Follow Us  
Things to do this week in NYC Jan 12-Jan 19: Museums
Post Feedback | Printer-Friendly | Send Article to a Friend
January 12, 2013 - by CG Directory Editor

Featured Listings
American Museum of Natural History Photos American Museum of Natural History· A museum for the 21st century, with a rich and storied past ...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum· Frank Lloyd Wright's masterpiece of modern architecture is h...

Hasted Kraeutler· International contemporary art from emerging and established...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)· One of the world's finest collections of modern and contempo...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Museum of Sex· This museum presents the history, evolution, and the cultura...

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Designing Nature - The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

"Rinpa" is a modern term that refers to a distinctive style of Japanese pictorial and applied arts that arose in the early seventeenth century and has continued through modern times. Literally meaning "school of Korin," Rinpa derives its name from Ogata Korin (1658-1716), a celebrated painter from Kyoto. It embraces art marked by a bold, graphic abbreviation of natural motifs, frequent reference to traditional court literature and poetry, the lavish use of expensive mineral and metallic pigments, incorporation of calligraphy into painting compositions, and innovative experimentation with new brush techniques. The exhibition will feature more than one hundred brilliantly executed works of art created in Japan by the Rinpa-school artists. It will be held in two rotations, the first opening on May 26, 2012; the second on September 12, 2012. Highlighting the school's most prominent proponents, this two-part presentation will trace the development of the Rinpa aesthetic and will demonstrate how its style continued to influence artists throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Comprising more than fifty works from the Museum's own holdings supplemented by forty-five loans from public and private collections on the east coast, the exhibition will include many masters' renowned works in a variety of media: painting, textiles, lacquerware, and ceramics.

The Deutsche Bank Series at the Guggenheim: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

Gabriel Orozco's Asterisms, the final project in Deutsche Guggenheim's commissioning program, is a two-part sculptural and photographic installation comprising thousands of items of detritus Orozco has gathered at two sites -- a playing field near the artist's home in New York and a protected coastal biosphere in Baja California, Mexico, that is also the repository for flows of industrial and commercial waste from across the Pacific Ocean. The two related bodies of work provocatively oscillate between the macro and the micro and invoke several of the artist's recurring motifs, including the traces of erosion, poetic encounters with mundane materials, and the ever-present tension between nature and culture. The show also underscores and amplifies Orozco's subtle practice of subjecting the world to personal, idiosyncratic systems. The exhibition is organized by Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, and Joan Young, Director, Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and is accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue. This exhibition is made possible by Deutsche Bank. The Leadership Committee for Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Wade Guyton OS - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

Over the past decade, New York-based artist Wade Guyton (b. 1972) has pioneered a groundbreaking body of work that explores our changing relationships to images and artworks through the use of common digital technologies, such as the desktop computer, scanner, and inkjet printer. Guyton's purposeful misuse of these tools to make paintings and drawings results in beautiful accidents that relate to daily lives now punctuated by misprinted photos and blurred images on our phone and computer screens. Comprising more than eighty works dating from 1999 to the present, Guyton's first midcareer survey features a dramatic, non-chronological design in which staggered rows of parallel walls confront the viewer like the layered pages of a book or stacked windows on a monitor. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings, photography, and sculpture, and concludes with two spectacular new canvases, stretching up to fifty feet in length, which Guyton created specifically for the Whitney's Marcel Breuer-designed building. The title, Wade Guyton OS employs the common acronym for a computer's "operating system," linking Guyton's art to the technologies of our time.

Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 13, 2013 - New York

Every holiday season, the Morgan displays Charles Dickens's original manuscript of A Christmas Carol in Pierpont Morgan's historic Library. Dickens wrote his iconic tale in a six-week flurry of activity, beginning in October 1843 and ending in time for Christmas publication. He had the manuscript bound in red morocco as a gift for his solicitor, Thomas Mitton. The manuscript then passed through several owners before Pierpont Morgan acquired it in the 1890s.

Candid - The Rubin Museum
Through January 14, 2013 - New York

Homai Vyarawalla (1913-2012) was India's first female photojournalist. This exhibition, the first on Vyarawalla outside of India, will present her photography from the late 1930s to 1970, and narrate her extraordinary life with a biographical film and ephemera from her career. From early in her career, Homai Vyarawalla documented key events from the generation around Independence, including the historic meeting of Gandhi and the Congress Committee on the 1947 plan for partition, and she recorded the visits to India of world leaders and dignitaries including Queen Elizabeth, Jacqueline Kennedy, Ho Chi Minh, and Zhou Enlai. She was revered in India and her recent death at age 98 generated tributes around the world. The exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Alkazi Foundation for the Arts in New Delhi.

Near-Earth Objects with Dan Yeomans - American Museum of Natural History
January 14, 2013 - New York City

An impact by a large comet or asteroid has the potential to end civilization. Yet these near-Earth objects also offer tantalizing clues to the solar system's origins and, someday, could serve as stepping-stones to space exploration. Donald Yeomans introduces the science of near-Earth objects, its history, applications, and ongoing quest to find near-Earth objects before they find us. Book signing to follow.

Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier) - Frick Collection
Through January 20, 2013 - New York

This fall The Frick Collection will present Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier). The painting has not left its home institution, the Norton Simon Museum, in Pasadena, CA, in nearly forty years, making this a particularly rare and exciting viewing opportunity for East Coast audiences. The exhibition aims to shed light on the master's transformative contribution to this art form, incorporating the results of newly performed technical research to answer questions about the dating of Antico's works, his technique, and his development as an innovative artist. Jointly organized by the National Gallery of Art and The Frick Collection, the exhibition opened in the fall of 2011 in Washington, D.C., before traveling to New York City the following spring. The exhibition is curated by Eleonora Luciano, Associate Curator of Sculpture at the National Gallery of Art, in collaboration with Denise Allen, Curator at The Frick Collection. The accompanying catalogue is written by an international team of scholars including Eleonora Luciano, Denise Allen, and Claudia Kryza-Gersch, Curator of Italian Sculpture at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. It will be the first independent monograph in English to focus on the artist and the first comprehensive presentation of his works in color.

Picasso Black and White - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 23, 2013 - New York

Picasso Black and White marks the first major exhibition to focus on the recurrent motif of black and white throughout Pablo Picasso's career. Surveying his oeuvre from 1904 to 1971, Picasso Black and White examines the artist's lifelong exploration of a black-and-white palette through approximately 115 paintings and a selection of sculptures and works on paper. The exhibition thematically traces the artist's unique vision throughout his work, including early monochromatic blue and rose paintings, gray-toned Cubist canvases, elegant and austere neoclassical portraits and nudes, Surrealist-inspired figures, forceful and somber scenes depicting the atrocities of war, allegorical still lifes, vivid interpretations of art-historical masterpieces, and the electric, highly sexualized canvases of Picasso's last years. The exhibition includes significant loans drawn from private collections, including many from the Picasso family; from museums across Europe and the United States; and from numerous public and private European and American collections, many of which have not been exhibited or published before. The exhibition is organized by Carmen Gimenez, Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of Twentieth-Century Art, with assistance from Karole Vail, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Picasso Black and White is sponsored by Bank of America. Major support is provided by the Picasso Black and White Leadership Committee, with Christina and Robert C. Baker, Chairs; Acquavella Galleries; J. Ira and Nicki Harris Foundation; The Lauder Foundation-Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund; Phyllis and William Mack; Stephen and Nan Swid; and Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed. Additional support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, and the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Faking It - Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 27, 2013 - New York

This international loan exhibition traces the history of manipulated photography from the 1840s through the early 1990s, when the computer replaced manual techniques as the dominant means of doctoring photographs. Most of the two hundred pictures on view were altered after the negative was exposed -- through photomontage, combination printing, overpainting, retouching, or, as is often the case, a blend of several processes. In every instance, the final image differs significantly from what stood before the camera at any given moment.

Bound Unbound: Lin Tianmiao - Asia Society and Museum
Through January 27, 2013 - New York

One of Lin Tianmiao's clearest recollections of her childhood in China was helping her mother sew clothes for the family. When she returned to China after spending eight years living in New York, she was inspired by this memory to create a technique she calls thread winding, where she winds silk or cotton thread around an object until it is completely covered and ultimately transformed. She used this in one of her first major works called The Proliferation of Thread Winding in 1995, which began her career as an artist and is included in the exhibition. Her use of the technique continues today and can be seen in such recent works as All the Same.

Beatrix Potter: The Picture Letters - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 27, 2013 - New York

This exhibition tells how a largely self-taught artist and writer used a series of private letters to develop some of the most vividly depicted animal characters in all of children's literature. Beatrix Potter: The Picture Letters brings together for the first time twenty-two letters from important American private holdings as well as from three major institutional collections: the Morgan, the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, and the Cotsen Children's Library at Princeton University. Illustrated with pen-drawn vignettes, the letters are displayed with more than eighty related items, including printed books, original artwork, manuscripts, and early children's toys and games inspired by Potter's stories.

Holiday Express: Toys and Trains from the Jerni Collection - New-York Historical Society
Through January 27, 2013 - New York

Magnificent model trains, train stations and sheds, bridges and tunnels, carousels and Ferris wheels -- all populated with toy figurines in colorful nineteenth-century dress, will be on view this holiday season at the New-York Historical Society, in the first museum exhibition of selections from the renowned Jerni Collection.

Born Out of Necessity - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 28, 2013 - Midtown

Showcasing objects that adhere to the traditional view of design as a tool for problem-solving, Born out of Necessity offers close examination of the problems themselves -- whether urgent, foreseen, or imagined. From objects that respond to pressing needs in developing countries to new solutions that are tailored to the urban environment, the exhibition examines how design intervenes across a range of experiences, including medical emergencies and natural disasters. Other objects demonstrate how products created to address specific challenges for people with disabilities can provide solutions that improve everyone's life. Drawing on the narrative power of design, Born out of Necessity addresses a host of complex cultural developments, such as the need to incorporate environmental responsibility in everyday life, our attempts to marry ancient religious beliefs with contemporary mores, and the desire to anticipate and prevent technological and ecological quagmires.

Eyes Closed/Eyes Open: Recent Acquisitions in Drawings - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 28, 2013 - New York

This exhibition is culled from the past two years of acquisitions by MoMA's Department of Drawings. Anchored in various explorations of the late 1960s, these works reveal a range of creative, intellectual, and critical impulses -- whether serving as an intimate record of the artist's practice, or purposefully crafted to address an assumed wider audience. German artist Franz Erhard Walther created a suite of "work drawings" to illustrate (both functionally and conceptually) his First Work Series (1963-69), a group of 58 interactive sculptural objects, on display at the Museum for the first time since their original presentation here in 1969. While roughly contemporary, Willem de Kooning's "Eyes-Closed" drawings of 1966, which were sketched blindly by the artist, offer a counterpoint to Walther's project and seem to embrace the traditional role of drawing as a tool of private expression, while Martha Rosler's Bringing the War Home: House Beautiful photomontage series of 1967-72 turns a critical eye to the era's sociopolitical context and expanding media sphere.

Abolishing Slavery: The 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation - New-York Historical Society
Through January 31, 2013 - New York

The New-York Historical Society commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation with a display of rare documents from the Gilder Lehrman Collection, including an important 1864 printing of the Emancipation Proclamation and a congressional copy of the Thirteenth Amendment resolution, both bearing the signature of Abraham Lincoln.

Museum as Hub: Walking Drifting Dragging - New Museum
Through February 03, 2013 - New York

"Walking Drifting Dragging" is a one-month-long presentation of works by four emerging artists/collectives: Eunji Cho (Seoul), Ellie Ga (New York), Paulo Nazareth (Belo Horizonte, Brazil), and Mriganka Madhukaillya and Sonal Jain of Desire Machine Collective (Guwahati, India). The artists share a common preoccupation with walking, roaming, and drifting--moving slowly, close to the ground--and documenting their travels within highly personal terms that blend cartography with memory. All four have embarked on epic journeys, such as crossing an entire continent on foot or floating through the darkness of the Arctic for months--each one motivated by a different impulse or political perspective. Collectively, the artists work against contemporary notions of immediacy and access in a globalized world where any data point appears to be a search away and other cultures can seem legible with a quick round-trip. Their works dramatize distance between countries and cultures, across borders and time zones, to demonstrate how layered and complex a local stretch of terrain can be. "Walking Drifting Dragging" is presented in collaboration with the Museum as Hub and organized by Lauren Cornell, Curator of the 2015 Triennial, Digital Projects, and Museum as Hub.

Fantasy and Invention: Rosso Fiorentino and Sixteenth-Century Florentine Drawing - Morgan Library & Museum
Through February 03, 2013 - New York

The Morgan presents this exhibition on the occasion of an important loan from the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore: Rosso Fiorentino's Holy Family with the Young Saint John the Baptist. Executed around 1520 and one of only three paintings by the artist in America, the Holy Family is the centerpiece of this rich and focused exhibition of drawings and artists' letters. Complementing Rosso's striking painting are nearly twenty Florentine High Renaissance and Mannerist drawings from the Morgan's collection, including major examples by Andrea del Sarto; Rosso's contemporaries Jacopo Pontormo, Giorgio Vasari, and Francesco Salviati, all of whom also worked in Andrea del Sarto's studio; and other preeminent draftsmen of the period such as Michelangelo, Baccio Bandinelli, Agnolo Bronzino, and Alessandro Allori. A rare drawing by Rosso, on loan from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is also on view.

The World of D.D. and Leslie Tillett - Museum of the City of New York
Through February 03, 2013 - New York

The World of D.D. and Leslie Tillett is the first retrospective of the work of textile designers D.D. Tillett (1917-2008) and Leslie Tillett (1915-1992), two important figures in the history of post-war American design. The exhibition will introduce the work of these remarkable designers to a new generation.

New Photography 2012 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 04, 2013 - Midtown

New Photography 2012 presents five artists -- Michele Abeles, Birdhead (Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), Anne Collier, Zoe Crosher, and Shirana Shahbazi -- whose varied techniques and backgrounds represent the diversity and vitality of photography today.

Raw/Cooked: Duron Jackson - Brooklyn Museum
Through February 10, 2013 - Brooklyn

Jackson's multimedia installation evokes a private library or reading room, where viewers are invited to contemplate themes of race and power embedded in American history and culture. A minimalist white cube chair is situated at the center of a carpet, both constructed by the artist from black-and-white dominoes. Jackson's Blackboard Paintings -- large-scale geometric abstractions rendered in graphite and blackboard paint -- cover the surrounding walls. These works present abstracted aerial views of specific American prisons. Jackson juxtaposes his abstract works with Malvina Hoffman's early modern sculptural portrait, Senegalese Soldier. Drawn from the Museum's permanent collection, Hoffman's larger-than-life-sized bust stands at the center of the installation. In Rumination, Jackson brings together historical and contemporary cultural representations to explore the inter-related histories of incarceration, surveillance, and control.

From Farm to City: Staten Island, 1661-2012 - Museum of the City of New York
Through February 10, 2013 - New York

From Farm to City: Staten Island, 1661-2012 highlights the history of changing land use on the island that has been an important part of the life of New York and its harbor for over 350 years. The exhibition illuminates Staten Island's varied history as home to farms and fishing ports, small towns and suburbs, resorts and estates, industry and business, parks and wetlands, and dynamic and diverse downtowns that continue to reinvent themselves. New panoramic color photographs by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao capture the varied and often striking vistas of Staten Island today.

A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright's Usonian House and Pavilion - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through February 13, 2013 - New York

On October 22, 1953, Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright opened in New York on the site where the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum would eventually be built. Two Frank Lloyd Wright-designed buildings were constructed specifically to house the exhibition: a temporary pavilion made of glass, fiberboard, and pipe columns; and a 1,700-square-foot, fully furnished, two-bedroom, model Usonian house representing Wright's organic solution for modest, middle-class dwellings.

Doris Duke's Shangri La - Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art - Museum of Arts & Design
Through February 17, 2013 - New York

Exploring the extraordinary dialogue between Islamic tradition and Western modernity that shaped the fabled Honolulu residence of the philanthropist Doris Duke, Doris Duke's Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art features large-scale newly commissioned photos of the five-acre property by Tim Street-Porter and archival materials on the travel and research that led to the creation of Duke's home and the growth of her collection over 60 years, in addition to a selection of works from her collection, never before seen outside her home--ceramics, furniture, textiles, and jewelry inlaid with precious gems from Spain, North Africa, Central and South Asia, and the Middle East, including objects dating from the early first millennium B.C.E.--along with new works by six contemporary artists of Islamic heritage who participated in Shangri La's Contemporary Artists Residency program. These Shangri La- inspired works include calligraphic pieces by Mohamed Zakariya that evoke the physical landscape surrounding the home; vivid, large-scale projections that capture the home's confluence of American and Muslim cultures by Shahzia Sikander; and lantern-like metal sculptures of rockets and missiles that speak of both opulence and violence by Afruz Amighi, among others.

George Bellows - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through February 18, 2013 - New York

George Bellows (1882-1925) was regarded as one of America's greatest artists when he died, at the age of forty-two, from a ruptured appendix. Bellows's early fame rested on his powerful depictions of boxing matches and gritty scenes of New York City's tenement life, but he also painted cityscapes, seascapes, war scenes, and portraits, and made illustrations and lithographs that addressed many of the social, political, and cultural issues of the day. Featuring some one hundred works from Bellows's extensive oeuvre, this landmark loan exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of the artist's career in nearly half a century. It invites the viewer to experience the dynamic and challenging decades of the early twentieth century through the eyes of a brilliant observer.

John Rogers: American Stories - New-York Historical Society
Through February 18, 2013 - New York

John Rogers: American Stories is the first full retrospective of the most popular American sculptor John Rogers (1829-1904). An astute and tireless maker and marketer of artworks from the beginning of the Civil War to the end of the Gilded Age, Rogers sold more than 80,000 narrative figural groups in plaster, reaching the American public en masse and addressing the issues that most touched their lives. His arresting and memorable subjects included scenes from the front lines and the home front of the Civil War, insightful commentaries on domestic life, and dramatic episodes from the stage and literature.

The Landmarks of New York - New-York Historical Society
Through February 18, 2013 - New York

The Landmarks of New York is an exhibition which explores the history of New York as revealed by its historical structures. The exhibition's ninety photographs of New York landmarks, including thirty newly donated by former New York City Landmarks Commissioner Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, are critical documents that chronicle the city's past from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. As the city grew, single family houses were replaced by apartment buildings and then skyscrapers; agriculture replaced manufacturing, which was supplanted by commerce and the movement of goods and services. All of these structures tell the story of New York's journey from a small colonized village to a world class city.

Nature and the American Vision: The Hudson River School - New-York Historical Society
Through February 21, 2013 - New York

After a national tour, the forty-five iconic works, including Thomas Cole's five-part series The Course of Empire and other masterworks by Cole, John F. Kensett, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper F. Cropsey, Asher B. Durand and others will once again be on display at the New-York Historical Society.

GO: a community-curated open studio project - Brooklyn Museum
Through February 24, 2013 - Brooklyn

Brooklyn is home to more artists than anywhere else in the United States, making it the creative capital of the art world. GO: a community-curated open studio project is a borough-wide initiative designed to foster personal exchange between Brooklyn-based artists, their communities, and the Brooklyn Museum. During GO, 1,708 Brooklyn-based artists opened their studios to the community on September 8 and 9. An estimated 18,000 people made approximately 147,000 studio visits in order to nominate artists for inclusion in a group exhibition to be held at the Museum. Based on the ten community-nominated artists, Museum curators selected five artists to be featured in the exhibition, opening on Target First Saturday, December 1, 2012. The exhibition features work by Adrian Coleman, Oliver Jeffers, Naomi Safran-Hon, Gabrielle Watson, and Yeon Ji Yoo. Organized by the Museum's Managing Curator of Exhibitions, Sharon Matt Atkins, and Chief of Technology, Shelley Bernstein, GO is inspired by two established programs: ArtPrize, an annual publicly juried art competition in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and the long tradition of open studio weekends held each year in the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Williamsburg, Greenpoint, DUMBO, Gowanus, Red Hook, and Bushwick.

Daniel Brush - Blue Steel Gold Light - Museum of Arts & Design
Through February 24, 2013 - New York

Over the past 40 years, Daniel Brush has created an oeuvre unparalleled in contemporary American art--from large-scale painted canvases to gold-domed containers encrusted with gold granules so miniscule they must be fused with microscopic precision. Daniel Brush: Blue Steel Gold Light, opening October 16, 2012, brings together for the first time works from throughout Brush's career, including examples of his poetic paintings and drawings, a selection of his most significant steel and gold wall sculptures, jewelry made from plastic, aluminum, steel, and precious gems, and some of his earliest gold-granulated objects. The exhibition will be installed on MAD's second-floor galleries--the first time a single living artist has commanded that entire floor, which includes the Tiffany & Co. Foundation Jewelry Gallery.

The Art of Scent 1889-2012 - Museum of Arts & Design
Through February 24, 2013 - New York

The Art of Scent 1889-2012 is the first major museum exhibition to recognize scent as a major medium of artistic creation and fifteen artists who work in this medium. The exhibition focuses on twelve works made between 1889 and 2012, and will include Jicky, created by Aime Guerlain in 1889; Ernest Beaux's Chanel No 5 from 1921; Jean-Claude Ellena's Osmanthe Yunnan from 2006; and Daniela Andrier's Untitled, created in 2010.

Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 25, 2013 - New York

Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde brings together some of the most iconic works from the period as well as works recently discovered or reevaluated by new scholarship. A significant number are already part of MoMA's collection, while others are on loan from important public collections in Japan and the United States. Artists in the exhibition include artist collectives such as Jikken Kobo (Experimental Workshop), Hi Red Center (Takamatsu Jiro, Akasegawa Genpei, Nakanishi Natsuyuki), and Group Ongaku (Group Music); critical artistic figures such as Okamoto Taro, Nakamura Hiroshi, Ay-O, Yoko Ono, Shiomi Mieko, and Tetsumi Kudo; photographers Moriyama Daido, Hosoe Eikoh, and Tomatsu Shomei; illustrators and graphic designers Yokoo Tadanori, Sugiura Kohei, and Awazu Kiyoshi; and architects Tange Kenzo, Isozaki Arata, and Kurokawa Kisho, among others.

Audubon: National Treasures - Birds of Winter for The Birds of America (1827-38) - New-York Historical Society
Through March 04, 2013 - New York

Looking at these four watercolors you are enjoying an experience similar to that of John James Audubon's (1785-1851) original subscribers to The Birds of America (1827-38). The watercolors are rotated on a quarterly basis to limit the potential damage caused by their exposure, ensuring that these national treasures are available to future generations.

Matisse: In Search of True Painting - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through March 17, 2013 - New York

Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was one of the most acclaimed artists working in France during the first half of the twentieth century. The critic Clement Greenberg, writing in The Nation in 1949, called him a "self-assured master who can no more help painting well than breathing." Unbeknownst to many, painting had rarely come easily to Matisse. Throughout his career, he questioned, repainted, and reevaluated his work. He used his completed canvases as tools, repeating compositions in order to compare effects, gauge his progress, and, as he put it, "push further and deeper into true painting." While this manner of working with pairs, trios, and series is certainly not unique to Matisse, his need to progress methodically from one painting to the next is striking. Matisse: In Search of True Painting presents this particular aspect of Matisse's painting process by showcasing forty-nine vibrantly colored canvases. For Matisse, the process of creation was not simply a means to an end but a dimension of his art that was as important as the finished canvas.

Sinister Pop - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

Sinister Pop presents an inventive take on the Museum's rich and diverse holdings of Pop art from the movement's inception in the early 1960s through its aftershocks a decade later. Although Pop art often calls to mind a celebration of postwar consumer culture, this exhibition focuses on Pop's darker side, as it distorts and critiques the American dream. Themes of exaggerated consumption, film noir and the depiction of women in art, the dystopic American landscape, and the intersection of popular culture and politics, are explored through works by acknowledged masters such as Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenburg, Ed Ruscha, and Andy Warhol, as well as by many artists not traditionally associated with Pop whose art may be understood within its wider field of reference. These include William Eggleston, Peter Saul, Christina Ramberg, and Vija Celmins, among others.

Dark and Deadpan: Pop in TV and the Movies - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

From Andy Warhol's commercial for Schrafft's restaurants to Sherman Price's film The Imp-Probable Mr. Weegee, starring Weegee as a crazy photographer, footage of the moon landing, and George Kuchar's mock Hollywood melodrama HOLD ME WHILE I'M NAKED, this exhibition brings together rarely seen films, advertisements, and political campaign messages that reflect the extravagant yet deadpan excess of Pop. Together they reveal the central role played by television and cinema in articulating the excitement, anxiety, and desire underlying both Pop art and popular culture in the 1960s.

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s - Museum of the City of New York
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s showcases six Depression-era expositions that brought visions of a brighter future to tens of millions of Americans. As many Americans still waited on bread lines, fairs in Chicago (1933/34), San Diego (1935/36), Dallas (1936), Cleveland (1936/37), San Francisco (1939/40), and New York (1939/40) foretold much of what would become commonplace in postwar America--from highways and the spread of suburbia to modernist skyscrapers and products such as electric toasters, nylon stockings, and television. The fairs looked forward to an era of prosperity, when ingenuity and innovation would transform not only American cities but also the everyday lives of American citizens. Visitors will see sleek, modern furniture and appliances of the era, vintage footage from the fairs, and futuristic drawings of the New York World's Fair's buildings from the Museum's collection.

Playing with Fire - 50 Years of Contemporary Glass - Museum of Arts & Design
Through April 07, 2013 - New York

MAD celebrates the 50th anniversary of the birth of the American Studio Glass movement with Playing with Fire: 50 Years of Contemporary Glass, which will feature more than 100 works of glass from the collection, as well as promised gifts, and additional contemporary works on loan. Ever since 1962, when a legendary workshop led by renowned glass artist Harvey Littleton demonstrated the potential of glassblowing as a medium available to individual artists, artists and designers have continually pushed the material in new directions and used the complex, fragile, and highly versatile nature of the material to create an astonishing diversity of works.

African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through April 14, 2013 - New York

This exhibition highlights the specific African artifacts acquired by the New York avant-garde and its most influential patrons during the 1910s and 1920s. Reflecting on the dynamism of New York's art scene during the years that followed the 1913 Armory Show, the exhibition brings together African works from the collections of many key individuals of the period such as Alfred Stieglitz, Marius de Zayas, John Quinn, Louise and Walter Arensberg, Alain LeRoy Locke, and Eugene and Agnes Meyer.

Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 15, 2013 - New York

In 1912, in several European cities, a handful of artists -- Vasily Kandinsky, Frantisek Kupka, Francis Picabia, and Robert Delaunay -- presented the first abstract pictures to the public. Inventing Abstraction, 1910-25 celebrates the centennial of this bold new type of artwork, tracing the development of abstraction as it moved through a network of modern artists, from Marsden Hartley and Marcel Duchamp to Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, sweeping across nations and across media. The exhibition brings together many of the most influential works in abstraction's early history and covers a wide range of artistic production, including paintings, drawings, books, sculptures, films, photographs, sound poems, atonal music, and non-narrative dance, to draw a cross-media portrait of these watershed years.

Kandinsky 1911-1913 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through April 17, 2013 - New York

Perhaps more than any other 20th-century painter, Vasily Kandinsky (b. 1866, Moscow; d. 1944, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) has been closely linked to the history of the Guggenheim Museum. Hilla Rebay--artist, art advisor, and the museum's first director--promoted nonobjective painting above all other forms of abstraction. She was particularly inspired by the work and writing of Kandinsky, a pioneer of abstraction, who believed that the task of the painter was to convey his own inner world, rather than imitate the natural world. The museum's holdings have grown to include more than 150 works by Kandinsky, and focused exhibitions of his works are presented in the Kandinsky Gallery on Annex Level 3. The current installation, Kandinsky 1911-1913, highlights paintings completed at the moment the artist made great strides toward complete abstraction and published his aesthetic treatise, On the Spiritual in Art (1911, though dated 1912). Also featured are paintings by Robert Delaunay and Franz Marc that were exhibited alongside the work of Kandinsky and others in the landmark 1912 Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) exhibition held at the Moderne Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser in Munich.

The Shaping of New Visions: Photography, Film, Photobook - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 21, 2013 - Midtown

This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography's role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements -- with a special emphasis on the medium's relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and Post-Conceptual art -- and in the development of contemporary artistic practices. The shaping of what came to be known as "New Vision" photography bore the obvious influence of "lens-based" and "time-based" works. El Lissitzky best summarized its ethos: "The new world will not need little pictures," he wrote in The Conquest of Art (1922). "If it needs a mirror, it has the photograph and the cinema." Bringing together over 250 works from MoMA's collection, the exhibition features major projects by Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Germaine Krull, Gerhard Ruhm, Helen Levitt, Daido Moriyama, Robert Heinecken, Ed Ruscha, Martha Rosler, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip-Lorca DiCorcia, and Walid Raad, among others. Photographic history is presented as a multivalent history of distinct "new visions," rooted in unconventional and innovative exercises that range from photograms and photomontages to experimental films and photobooks.

Edvard Munch: The Scream - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 29, 2013 - New York

Edvard Munch's iconic The Scream (1895), among the most celebrated and recognized images in art history, will be on view at The Museum of Modern Art for a period of six months. Of the four versions of The Scream made by Munch between 1893 and 1910, this pastel-on-board from 1895 is the only one remaining in private hands; the three other versions are in the collections of museums in Norway. The Scream is being lent by a private collector.

Space Shuttle Enterprise: A Pioneer - Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum
Through April 30, 2013 - New York

"Space Shuttle Enterprise: A Pioneer" -- a new exhibition that explores the history of Enterprise and its critical role in the development of the space shuttle -- will open to the public on Thursday, January 17 at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, located at Pier 86 (46th Street and 12th Avenue) in Manhattan. "Space Shuttle Enterprise: A Pioneer" introduces Enterprise with compelling artifacts of the era -- such as space shuttle cockpit instruments, a flight helmet and model orbiters -- as well as archival images and video clips to illustrate the history and significance of the prototype orbiter. The exhibition celebrates the pilots and engineers who contributed to the Enterprise story in addition to the technological innovations that helped to make it an icon of the space program. This exhibition will also include photographs crowd sourced from the public who have documented Enterprise's journey from its origins in the 1970s to its expedition to the Intrepid Museum last spring. The exhibition will be open to the public through Spring 2013. In April 2012, the space shuttle Enterprise arrived in New York City and in July 2012, Enterprise joined the collection of the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in a temporary, climate-controlled Space Shuttle Pavilion on the Flight Deck. However in late October, Hurricane Sandy damaged the pavilion, and as a result, Enterprise itself is not currently on public display. The exhibition is free with the price of admission to the museum. The museum is currently offering a Gift of Intrepid "buy one, get one free" promotion through February 15, 2013. The special social media offer is available to those who are Facebook fans of the Museum or those who follow the museum on Twitter. Visitors must print and bring with them the special coupon posted. For more information, visit www.intrepidmuseum.org.

Treasures from the Vault - Morgan Library & Museum
Through May 05, 2013 - New York

From Mozart to Machiavelli, there is always something fascinating to explore in the Morgan's historic McKim building. From January 15 to May 5, thirty works from the Morgan's exceptional collections of medieval manuscripts, printed books and bindings, private letters and correspondence, and original music will be on view. Highlights include such treasures as a letter from J. R. R. Tolkien containing his commentary on the creation and critical reception of The Hobbit; a magnificent twelfth-century illuminated manuscript depicting the life, passion, and miracles of St. Edmund; Percy Bysshe Shelley's On Life manuscript; and Beethoven's Tenth Violin Sonata in G Major. The Morgan's important holdings of Americana are represented by a letter from Alexander Hamilton to Martha Washington upon the death of her husband, and a volume of Edward Curtis's monumental The North American Indian, a photographic project funded in part by Pierpont Morgan.

The Dream Continues: Photographs of Martin Luther King Murals by Vergara - New-York Historical Society
Through May 05, 2013 - New York

Since the 1970s Camilo Vergara has been traveling across the United States photographing and thus documenting hand-painted murals of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as they appeared on the walls of establishments such as car repair shops, barbershops, and fast food restaurants in city streets and alley ways. The folk art portraits have expressed how the inner-city residents saw the slain civil rights leader--at times a statesman, a hero, a visionary, or a martyr. Vergara also discovered that these images were often based on iconic photographs of Dr. King but that, depending upon the neighborhood where they were created, the portraits could take on the likeness of Latinos, Native Americans, or Asians.

Projects 99: Meiro Koizumi - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through May 06, 2013 - New York

Working in video and performance, Meiro Koizumi (Japanese, b. 1976) has built a compelling body of work that deals with power dynamics on scales from the familial to the national, and examines questions of political and psychological control. Implicating himself, his performers, and the viewer through choreographed emotional manipulations, Koizumi creates works that straddle the uncomfortable and indefinable line between cruelty and comedy. His first solo museum presentation in the United States, Projects 99 includes a selection of earlier projects, as well as Defect in Vision (2011), Meiro's most ambitious and accomplished project to date. Probing the idea of blindness -- both philosophical and physical -- the piece is projected on two sides of a single screen, preventing the viewer from taking in both views at once. The action follows two performers who repeatedly enact a domestic scene set during World War II. While staged in the historical past, the scene's portent of impending catastrophe has taken on a new relevance following the Fukushima nuclear disaster, in a work that is incisive, thought-provoking, and visually lush.

WWII & NYC - New-York Historical Society
Through May 27, 2013 - Upper West Side

When World War II broke out, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the war and strongly held opinions. WWII & NYC will explore the impact of the war on the metropolis, which played a critical role in the national war effort, and how the city was forever changed.

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter! - American Museum of Natural History
Through May 28, 2013 - New York

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter!, a perennial favorite visited by millions of children and adults, returns to the American Museum of Natural History. This popular winter attraction invites visitors to mingle with up to 500 iridescent butterflies fluttering among blooming tropical flowers and lush green vegetation inside a free-standing, balmy, 1,200-square-foot enclosure.

Bronx Lab - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through June 02, 2013 - Bronx

A forum and test site for new ideas, BRONX LAB engages audiences in topics relevant to our surrounding communities. Through different social media platforms as well as hands-on activities, viewers will be asked to interact with the exhibition's main themes and exercise their critical views. Drawing primarily from the Museum's permanent collection, BRONX LAB's first exhibition will look at the explosion of graffiti art that happened in the South Bronx in the late 1970s, featuring artworks by Rigoberto Torres, Tim Rollins and KOS, Glendalys Medina, Keith Haring and William Borroughs, Valeri Larko, Lady K. Fever, among others.

Aesthetic Ambitions: Edward Lycett and Brooklyn's Faience Manufacturing Company - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 16, 2013 - Brooklyn

This exhibition highlights the nearly fifty-year career of ceramicist Edward Lycett (American, 1833-1910), creative director of the Faience Manufacturing Company from 1884 to 1890. The range of works illustrates Lycett's talent and adaptability to stylistic changes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as his vision for Faience, a company based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, that earned acclaim for producing ornamental wares that introduced a new standard of excellence in American ceramics. These bold and eclectic pieces synthesized Japanese, Chinese, and Islamic influences characteristic of the Aesthetic movement and were sold in the United States' foremost art ware emporiums, including Tiffany & Company. Among the ceramics on view are 39 Faience pieces, including a number of large-scale vases. Also on view are Lycett's formula books, family photographs, and other ephemera; rare examples of ceramic works by his three sons; and other Brooklyn-made ceramics from the Museum's collection.

Picturing Science: Museum Scientists and Imaging Technologies - American Museum of Natural History
Through June 24, 2013 - New York

More than 20 sets of large-format images showcase the wide range of research being conducted at the Museum as well as how various optical tools are used in scientific studies.

The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed Instruments - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

The Sau-Wing Lam collection of violin-family instruments is one of the most important collections of bowed Italian stringed instruments ever assembled by a private individual. Sau-Wing Lam (1923-1988) was born in Shanghai, China, where he graduated with a degree in economics from the prestigious Saint John's University. In 1948 he moved to New York City and eventually became the president of the Dah Chong Hong Trading Corporation, Inc., an import-export business that founded some of the most successful automobile dealerships in the country. An amateur violinist and violist, Lam bought his first important violin in the 1960s and assembled his impressive collection of violins and bows over the next twenty-five years. His holdings eventually included such significant instruments as the "Baltic" violin by Giuseppe Guarneri "del Gesu," the "Bavarian" and "Scotland University" violins by Antonio Stradivari, the "ex Collin" violin by Nicolo Amati, an extremely early viola by Andrea Amati, and Lam's favorite violin, an instrument by Giuseppe Guarneri, one of his earliest acquisitions. Sau-Wing Lam enjoyed sharing his collection and regularly opened his home to scholars, dealers, and musicians. The family hosted impromptu chamber concerts and passionate discussions about music that would last well into the early morning hours. On the twenty-fifth anniversary of Mr. Lam's death, the collection is being exhibited here for the first time in the United States.

Flight of the Butterflies - American Museum of Natural History
Through July 07, 2013 - NY

Flight of the Butterflies, a breathtaking new giant-screen adventure takes viewers on the epic 3,000-mile journey traveled every fall by half a billion monarch butterflies. The film is the awe-inspiring story of two unlikely heroes that share a common strength. Based on true events, it follows the perilous journey of the iconic monarch butterfly in one of the most incredible migrations on Earth and the determined scientist, Dr. Fred Urquhart, who spent 40 years trying to discover the mysteries surrounding their journey and secret winter hideaway. Presented in the LeFrak Imax Theater.

Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 11, 2013 - New York

Food celebrates cultures and cooking, historic meals and markets, and moments in our lives that we mark with food -- as well as the ingredients that we have discovered and shaped over the course of thousands of years. As this exhibition takes visitors on a journey of growing, transporting, cooking, tasting, and celebrating, it also examines contemporary issues of environmental and human health, food security, feeding the world's growing population, and how we will eat in the future. Gallery 3, third floor

Journey to the Stars - American Museum of Natural History
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

A spectacular new Space Show, Journey to the Stars, narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Whoopi Goldberg, in the Hayden Planetarium at the Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space. Journey to the Stars is an engrossing, immersive theater experience created by the Museum's astrophysicists, scientific visualization, and media production experts with the cooperation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and more than 40 leading scientists from the United States and abroad.

WINGED TAPESTRIES: MOTHS AT LARGE - American Museum of Natural History
Through September 29, 2013 -

Winged Tapestries: Moths at Large, an exhibition of 34 striking images featuring dramatic images of moths, opens at AMNH. On view in the IMAX Corridor on the first floor, the exhibition displays the arresting beauty and surprising diversity of moths from Ottawa-based photographer Jim des Rivières. "Moths are beautiful, and in many respects prettier than butterflies," says exhibition curator David Grimaldi, curator, Division of Invertebrate Zoology. "In this show, we have macro or relatively large moths. They're gorgeous." Primitive moths appeared about 195 million years ago, whereas the oldest butterfly fossil is about 55 million years old. And today, moths outnumber butterflies 15 to 1, with approximately 150,000 described species of moths worldwide, compared to 10,000 butterfly species.

Winged Tapestries: Moths at Large - American Museum of Natural History
Through September 29, 2013 - New York

Witness the arresting beauty and surprising diversity of moths in a presentation of more than 30 large-format prints by Canadian photographer Jim des Rivieres. Des Rivieres creates these larger-than-life images by scanning each moth at high resolution to reveal unexpected colors and intricate patterns.

American Legends: From Calder to O'Keeffe - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through December 22, 2013 - New York

American Legends: From Calder to O'Keeffe showcases the Whitney's deep holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century by the eighteen leading artists: Oscar Bluemner, Charles Burchfield, Paul Cadmus, Alexander Calder, Joseph Cornell, Ralston Crawford, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Gaston Lachaise, Jacob Lawrence, John Marin, Reginald Marsh, Elie Nadelman, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Joseph Stella. Organized as concentrated one- and two-artist presentations, each gallery will serve as an interdisciplinary, small-scale retrospective. Rotations of art and of artists will be made during the exhibition's yearlong duration.

Gateway to Himalayan Art - The Rubin Museum
Through January 06, 2014 - New York

Marking the first in a series of yearly rotations, nearly twenty works of art add new dimensions and context to Gateway to Himalayan Art. Visitors will notice a greater emphasis on Hindu works, with beautiful examples from India and Nepal ranging from 12th to 19th centuries, as well as intricately-detailed thangka paintings, manuscript pages, and textiles. In every iteration, Gateway acquaints new and long-time friends of the museum with the principal concepts of Himalayan art, including important deities and symbols, the materials and techniques used in creating works of art, and the purposes and functions of these works in their sacred and secular contexts. And don't forget to pick up your Gateway Looking Guide to help you identify important figures and symbols throughout the museum. It's yours to keep.

 


Archives:

Related Articles
Most Popular Articles on CGNY
   ACTIVITY PLANNER
Arrival:
Click Here to open the calendar
Departure:
Click Here to open the calendar
Category:
 

JUMP TO CITYGUIDE LISTINGS

 · Theater
 · Culture/Museums
 · Sightseeing
 · Galleries

 · Nightlife
 · Family Fun
 · Places to Eat
 · Shopping in NYC

 · Activity Planner
 · Discounts
 · Hotels
 · Maps


 Advertising |  Add a Calendar Event |  Bookmarks |  Company News |  Contact Us | Jobs @ City Guide
 Suggest a Listing

 For More Content Visit: Concierge Choice Awards | Promenade Magazine | NY Metro Parents Magazine
Bar Bat Mitzvah Book | NYC Activities | NYC Dining | NYC Discounts | NYC Events
NYC Museums | NYC Shopping | NYC Theater

Contact us. All Materials Copyright 2014 Davler Media Group, LLC
View Privacy Policy | Terms of Service

HBO Shop Coupon - Buy More, Save More
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum Coupon - 20% Off General Admission, Space Shuttle & Guided Tours
NBA Store - $10 Gift Card With Spalding Basketball Purchase
Dave & Buster's Coupon - Times Square - New York City - Free $20 Game Play
Click Here for More Discounts...
· 2014 New York Comedy Festival
· Far East Eats: Our Favorite NYC Asian Restaurants
· This Week in NYC
· Being Berry Gordy: Josh Tower Talks Motown the Musical
· Little Italy's Annual Feast of San Gennaro Begins September 11
· Making Pottery Art: The Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection of French Ceramics (ca. 1880-1910) - Metropolitan Museum of Art Through August 18, 2014
· Nine Museums to Visit in New York City
· A History of New York City Skyscrapers
· Mind's Eye-Frank LLoyd Wright Building: Inside and Out - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on August 13, 2014
· Bon Voyage! A Guide to Getting Around NYC by Water
Click Here for More News...
Click below to contact our NYC Experts for suggestions on group activities & more:
Dining
Sightseeing
Nightlife
Theater 
Shopping
Transportation
buy tickets | find savings | set your itinerary
Chelsea
Chinatown
East Village
Financial District
Greenwich Village
Harlem
Little Italy
Lower East Side
Midtown East
Midtown West
Soho
Theater District
Times Square
Tribeca
Upper East Side
Upper West Side

LOGIN
 email:

password:


save
 Forgot Password?