclassicism and Serialism. His ballets for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes included The Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Apollo. His music has been used in over thirty ballets originating with New York City Ballet from 1948 through 1987, including Danses Concertantes, Orpheus, The Cage, Agon, Monumentum pro Gesualdo, Rubies, Symphony in Three Movements, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Concerto for Two Solo Pianos, Suite from Histoire du Soldat, Concertino, and Jeu de Cartes. Peter Ilyitch Tschaikovsky (1840-1893) studied at the Conservatory in St. Petersburg, where Balanchine later studied piano in addition to his studies in dance. Tschaikovsky is one of the most popular and influential of all romantic composers. His work is expressive, melodic, grand in scale, with rich orchestrations. His output was prodigious and included chamber works, symphonies, concerti for various instruments, operas and works for the piano. His creations for the ballet, composed in close partnership with Marius Petipa, include Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and The Sleeping Beauty.

Cloud Gate 2 - Joyce Theater
Through February 12, 2012 -

Renowned choreographer Lin Hwai-min founded Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan in 1973, creating a new form of dance that fused Eastern and Western cultures. In 1999, he founded Cloud Gate 2, a company making its New York debut at The Joyce with the work of remarkable international choreographers Bulareyaung Pagarlava, commissioned by the Martha Graham Company; Huang Yi, one of Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch, 2011"; Wu Kuo-chu, former Artistic Director of Tanztheater at Staatstheater Kassel, Germany; and Cheng Tsung-lung, winner of the Roma Choreography Competition 2011.

Romeo + Juliet - New York City Ballet
February 14, 2012 -

After The Nutcracker, Romeo and Juliet is perhaps the most choreographed ballet of the last 60 years. Most versions are set to Sergei Prokofiev's lush 1935 score, although some choreographers have used music by Tschaikovsky, Berlioz, and Delius. In May 2007, Romeo + Juliet, a sumptuous new production of Shakespeare's romantic tragedy choreographed by Peter Martins, entered the repertory of New York City Ballet. While Mr. Martin's work utilizes Prokofiev's score, the choreographer, following City Ballet tradition, has streamlined the action into two acts with one intermission (instead of the usual three acts). And also in NYCB tradition, his ballet focuses on speed and virtuosity and showcases young company dancers in the lead roles. Says Mr. Martins, "The production is to honor the 100th birthday of NYCB co-founder Lincoln Kirstein so we are also using teachers and student from the School of American Ballet, which Lincoln helped found, as well."

The costumes and scenery are designed by acclaimed Danish artist, Per Kirkeby, who also collaborated with Peter Martins on the choreographer's 1996 NYCB production of Swan Lake. Kirkeby's use of jewel tones and stained glass scenic effects pay homage to artist Georges Rouault and his work for George Balanchine in the 1929 Constructivist-inspired Ballets Russes production of Prodigal Son. So, too, does the movable unit set that allows scenes to change before one's eyes, the action moving seamlessly from a bustling town square to Juliet's bedroom, from a ball room to a moonlit balcony. But above all, this is a production filled with dance, drama, and movement: passionate pas de deux, group dances by turns stately and exuberant, and realistic sword fights that will take your breath away.

Ernani - Metropolitan Opera
February 14, 2012 -

Angela Meade takes center stage in Verdi's thrilling early gem. Marcello Giordani and Roberto DeBiasio share the role of her mismatched lover, and all-star Verdians Dmitri Hvorostovsky and Ferruccio Furlanetto round out the cast.

Allegro Brillante - New York City Ballet
February 15, 2012 -

Allegro Brillante is characterized by what Maria Tallchief (the ballerina on whom the bravura leading role was created) calls "an expansive Russian romanticism." The music's vigorous pace makes the steps appear even more difficult, but the ballet relies on strong dancing, precise timing, and breadth of gesture. Balanchine said: "It contains everything I know about the classical ballet in 13 minutes." Tschaikovsky's Third Piano Concerto was originally written as a symphony. But as it was nearing completion, the composer, dissatisfied with it, converted the first movement into a concert piece for piano and orchestra. Later on, he altered the andante and finale of the symphony in similar fashion.

Fancy Free - New York City Ballet
February 15, 2012 -

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), the gifted and versatile American conductor and composer of symphonic music and Broadway shows, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. At the age of seventeen he entered Harvard, went on to study at the Curtis Institute, and then to Tanglewood.

Serge Koussevitzky took great interest in his talent and promoted his conducting career, and his great chance came when, on short notice, he substituted brilliantly for Bruno Walter, who had become ill. He performed as a conductor and pianist, and lectured at universities and on television. His compositions ranged from the classical to the musical stage, and included Mass, Kaddish, West Side Story (again in collaboration with Jerome Robbins), Candide, and The Age of Anxiety. He was the first native-born American to become conductor of the New York Philharmonic, and he conducted around the world.

Romeo + Juliet - New York City Ballet
February 16, 2012 -

After The Nutcracker, Romeo and Juliet is perhaps the most choreographed ballet of the last 60 years. Most versions are set to Sergei Prokofiev's lush 1935 score, although some choreographers have used music by Tschaikovsky, Berlioz, and Delius. In May 2007, Romeo + Juliet, a sumptuous new production of Shakespeare's romantic tragedy choreographed by Peter Martins, entered the repertory of New York City Ballet. While Mr. Martin's work utilizes Prokofiev's score, the choreographer, following City Ballet tradition, has streamlined the action into two acts with one intermission (instead of the usual three acts). And also in NYCB tradition, his ballet focuses on speed and virtuosity and showcases young company dancers in the lead roles. Says Mr. Martins, "The production is to honor the 100th birthday of NYCB co-founder Lincoln Kirstein so we are also using teachers and student from the School of American Ballet, which Lincoln helped found, as well."

The costumes and scenery are designed by acclaimed Danish artist, Per Kirkeby, who also collaborated with Peter Martins on the choreographer's 1996 NYCB production of Swan Lake. Kirkeby's use of jewel tones and stained glass scenic effects pay homage to artist Georges Rouault and his work for George Balanchine in the 1929 Constructivist-inspired Ballets Russes production of Prodigal Son. So, too, does the movable unit set that allows scenes to change before one's eyes, the action moving seamlessly from a bustling town square to Juliet's bedroom, from a ball room to a moonlit balcony. But above all, this is a production filled with dance, drama, and movement: passionate pas de deux, group dances by turns stately and exuberant, and realistic sword fights that will take your breath away.

Agon - New York City Ballet
February 17, 2012 -

Agon is the Greek word for contest; the movements of the ballet are named after French court dances. The score was commissioned by New York City Ballet with funds from the Rockefeller Foundation and dedicated to Lincoln Kirstein and Balanchine by the composer. Balanchine and Stravinsky together designed the structure of the ballet during the creation of the music. The outline for the score specifies in detail, with exact timings, the basic movements for 12 dancers clad in simple black and white costumes.

Fancy Free - New York City Ballet
February 17, 2012 -

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), the gifted and versatile American conductor and composer of symphonic music and Broadway shows, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. At the age of seventeen he entered Harvard, went on to study at the Curtis Institute, and then to Tanglewood.

Serge Koussevitzky took great interest in his talent and promoted his conducting career, and his great chance came when, on short notice, he substituted brilliantly for Bruno Walter, who had become ill. He performed as a conductor and pianist, and lectured at universities and on television. His compositions ranged from the classical to the musical stage, and included Mass, Kaddish, West Side Story (again in collaboration with Jerome Robbins), Candide, and The Age of Anxiety. He was the first native-born American to become conductor of the New York Philharmonic, and he conducted around the world.

Tschaikovsky Suite No. 3 - New York City Ballet
February 17, 2012 -

Balanchine's first setting of music from Tschaikovsky's third suite for orchestra was created in 1947, when Ballet Theatre commissioned him to choreograph the theme and variations that constitute the final movement. Called simply Theme and Variations, the work is a riveting display of classical technique that has become a staple of the ballet repertory. In 1970, Balanchine decided to choreograph the entire suite, incorporating Theme and Variations as the fourth and final movement with only minor revisions. With scenery and costumes by Nicolas Benois, the first three movements are danced in a softly-lit ballroom. The women are dressed in long-flowing dresses and their hair is unbound. In the opening movement, the corps of women dance barefoot. Peter Ilyitch Tschaikovsky (1840-1893) studied at the Conservatory in St. Petersburg, where Balanchine later studied piano in addition to his studies in dance. Tschaikovsky is one of the most popular and influential of all romantic composers. His work is expressive, melodic, grand in scale, with rich orchestrations. His output was prodigious and included chamber works, symphonies, concerti for various instruments, operas and works for the piano. His creations for the ballet, composed in close partnership with Marius Petipa, include Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and The Sleeping Beauty.

Agon - New York City Ballet
February 18, 2012 -

Agon is the Greek word for contest; the movements of the ballet are named after French court dances. The score was commissioned by New York City Ballet with funds from the Rockefeller Foundation and dedicated to Lincoln Kirstein and Balanchine by the composer. Balanchine and Stravinsky together designed the structure of the ballet during the creation of the music. The outline for the score specifies in detail, with exact timings, the basic movements for 12 dancers clad in simple black and white costumes.

Interplay - New York City Ballet
February 18, 2012 -

Morton Gould (1913-1996) was an American composer, conductor, and arranger whose lighter works generally drew on American subject matter and music. In his later works Gould concentrated on abstract, as opposed to programmatic or popular, works. His style became more contrapuntal, dissonant, and complex in its treatment of musical materials. Throughout his career Gould was a skillful orchestrator, sensitive to color and texture, and original in his combinations of instruments. His ballets include Fall River Legend, choreographed by Agnes de Mille, and Interplay, choreographed by Jerome Robbins, and he composed numerous scores for film, Broadway, and television.

Romeo + Juliet - New York City Ballet
February 18, 2012 -

After The Nutcracker, Romeo and Juliet is perhaps the most choreographed ballet of the last 60 years. Most versions are set to Sergei Prokofiev's lush 1935 score, although some choreographers have used music by Tschaikovsky, Berlioz, and Delius. In May 2007, Romeo + Juliet, a sumptuous new production of Shakespeare's romantic tragedy choreographed by Peter Martins, entered the repertory of New York City Ballet. While Mr. Martin's work utilizes Prokofiev's score, the choreographer, following City Ballet tradition, has streamlined the action into two acts with one intermission (instead of the usual three acts). And also in NYCB tradition, his ballet focuses on speed and virtuosity and showcases young company dancers in the lead roles. Says Mr. Martins, "The production is to honor the 100th birthday of NYCB co-founder Lincoln Kirstein so we are also using teachers and student from the School of American Ballet, which Lincoln helped found, as well."

The costumes and scenery are designed by acclaimed Danish artist, Per Kirkeby, who also collaborated with Peter Martins on the choreographer's 1996 NYCB production of Swan Lake. Kirkeby's use of jewel tones and stained glass scenic effects pay homage to artist Georges Rouault and his work for George Balanchine in the 1929 Constructivist-inspired Ballets Russes production of Prodigal Son. So, too, does the movable unit set that allows scenes to change before one's eyes, the action moving seamlessly from a bustling town square to Juliet's bedroom, from a ball room to a moonlit balcony. But above all, this is a production filled with dance, drama, and movement: passionate pas de deux, group dances by turns stately and exuberant, and realistic sword fights that will take your breath away.

Tschaikovsky Suite No. 3 - New York City Ballet
February 18, 2012 -

Balanchine's first setting of music from Tschaikovsky's third suite for orchestra was created in 1947, when Ballet Theatre commissioned him to choreograph the theme and variations that constitute the final movement. Called simply Theme and Variations, the work is a riveting display of classical technique that has become a staple of the ballet repertory. In 1970, Balanchine decided to choreograph the entire suite, incorporating Theme and Variations as the fourth and final movement with only minor revisions. With scenery and costumes by Nicolas Benois, the first three movements are danced in a softly-lit ballroom. The women are dressed in long-flowing dresses and their hair is unbound. In the opening movement, the corps of women dance barefoot. Peter Ilyitch Tschaikovsky (1840-1893) studied at the Conservatory in St. Petersburg, where Balanchine later studied piano in addition to his studies in dance. Tschaikovsky is one of the most popular and influential of all romantic composers. His work is expressive, melodic, grand in scale, with rich orchestrations. His output was prodigious and included chamber works, symphonies, concerti for various instruments, operas and works for the piano. His creations for the ballet, composed in close partnership with Marius Petipa, include Swan Lake, The Nutcracker and The Sleeping Beauty.

Ernani - Metropolitan Opera
February 18, 2012 -

Angela Meade takes center stage in Verdi's thrilling early gem. Marcello Giordani and Roberto DeBiasio share the role of her mismatched lover, and all-star Verdians Dmitri Hvorostovsky and Ferruccio Furlanetto round out the cast.

Vanessa Anspaugh / Jen Rosenblit - Armed Guard Garden; In Mouth - New York Live Arts
Through February 18, 2012 -

Vanessa Anspaugh asks what exists before we name it? Does the map precede the territory? Questioning how we maintain or reinforce difference between "the garden and the world", between your land and my land, between human and animal or Self and Other? On borders, back-roads, and in-betweens, Armed Guard Garden pits intimate gesture against awkward desire and perverted repulsion. An ensemble work created with performers Aretha Aoki, Molly Lieber, Mary Read and Dramaturge Susan Mar Landau.

Jen Rosenblit uses absurdity as a constant point of departure and welcomes it as a performative culture rather than an aesthetic. Working with performer and long-term collaborator Addys Gonzalez, Rosenblit tests the sensory differences of focus and distraction. In Mouth will utilize movement and sound vocabularies to highlight the visible differences between Rosenblit and Gonzalez.

Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo - Joyce Theater
Through February 19, 2012 -

Under the Presidency of H.R.H the Princess of Hanover, Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo, Monaco's official dance company, makes its Joyce debut with two riveting works created by celebrated choreographer-director Jean-Christophe Maillot. Opus 40, a beautifully-staged piece with sets and costumes by the American painter George Condo and music by the incomparable Meredith Monk, portrays emotion and mystery captured in structured frames. Also on the program is Part I from Altro Canto, a 2006 work with costumes by designer Karl Lagerfeld and a set by Rolf Sachs. Performed to the passionate music of Monteverdi and others, Altro Canto features constant, intense movement punctuated by startling jolts of energy.

CSI: The Experience - Discovery Times Square
Through March 04, 2012 - New York

Play the role of a crime scene investigator at CSI: The Experience! As the latest recruit in the world of forensic science, guests are guided by videos featuring CSI: cast members and real-life forensic scientists. Throughout the exhibition you must examine blood types, while matching DNA to potential suspects in order to complete the investigation process and solve the crime. Complete with 3 Crime Scenes, 15 Forensic Lab Stations, and dazzling special effects, this hands-on experience is sure to plunge exhibit goers deep into the science of solving crimes.

Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times - Discovery Times Square
Through April 15, 2012 - New York

Take a fascinating archaeological journey through the Holy Land. This rare exhibit features the famed Dead Sea Scrolls, a stone from the Western Wall from the Second Temple in Jerusalem and more than 500 never-before-seen artifacts from biblical times. Experience firsthand the traditions, beliefs and iconic objects of ancient Israel that impact world religions today.


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