Things to do this week in NYC Jun 29-Jul 6: Museums (City Guide Magazine)

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Things to do this week in NYC Jun 29-Jul 6: Museums

June 29, 2013 - by CG Directory Editor

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed Instruments - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

The Sau-Wing Lam collection of violin-family instruments is one of the most important collections of bowed Italian stringed instruments ever assembled by a private individual. Sau-Wing Lam (1923-1988) was born in Shanghai, China, where he graduated with a degree in economics from the prestigious Saint John's University. In 1948 he moved to New York City and eventually became the president of the Dah Chong Hong Trading Corporation, Inc., an import-export business that founded some of the most successful automobile dealerships in the country. An amateur violinist and violist, Lam bought his first important violin in the 1960s and assembled his impressive collection of violins and bows over the next twenty-five years. His holdings eventually included such significant instruments as the "Baltic" violin by Giuseppe Guarneri "del Gesu," the "Bavarian" and "Scotland University" violins by Antonio Stradivari, the "ex Collin" violin by Nicolo Amati, an extremely early viola by Andrea Amati, and Lam's favorite violin, an instrument by Giuseppe Guarneri, one of his earliest acquisitions. Sau-Wing Lam enjoyed sharing his collection and regularly opened his home to scholars, dealers, and musicians. The family hosted impromptu chamber concerts and passionate discussions about music that would last well into the early morning hours. On the twenty-fifth anniversary of Mr. Lam's death, the collection is being exhibited here for the first time in the United States.

David Hartt - Stray Light - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

Color photographs, sculptures and a video installation by Chicago-based conceptual photographer David Hartt (b. 1967) reflecting on the iconic headquarters of the Johnson Publishing Company in downtown Chicago.

Fred Wilson - Local Color - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

For the first time since its exhibition in 1993, the Studio Museum will be presenting conceptual artist Fred Wilson (b. 1954)'s installation Local Color, originally created for the Studio Museum exhibition Artists Respond: The "New World" Question.

Assembly Required - Selections from the Permanent Collection - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

Photographs, drawings, sculptures and paintings from the Studio Museum's permanent collection that explore the ways in which certain works are dependent on site, and the viewer's conceptual and perceptual experience of that locale through the artist's intervention.

Aye A. Aton: Space-Time Continuum - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

This collection of over 200 slides documents the artist and avant-garde jazz musician's murals through image and sound, providing an intimate glimpse into the domestic lives of an African-American community on the cusp of cultural transformation. This project marks Aton's first solo museum presentation.

Brothers and Sisters - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

This show takes as a starting point works on paper by twentieth-century painter Beauford Delaney (1901-1975). This cross-generational exhibition examines the relationship between Delaney's paintings and prints made between 1958 and 1969 in Paris and works in the Studio Museum's permanent collection by African-American artists continuing and expanding the project of painterly abstraction.

Harlem Postcards - Spring 2013 - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

Harlem Postcards is an ongoing project that invites contemporary artists of diverse backgrounds to reflect on Harlem as a site of cultural activity, political vitality, visual stimuli, artistic contemplation and creative production. Representing intimate and dynamic perspectives of Harlem, the images reflect the idiosyncratic visions of contemporary artists from a wide range of backgrounds and locations. Each photograph has been reproduced as a limited edition postcard available free to visitors.

Mendi + Keith Obadike: American Cypher - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

The Studio Museum presents a site-specific iteration of a suite of projects that respond to American stories about race and DNA by the intermedia artists Mendi and Keith Obadike (both b. 1973).

Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family 1967 - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family 1967 honors the legacy and the work of late iconic artist and photojournalist Gordon Parks, who would have turned 100 on November 30, 2012. The exhibition, organized by Director and Chief Curator Thelma Golden and Assistant Curator Lauren Haynes, will feature approximately thirty black and white photographs of the Fontenelle family, whose lives Parks documented as part of a 1968 Life magazine photo essay.

MoMA Studio: Exchange Cafe - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through June 30, 2013 - New York

Organized in collaboration with Brooklyn-based artist Caroline Woolard as part of the Department of Education's Artists Experiment initiative, MoMA Studio: Exchange Cafe is a social space in the mezzanine of MoMA's Education and Research building that is dedicated to exchange-based practices. Taking the form of a cafe, the Studio encourages visitors to question notions of reciprocity, value, and property through shared experiences. Tea, milk, and honey -- products that directly engage the political economy -- are available by exchange. Instead of paying with legal tender, Exchange Cafe patrons are invited to make a resource-based currency. Exchange Cafe features an interactive participatory archive, a matrix of exchange projects, and a library of books and ephemera.

City Sundays West Side Story - New-York Historical Society
June 30, 2013 - New York

Too hot outside? Join us for this family classic while you kick back and enjoy some popcorn. Get a glimpse into the rough-and-tumble world of 1950s New York City through the epic love story of Tony and Maria. The lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and score by Leonard Bernstein bring the streets of New York alive – many of the scenes were filmed on location near the current location of Lincoln Center. After the film, discover photographs of the five boroughs from the 19th and 20th centuries in the DiMenna Children's History Museum.

Math Encounters: From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes - National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath)
July 03, 2013 - New York

What does the ancient Japanese art of paper folding have to do with airbags and space telescopes? How do mathematical techniques facilitate origami designs of mind-blowing complexity and realism? Unfold a new appreciation of origami as Robert Lang, one of the foremost origami artists in the world and a pioneer in computational origami, shows how a theory originally developed for its own sake has led to some surprising practical applications as well as a whole new genre of art. Robert will be introduced by Vanessa Gould, the filmmaker behind the documentary "Between the Folds.

History of Ice Cream - New-York Historical Society
July 04, 2013 - New York

I scream, you scream! Come experience popular flavors of the past and help us crank up batches of 18th and 19th century ice cream recipes. Families will experience both familiar flavors like mint, and unfamiliar flavors like orange flower water; use a historic ice cream crank, and then taste test the results!

Independence Day Scavenger Hunt - New-York Historical Society
July 04, 2013 - New York

All ages. Free with Museum admission. Hunt high and low in the New-York Historical Society on our scavenger hunt celebrating our nation's independence. Families will search for the horse tail from King George's statue, George Washington's cot, and other 4th of July treasures. When finished, enter our raffle for Liberty the Dog!

Target First Saturday - Brooklyn Museum
July 06, 2013 - Brooklyn

On July 6, Target First Saturday celebrates American innovation and the diversity that defines American culture. Target First Saturday events attract thousands of visitors to free art and entertainment programs each month.

Flight of the Butterflies - American Museum of Natural History
Through July 07, 2013 - NY

Flight of the Butterflies, a breathtaking new giant-screen adventure takes viewers on the epic 3,000-mile journey traveled every fall by half a billion monarch butterflies. The film is the awe-inspiring story of two unlikely heroes that share a common strength. Based on true events, it follows the perilous journey of the iconic monarch butterfly in one of the most incredible migrations on Earth and the determined scientist, Dr. Fred Urquhart, who spent 40 years trying to discover the mysteries surrounding their journey and secret winter hideaway. Presented in the LeFrak Imax Theater.

Museum as Hub: Center for Historical Reenactments: After-after Tears - New Museum
Through July 07, 2013 - New York

CHR was an artist collective and curatorial platform in Johannesburg (2010-12) that explored social and political memory within postapartheid South Africa. The exhibition will present a site-specific response to New York, developed through their Museum as Hub residency.

Cambodian Rattan - The Sculptures of Sopheap Pich - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 07, 2013 - New York

This exhibition presents ten works by the contemporary Cambodian artist Sopheap Pich (born 1971), who lives and works in Phnom Penh. Pich works principally in rattan and bamboo, constructing organic open-weave forms that are solid and ethereal, representational and abstract. Much of his work is inspired by elements of the human anatomy or plant life. His constructions combine his training as a painter with the spatial conceptualization of a sculptor, creating three-dimensional objects that are largely defined by their graphic character. Pich's art consciously embodies his memories of culture and place. The exhibition will be installed in three spaces in the Asian galleries, including an integration into historical displays, and is part of the Museum's contribution to the New York-wide Season of Cambodia.

Paul Thek and His Circle: Gay in the 1950s - Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
Through July 07, 2013 - New York

Raw/Cooked: Michael Ballou - Brooklyn Museum
Through July 07, 2013 - Brooklyn

Ballou is the eighth artist in the continuing Raw/Cooked series, presented with support from Bloomberg and highlighting the work of under-the-radar Brooklyn artists. The Museum offers each of the participating artists a variety of unconventional spaces in which they may make art interventions, creating projects that draw inspiration from the architecture of the building and/or works from the Museum's collection.

'A Sport for Every Girl': Women and Sports in the Collection of Jefferson R. Burdick - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 07, 2013 - New York

Beginning in the late 1870s, tobacco producers used inventive imagery of actresses, athletes, politicians, animals, flags, and world capitals -- to name only a few of the hundreds of categories -- to advertise their brands.

Adhocracy - New Museum
Through July 07, 2013 - New York

The exhibition explores a new direction in contemporary design through twenty-five projects -- presented through artifacts, objects, and films. In the place of standardized, industrialized perfection, the exhibition embraces imperfection as evidence of an emerging force of identity, individuality, and nonlinearity in design.

Living Shrines of Uyghur China - Rubin Museum of Art
Through July 08, 2013 - New York

Featuring photographs of sacred landscapes in northwestern China by New York-based artist Lisa Ross. In and around the Taklamakan Desert, Ross photographs Muslim shrines, or mazars, often adorned with recycled flags and fabrics. Ross's remarkable images are largely without the presence of the human figure, allowing the viewer to inhabit a space that is unmediated and complex.

Velazquez's Portrait of Francesco I d'Este - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 14, 2013 - New York

Among the most distinctive portraits by Diego Velazquez is one he painted of Francesco I d'Este (1610-58), the Duke of Modena, during the duke's visit to Madrid in 1638 to secure the support of Philip IV. The duke is shown in armor, wearing a red sash, his head turned toward the viewer. It is a work that conveys a quality of arrogance and sensuality, and is a high watermark in the history of baroque portraiture, while also illustrating the importance of Velazquez's portraits to Spanish diplomacy. In 1843 the painting was acquired by the Galleria Estense -- one of the most prestigious of Italy's regional museums -- in Modena, Italy, and it has never before been lent to an institution in the United States. This special, three-month loan coincides with the re-installation of the Metropolitan's collection of Old Master paintings. It not only makes accessible to an American public one of the least known of Velazquez's works, but also calls attention to the severe damage suffered throughout the Italian region of Emilia Romagna after a devastating earthquake in May 2012. The Galleria Estense has been temporarily closed due to the damage it sustained.

The Woolworth Building @ 100 - Skyscraper Museum
Through July 14, 2013 - New York

A masterpiece of early 20th-century art and technology, the Woolworth Building celebrates its centennial year in the process of conversion, with office space remaining below and luxury residences planned for the upper tower. Still radiant on the lower Manhattan skyline, the landmark heralds both the past and future of New York.

My Life Ruined by Sex: The Works of William Kent - Museum of Sex
Through July 14, 2013 - New York

This exhibition explores William Kent's (1919-2012) calamitous life through his art, highlighting his skill and creativity as well as the paradoxes that drove him, bringing his erotically charged work back to New York for the first time in nearly 50 years. From rising art star to recluse, self-taught printmaker and sculptor William Kent in many respects embodied the title of his semi-autobiographical 1964 print, "My Life Ruined By Sex". While Kent's first foray into the formal art world in New York in 1962 was met with positive reviews, with the New York Times declaring him a "definite discovery" in 1963 and noting that Kent was an artist "with one eye on old carvings of the cigar store Indian type and the other on Pop art at its most saucy," these positive reviews could not protect him from the censorship of the time and the detrimental impact his political critique would have upon his career. His 1965 exhibition of sexual-political prints at the Castellane Gallery in new York City entitled "Sex and Violence, Or Erotic and Patriotic Prints!" turned out to be the last straw and following its opening, and Kent was dismissed from his post at the John Slade Ely House, in part for creating "sick" works in its premise. Kent never fully recovered from the aftermath of this exhibition, losing his footing once and for all within the formal New York City-centric art scene he revered. He took solitary refuge in his barn in Durham, Connecticut, continuing to make prints regularly until 1977 when he turned his attention to wood sculpture, focusing on large scale pieces of everyday objects. Though far removed from the New York City art scene he so coveted after 1965, his creative output over the course of six decades never ceased. Kent carried out most of his life as a solitary, indigent, and overlooked master. This exhibition seeks to rectify this by bringing attention to his prints, slates, sculpture and personal ephemera, placing a life and a life's work in context.

2013 Doodle 4 Google Showcase - American Museum of Natural History
Through July 14, 2013 - New York

The American Museum of Natural History and Google have teamed up to present and showcase this year's 2013 Doodle 4 Google winners. The annual Doodle 4 Google competition invites students (grades K-12) across the country to submit their designs of the Google logo based off this year's theme "My Best Day Ever..."

Please Come to the Show, Part I (1960-1980) - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through July 15, 2013 - Midtown

Since its beginnings, the MoMA Library has housed several collections of artists' files and subject files, which contain assorted printed ephemera like announcement cards, press clippings, posters, and flyers. These materials illustrate an elaborate range of artistic activities and can contain unique elements from an artist's practice. This two-part exhibition gathers a sample of innovative printed invitations, small posters, and flyers from the early 1960s to the present. The selection traces ways in which artists, designers, and galleries have used invitation cards and other printed announcements as a part of the staging of conceptual works, installations, performances, and other time-based events and screenings. This diverse grouping of ephemera explores the various, surprising ways that we have been invited to experience art.

Munch | Warhol and the Multiple Image - Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America
Through July 27, 2013 - New York

An exhibition that brings together two of the 20th century's most prolific and inventive printmakers - Norwegian Edvard Munch and American Andy Warhol. Co-curated by Dr. Patricia G. Berman and Pari Stave and organized in honor of the 150th anniversary of Munch's birth, the exhibition closely examines four graphic images produced by Munch at the turn of the century - The Scream, Madonna, The Brooch. Eva Mudocci, Self-Portrait with Skeleton Arm - and later revisited by Andy Warhol in a little-known but extraordinary series of prints from 1984. Comprising over 30 original works from private and museum collections - some of which will be seen for the first time - the exhibition reveals remarkable affinities between the two artists: a preoccupation with themes of anxiety and alienation, ideal beauty, sex and mortality, and an ability to skillfully mine the iconic power of the image to craft their own mythic identities in self-portraits and in life.

John Singer Sargent Watercolors - Brooklyn Museum
Through July 28, 2013 - Brooklyn

This landmark exhibition unites for the first time the John Singer Sargent watercolors acquired by the Brooklyn Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the early twentieth century. The culmination of a yearlong collaborative study by both museums, John Singer Sargent Watercolors explores the watercolor practice that has traditionally been viewed as a tangential facet of Sargent's art making. The ninety-three pieces on display provide a once-in-a-generation opportunity to view a broad range of the artist's finest production in the medium. Brooklyn's thirty-eight watercolors, most of which have not been on view for decades, were largely purchased from Sargent's 1909 debut exhibition in New York. Their subjects include Venetian scenes (The Bridge of Sighs), Mediterranean sailing vessels, intimate portraits (A Tramp), and Bedouin subjects (Bedouins). Boston's watercolors, purchased in 1912, are more highly finished than the Brooklyn works. They feature subjects from his travels to the Italian Alps, the villa gardens near Lucca, and the marble quarries of Carrara, as well as portraits. The exhibition also presents nine oil paintings, including Brooklyn's An Out-of-Doors Study, Paul Helleu and His Wife (1889) and Boston's The Master and His Pupils (1914). New discoveries based on scientific study of Sargent's pigments, drawing techniques, and paper preparation are featured in a special section deconstructing his techniques. Select works throughout the exhibition are paired with videos that show a contemporary watercolor artist demonstrating some of Sargent's methods.

Birds in the Art of Japan - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 28, 2013 - New York

This exhibition presents approximately 150 works in various media from medieval times to the present. Highlights include a unique, early seventeenth-century pair of ink-painted screens showing a flock of 120 mynah birds in flight or strutting on the shore; and a set of four enormous paintings of birds of prey by the nineteenth-century master Kawanabe Kyōsai, each over nine feet high. Displays of paintings will be juxtaposed with examples of modern and contemporary textiles, ceramics, lacquerware, and bamboo art. Drawn mostly from the Museum's own collection, it will also feature some fifteen works on loan from private collections.

At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 28, 2013 - New York

The Met presents the work of this idiosyncratic artist, whose influences are drawn from disparate if surprisingly complementary sources -- from Walker Evans and Henri Cartier-Bresson in photography to Bach and late Baroque music. Many of Eggleston's most recognized photographs are lush studies of the social and physical landscape found in the Mississippi delta region that is his home. From this base, the artist explores the awesome and, at times, the raw visual poetics of the American vernacular.

A Trip from Here to There - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through July 30, 2013 - New York

Over the course of two years, from 2008 to 2010, the artist Mateo Lopez traveled through his native Colombia, from Bogota to Cali to Medellin. Crisscrossing vast expanses of territory via Vespa, Lopez made drawings, rendering the ordinary objects he encountered in precise detail. In a country occupied by government forces and paramilitary rebels, traveling itself -- and the diaristic drawing that served as documentation -- became an act of resistance. Using Lopez's Viaje sin movimiento -- an installation of his drawings from this journey -- as a starting point, A Trip from Here to There explores practices and works generated by walking and wandering. As members of exploratory expeditions and surveys, painters and draftsmen have long played key roles in the plotting and investigation of place. However, in the second half of the 20th century, the journey itself became both medium and subject for many artists. In some works, a walk or sojourn is precisely documented via maps and charts, dates and times, while in others, wandering's inherent detours and deviations are exploited, resulting in collages of impressions or graphs of explored terrain. For some artists, drawing is both nomadic and solitary, while for others it is a way to engage with one's environment and its inhabitants. In addition to Lopez, featured artists include Marcel Broodthaers, Juan Downey, Hamish Fulton, Brion Gysin, Mona Hatoum, Richard Long, Jorge Macchi, and Robert Morris. Genzken's work has been part of the artistic discourse since she began exhibiting in the mid-1970s, but over the last decade a new generation has been inspired by her radical inventiveness. The past 10 years have been particularly productive for Genzken, who, with a new language of found objects and collage, has created several bodies of work that have redefined assemblage for a new era. These groups of sculptures range from smaller, diorama-like works to room-filling installations.

Barings in America - An Interactive Investment Experience - Museum of American Finance
Through July 31, 2013 - New York

Barings Bank provided financial backing in the US from the nation's beginning through the industrial revolution. This exhibition explores five of the firm's US investments, some good and some bad. Barings chose to invest in the fledgling government and its industry. Would you have done the same?

Making the Invisible Visible - Conservation and Islamic Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

Conservators and conservation scientists made many exciting and interesting discoveries as they and the curators re-examined the Museum's collection of Islamic art prior to the reopening of the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia in November 2011. This exhibition will trace their investigative journey with a range of works of art providing new perspectives for appreciating this extraordinary collection.

Patronage and Power: Selections from the Asia Society Museum Collection - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

This exhibition comprises select pieces from Asia Society's Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection. The show explores the role of patrons of wealth and rank as dominating figures in the production of artistic creations. Approximately fifty examples of sculptureand ceramic from South, Southeast, and East Asia. The selection includes religious art, both Buddhist and Hindu. In addition, ceremonial objects that served as a visual structure for the governing patterns of patrons both for this life and beyond will be on view. Decorative functional objects such as plates and vases, and prized collectables like porcelains, which testify to the legitimacy and supremacy of rulers and aristocrats, round out the exhibition.

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 04, 2013 - Brooklyn

The first solo exhibition in a New York museum by the globally renowned contemporary artist El Anatsui, this show will feature over 30 works in metal and wood that transform appropriated objects into site-specific sculptures. Anatsui converts found materials into a new type of media that lies between sculpture and painting, combining aesthetic traditions from his birth country, Ghana; his home in Nsukka, Nigeria; and the global history of abstraction. Included in the exhibition are twelve recent monumental wall and floor sculptures, widely considered to represent the apex of Anatsui's career. The metal wall works, created with bottle caps from a distillery in Nsukka, are pieced together to form colorful, textured hangings that take on radically new shapes with each installation. Anatsui is captivated by his materials' history of use, reflecting his own nomadic background. Gravity and Grace responds to a long history of innovations in abstract art and performance, building upon cross-cultural exchange among Africa, Europe, and the Americas and presenting works in a wholly new, African medium. Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui is organized by the Akron Art Museum and made possible by a major grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The Brooklyn presentation is organized by Kevin Dumouchelle, Associate Curator of the Arts of Africa and the Pacific Islands, Brooklyn Museum.

As it were ... So to speak - A Museum Collection in Dialogue with Barbara Bloom - The Jewish Museum
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

Artist Barbara Bloom has devoted her career to questioning the ways we perceive and value objects. With a light touch and subtle wit, she divines the meanings encoded in the things with which we surround ourselves. The Jewish Museum invited Bloom to create an installation drawn from its more than 26,000 works of ceremonial, decorative, and fine art. Her presentation sets a selection of over 270 pieces in unconventional contexts, and offers visitors new ways to view the Museum and its holdings. The exhibition she is creating materializes the idea of people in dialogue across time and space, inspired in part by Bloom's reflections on Talmudic discourse, which takes place over centuries. Integrating the former Warburg mansion's historic rooms into her concept, the artist envisions the space as both museum and home filled with imagined historical guests - Nefertiti, Emile Zola, George Gershwin and others - from diverse times engaged in discourse and argument. The subjects are wide-ranging and reflect ideas that have long interested the artist: inferring a whole from surviving remnants, navigating the intricacies of bestowing gifts, representing the unspeakable. Furniture-shaped display cases contain collection objects that the artist finds intriguing or appealing. For example, Torah pointers with their delicate hands and extended forefingers stand in for strings inside a piano; a cigar box owned by Sigmund Freud is displayed in a psychoanalyst's consultation space; and a Dreyfus Affair game board sits on a table with ancient Roman dice. Each tableau is accompanied by written passages suggesting conversations between people. These evocative juxtapositions of found texts, Bloom's writings, artworks, and cases, create unexpected connections and spark dialogue.

Six Things: Sagmeister & Walsh - The Jewish Museum
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

Artist Barbara Bloom has devoted her career to questioning the ways we perceive and value objects. With a light touch and subtle wit, she divines the meanings encoded in the things with which we surround ourselves. The Jewish Museum invited Bloom to create an installation drawn from its more than 26,000 works of ceremonial, decorative, and fine art. Her presentation sets a selection of over 270 pieces in unconventional contexts, and offers visitors new ways to view the Museum and its holdings. The exhibition she is creating materializes the idea of people in dialogue across time and space, inspired in part by Bloom's reflections on Talmudic discourse, which takes place over centuries. Integrating the former Warburg mansion's historic rooms into her concept, the artist envisions the space as both museum and home filled with imagined historical guests - Nefertiti, Emile Zola, George Gershwin and others - from diverse times engaged in discourse and argument. The subjects are wide-ranging and reflect ideas that have long interested the artist: inferring a whole from surviving remnants, navigating the intricacies of bestowing gifts, representing the unspeakable. Furniture-shaped display cases contain collection objects that the artist finds intriguing or appealing. For example, Torah pointers with their delicate hands and extended forefingers stand in for strings inside a piano; a cigar box owned by Sigmund Freud is displayed in a psychoanalyst's consultation space; and a Dreyfus Affair game board sits on a table with ancient Roman dice. Each tableau is accompanied by written passages suggesting conversations between people. These evocative juxtapositions of found texts, Bloom's writings, artworks, and cases, create unexpected connections and spark dialogue.

Objects from the Kharga Oasis - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

This selection of late Roman and Byzantine period objects from the Metropolitan Museum's excavations at the Kharga Oasis includes textiles, ceramics, and grave goods from an intact tomb.

HOMEwork: Selections from the Asia Society Museum Collection - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

As modern day lifestyles become increasingly fast-paced and transient the distinctions between personal and public space, work and leisure have become blurred. Many of the works by the eight artists featured in the exhibition address issues of labor while others examine the resiliency of communities in the face of environmental changes, whether man-made or through forces of nature. This exhibition features highlights from the Asia Society Museum's contemporary art collection.

The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia - Charting a New Empire - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 04, 2013 - New York

The Cyrus Cylinder is one of the most famous surviving icons from the ancient world. Excavated at Babylon in 1879, the Cylinder was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform on the orders of the Persian king Cyrus the Great after he captured Babylon in 539 B.C. It marks the establishment of Persian rule and records how Cyrus restored shrines and allowed deported peoples to return home. Although not mentioned, it is thought to be at this time that the Jews returned to Jerusalem to build the Second Temple, as recorded in the Bible. The Cylinder and sixteen related works, all on loan from the Department of the Middle East in the British Museum, reflect the innovations initiated by Persian rule in the ancient Near East (550-331 B.C.) and chart a new path for this empire, the largest the world had known.

Claes Oldenburg: The Street and The Store - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 05, 2013 - Midtown

In the early 1960s, Claes Oldenburg redefined the concept of sculpture. This exhibition offers the most comprehensive overview of Oldenburg's early career to date, including The Store, the artist's best-known body of work from this period. In December 1961, Oldenburg rented a small storefront on East Second Street in New York City and filled it with handmade, brightly painted sculptures that evoked the everyday commercial products sold in stores throughout the neighborhood. Oldenburg created several iterations of The Store in the years following, and for this exhibition a large selection of Store sculptures and drawings are brought together to demonstrate the breadth and complexity of Oldenburg's vision and the daring inventiveness of his execution. Oldenburg's rarely exhibited installation The Street is also on view. Predating The Store, this seminal work was inspired by the gritty environs of the Lower East Side in the late 1950s. A selection of Oldenburg's performances, which accompanied these early sculptural endeavors, is represented by films projected throughout the galleries. On view in The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium are the Mouse Museum and Ray Gun Wing. Created in the 1970s, these self-contained "museums" house careful arrangements of the artist's personal archives of American popular culture, along with various tests and experiments from his studio.

Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 11, 2013 - New York

Food celebrates cultures and cooking, historic meals and markets, and moments in our lives that we mark with food -- as well as the ingredients that we have discovered and shaped over the course of thousands of years. As this exhibition takes visitors on a journey of growing, transporting, cooking, tasting, and celebrating, it also examines contemporary issues of environmental and human health, food security, feeding the world's growing population, and how we will eat in the future. Gallery 3, third floor

LaToya Ruby Frazier: A Haunted Capital - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 11, 2013 - Brooklyn

LaToya Ruby Frazier: A Haunted Capital uses social documentary and portraiture to create a personal visual history of an industrial town's decline. Through approximately 40 photographic works of her family and their hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania, Frazier offers an intimate exploration of the effects of deindustrialization on the lives of individuals and communities. Home to one of America's first steel mills, Braddock now has a population below 2,500 and has been declared a "distressed municipality." Frazier began to explore Braddock's history in her series Notion of Family, four examples of which are on view in this exhibition. That project uses the bodies of the artist, her mother, and her grandmother to both reveal complex intergenerational relationships and to serve as a metaphor for their town's decay. Frazier's portrayal of this American landscape is in stark contrast to images from a recent corporate ad campaign set in Braddock, which she felt not only erased the troubled realities of her endangered town but also excluded the community to which her family belongs. Frazier, whose work is featured in the 2012 Whitney Biennial, is Associate Curator for the Mason Gross galleries and teaches photography at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Up Where We Belong: Native Musicians in Popular Culture - National Museum of the American Indian
Through August 11, 2013 - New York

This panel and object exhibition highlights Native people who have been active participants in contemporary music for nearly a century. Musicians like Russell "Big Chief" Moore (Gila River Indian Community), Rita Coolidge (Cherokee), Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree), and the group Redbone are a few of the Native performing artists who have had successful careers in popular music. Many have been involved in various forms of popular music -- from jazz and blues to folk, country, and rock. Up Where We Belong: Native Musicians in Popular Culture tells their stories and histories, and provides visitors the opportunity to hear samples by music greats and discover musicians with whom those exceptional musicians collaborated. Visitors will also learn about artists who inspired the musical greats as well as the contemporary artists they themselves influenced.

R. B. Kitaj: Personal Library - The Jewish Museum
Through August 11, 2013 - New York

This exhibition features 33 screenprints from a suite of 50, created by the internationally celebrated painter and graphic artist, R. B. Kitaj in 1969. The portfolio, In Our Time, was acquired by the Museum in 2010. For this series, Kitaj reproduced from his personal library the covers of books that had a profound meaning for him. The images offer insights into the artist's psyche and form a remarkable artistic statement.

Old Masters, Newly Acquired - Morgan Library & Museum
Through August 11, 2013 - New York

Old Masters, Newly Acquired explores the recent growth of the Morgan's collection of drawings made before 1900. The past three years have been an exceptionally robust period during which important gifts, bequests, and purchases have both augmented and transformed the museum's holdings. Visitors have a unique opportunity to view many of these new additions spanning the Renaissance through the end of the nineteenth century. The exhibition showcases more than a hundred drawings, including major gifts from such notable collectors as former Morgan Director Charles Ryskamp, Trustees Eugene V. Thaw and Brooke Astor, and long-standing supporter Joseph McCrindle. An important group of recent purchases, including those made on the Sunny Crawford von Bulow Fund, highlights drawings selected by curators in their effort to build the collection. Discussions by curators and conservators -- accessible through complimentary audio guides -- will illuminate the creation, history, and acquisition of works in the show.

Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 12, 2013 - New York

Bill Brandt is a founding figure in photography's modernist traditions, and this exhibition represents a major critical reevaluation of his heralded career. Brandt's distinctive vision -- his ability to present the mundane world as fresh and strange -- emerged in London in the 1930s, and drew from his time in the Paris studio of Man Ray. His visual explorations of the society, landscape, and literature of England are indispensable to any understanding of photographic history and, arguably, to our understanding of life in Britain during the middle of the 20th century. Brandt's activity during the Second World War, long distilled by Brandt and others to a handful of now-iconic pictures of moonlit London during the Blackout and improvised shelters during the Blitz, are presented here for the first time in the context of his assignments for the leading illustrated magazines of his day, establishing a key link between his pre- and postwar work. Brandt's crowning artistic achievement, developed primarily between 1945 and 1961, is a series of nudes that are both personal and universal, sensual and strange, collectively exemplifying the "sense of wonder" that is paramount in his photographs. Brandt's work is unpredictable not only in the range of his subjects but also in his printing style, which varied widely throughout his career. This exhibition is the first to emphasize the beauty of Brandt's finest prints, and to trace the arc of their evolution.

Flip Side - Rubin Museum of Art
Through August 12, 2013 - New York

The texts and images on the back of Tibetan art objects reveal clues to their meaning, function, and historical context. For the first time ever both sides of a select group of scroll paintings (thangkas), sculptures, and initiation cards will be explored in detail. Chosen for the beauty, exceptional content, and complexity of their backs, these works of art dating from the 13th to the 19th century illuminate the many uses of the other side in Tibetan culture.

PUNK: Chaos to Couture - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 14, 2013 - New York

An examination of punk's impact on high fashion from the movement's birth in the early 1970s through its continuing influence today. Featuring approximately one hundred designs for men and women, the exhibition will include original punk garments and recent, directional fashion to illustrate how haute couture and ready-to-wear borrow punk's visual symbols.

Plain or Fancy? Restraint and Exuberance in the Decorative Arts - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 18, 2013 - New York

Modernism was not the first movement to cast a shadow on ornament and adornment, though it was the most effective one. This exhibition contrasts austere works of art with ornate ones, encouraging viewers to examine their own responses and to consider them in the light of different stylistic imperatives of the past. Drawn from the Museum's collection of European sculpture and decorative arts, the exhibition follows the theme from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century.

Search for the Unicorn - An Exhibition in Honor of The Cloisters 75th Anniversary - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 18, 2013 - New York

Given by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., in time for the opening of The Cloisters in 1938, the Unicorn Tapestries are its best-known masterpieces; yet, seventy-five years later, their history and meaning remain elusive. They have been seen both as complicated metaphors for Christ and as emblems of matrimony, and they are beloved as quaint indications of medieval notions about the natural world. This exhibition of some forty works of art drawn from the collections of the Metropolitan, sister institutions, and private collections will invite audiences to see the Unicorn Tapestries anew, as the finest expression of a subject widely treated across cultures, and in both European art and science, from the Middle Ages, through the Renaissance.

Land Marks - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 18, 2013 - New York

This exhibition of nineteen works from the permanent collection surveys the ways in which artists have made marks upon the earth, or made images from humanity's marks upon it. In the late 1960s, with the emergence of Land Art, artists began making works that were inextricably bound to their site. These "Earthworks" artists worked on location and used the earth itself as canvas or sculptural material; they created outdoor gestures in often farflung corners of the world that were both anti-monumental and epic in sweep. Because their art evaded the traditional progression from cloistered studio to rarified gallery and museum, the artists were often dependent on photography and mass media to communicate its very existence.

Playing with Fire - 50 Years of Contemporary Glass - Museum of Arts & Design
Through August 25, 2013 - New York

MAD celebrates the 50th anniversary of the birth of the American Studio Glass movement with Playing with Fire: 50 Years of Contemporary Glass, which will feature more than 100 works of glass from the collection, as well as promised gifts, and additional contemporary works on loan. Ever since 1962, when a legendary workshop led by renowned glass artist Harvey Littleton demonstrated the potential of glassblowing as a medium available to individual artists, artists and designers have continually pushed the material in new directions and used the complex, fragile, and highly versatile nature of the material to create an astonishing diversity of works.

New Acquisition: The Saint John's Bible - Morgan Library & Museum
Through August 25, 2013 - New York

In 1998 Saint John's University commissioned calligrapher Donald Jackson to produce a fully illuminated luxury manuscript of the Bible. Jackson and his team of artists completed The Saint John's Bible in May 2011, ensuring that the exquisite art of illumination -- so richly represented in the Morgan's collections of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts -- lives on into the twenty-first century. To document Jackson's monumental achievement, the University has published several facsimiles of the manuscript, including the lavish seven-volume Apostles Edition, issued in only twelve copies. Dr. William F. Hueg and Mrs. Hella Mears Hueg have presented to the Morgan a set of the Apostles Edition, five volumes of which have appeared to date. The Morgan will celebrate this generous gift with the display of the Prophets volume, as well as one of Jackson's preliminary studies for the Gospel of John frontispiece, on loan from the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library.

Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced - Museum of the City of New York
Through August 31, 2013 - New York

Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced is the first major examination of the work of the designer The New York Times called in 1977 the "brightest star of American fashion." It looks at the period spanning the 1970s when Stephen Burrows's meteoric rise to fame made him not only the first African-American designer to gain international stature, but a celebrated fashion innovator whose work helped define the look of a generation. With vibrant colors, metallic fabrics, and slinky silhouettes that clung to the body, Burrows's danceable designs generated a vibrant look that was of a piece with the glamorous, liberated nightlife of the era. Through photographs, drawings, and original garments, the exhibition will trace Burrows's evolution from creating eclectic looks for his friends in the 1960s to his work with the chic 57th Street retailer Henri Bendel to the floor of Studio 54, as he dressed such 70s style icons as Cher, Liza Minnelli, and Diana Ross.

Hava Nagila: A Song for the People - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through August 31, 2013 - New York

An exhibit that uses engaging imagery, video, music, and imaginative design to tell the little-known history of the wordless melody from Ukraine that became the theme song for Jewish celebrations around the world.

Journey to the Stars - American Museum of Natural History
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

A spectacular new Space Show, Journey to the Stars, narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Whoopi Goldberg, in the Hayden Planetarium at the Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space. Journey to the Stars is an engrossing, immersive theater experience created by the Museum's astrophysicists, scientific visualization, and media production experts with the cooperation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and more than 40 leading scientists from the United States and abroad.

Swing Time: Reginald Marsh and Thirties New York - New-York Historical Society
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

With his calligraphic brushstrokes and densely cluttered, multi-figured compositions, Reginald Marsh recorded the vibrancy and energetic pulse of New York City. In paintings, prints, watercolors and photographs, he captured the animation and visual turbulence that made urban New York life an exhilarating spectacle. His work depicted the visual energy the city, its helter-skelter signs, newspaper and magazine headlines and the crowded conditions of its street life and recreational pastimes.

Llyn Foulkes - New Museum
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

This long-overdue retrospective marks the first New York museum exhibition of works by Llyn Foulkes and will feature over ninety works from the scope of his sixty-year career.

I, You, We - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

I, you, we: three very commonplace words. These pronouns -- with all their implied complexities of meaning -- provide an unexpected guide for assessing the works of art from the 1980s and early 1990s in the Museum's collection. What becomes apparent in this survey of paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, and photographs is how the personal, social, and collective issues and concerns of the artists of this time are still relevant several decades later.

David Hockney: The Jugglers - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

This exhibition marks the U.S. premiere of Hockney's first video installation: The Jugglers (2012). Filmed using eighteen fixed cameras, this multiscreen tableau shows a group of jugglers as they move in a procession across a grid of eighteen screens.

Robert Irwin: Scrim Veil - Black Rectangle - Natural Light (1977) - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through September 01, 2013 - New York

A large-scale installation that uniquely engages the Whitney's iconic Breuer building and the natural light that emanates from the large window in the fourth floor gallery space. Part of the Whitney's collection, the work was made specifically for the Museum's fourth floor. It has not been exhibited since its 1977 debut, a pivotal moment that would set the course for Irwin's subsequent artistic practice.

Highlights from the Collection - Noguchi Museum
Through September 01, 2013 - Queens

The Noguchi's summer installation of highlights from the collection is organized around four instances in which Noguchi returned to an earlier body of work to rethink, redevelop, reproduce or restore it.

African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

This exhibition highlights the specific African artifacts acquired by the New York avant-garde and its most influential patrons during the 1910s and 1920s. Reflecting on the dynamism of New York's art scene during the years that followed the 1913 Armory Show, the exhibition brings together African works from the collections of many key individuals of the period such as Alfred Stieglitz, Marius de Zayas, John Quinn, Louise and Walter Arensberg, Alain LeRoy Locke, and Eugene and Agnes Meyer.

Photography and the American Civil War - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

More than two hundred of the finest and most poignant photographs of the American Civil War have been brought together for this landmark exhibition. Through examples drawn from the Metropolitan's celebrated holdings of this material, complemented by important loans from public and private collections, the exhibition will examine the evolving role of the camera during the nation's bloodiest war. The "War between the States" was the great test of the young Republic's commitment to its founding precepts; it was also a watershed in photographic history. The camera recorded from beginning to end the heartbreaking narrative of the epic four-year war (1861-1865) in which 750,000 lives were lost. This traveling exhibition will explore, through photography, the full pathos of the brutal conflict that, after 150 years, still looms large in the American public's imagination.

The Civil War and American Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

This major loan exhibition will explore how American artists responded to the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the trajectory of the conflict: from the palpable unease on the eve of war to the heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to the growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly, to grappling with the issues surrounding emancipation, the need for reconciliation as the war ended, and the uncertainty about how to put the country back together in its wake. It will feature some of the finest works made by leading figure painters such as Winslow Homer and Eastman Johnson, landscape painters such as Sanford R. Gifford and Frederic E. Church, and photographers such as Mathew Brady and George Barnard. The exhibition at the Metropolitan coincides with the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863) and the New York City Draft Riots (July 13-16, 1863), violent disturbances that made New Yorkers more painfully aware than ever before of the war and its implications.

Subliming Vessel: The Drawings of Matthew Barney - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

This show is the first-ever museum exhibition devoted to Matthew Barney's drawings. It includes approximately 100 works, from his earliest drawings made in the late 1980s while Barney was an undergraduate at Yale to the more finished drawings created in conjunction with the Cremaster cycle and recent performances inspired by Norman Mailer's Ancient Evenings. In addition, the exhibition will feature Barney's storyboards for his films and videos, including sketches, magazine clippings, and postcards combined with related rare books, medieval manuscripts, and drawings from the Morgan collection selected by the artist himself.

Illuminating Faith: The Eucharist in Medieval Life and Art - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

Featuring nearly sixty-five exquisitely illuminated manuscripts from France, Italy, and the Netherlands in the Morgan's collections, this exhibition will illustrate the Eucharist's powerful and sometimes cult-like hold on medieval life and medieval imagination. The bread and wine of Communion were understood to be the transubstantiated body and blood of Christ and were central to the culture of the Middle Ages. The exhibition begins with the institution of the Eucharist by Jesus at the Last Supper and continues to the arresting phenomena of miraculously bleeding wafers.

Koloman Moser: Designing Modern Vienna 1897-1907 - Neue Galerie
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

This monographic exhibition is devoted to the Austrian artist, designer, and Wiener Werksattte co-founder Koloman Moser (1868-1918). Organized by Neue Galerie decorative arts curator Dr. Christian Witt-Dorring, this comprehensive show will survey the entirety of Moser's career. Included in the exhibition will be important interior design commissions, examples of graphic design, furniture, textiles, jewelry, metalwork, glass, and earthenware, many of which are illustrated by numerous preparatory drawings and prints.

Universe of Desire - Museum of Sex
Through September 02, 2013 - New York

Type. Swipe. Search. Upload. Download. Post. Stream. These are the new verbs of desire. Our most intimate thoughts, fantasies, and urges are now transmitted via electronic devices to rapt audiences all over the world. These transmissions—from sexts to webcam masturbation feeds—are anonymous yet personal, individual yet collective, everywhere and nowhere, and they are contributing to the largest sexual record to date. In short, desire has gone viral. But what does this mean? And what does it reveal about us? This exhibition explores these very questions through a lens of digital experience by examining what we are searching for, how we do it and what we leave behind on these electronic devices. In piecing this together, we begin to expose staggering truths about who we are and how we interact in this ever-changing world of modern sexuality.

Jeffrey Gibson: Said the Pigeon to the Squirrel - National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts
Through September 08, 2013 - New York

Jeffrey Gibson's work has drawn critical acclaim for its commentary on cultural hybridity and has established him as a leading artist of his generation. Gibson, who is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, explores notions of identity and modernism within a contemporary context.

Visualizing Time: An Artist's Eye with Andrew Raftery, NA - National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts
Through September 08, 2013 - New York

Showcasing a selection of narrative prints from the Academy's collection, National Academician Andrew Raftery's examination focuses on how printmakers structured the representation of time as they created narratives that were comprehensible to their original audiences and compelling today.

Visions of Land and Sea: William Trost Richards - National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts
Through September 08, 2013 - New York

This exhibition reveals the Academy's rich collection of work by the major landscape and marine specialist William Trost Richards. The majority of these oils, watercolors and graphite drawings have never before been on public view.

Ellsworth Kelly: The Chatham Series - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 08, 2013 - New York

In celebration of Ellsworth Kelly's 90th birthday in May 2013, The Museum of Modern Art presents an exhibition of the first series of paintings the artist made after leaving New York City for Spencertown, in upstate New York, in 1970. His studio in the nearby town of Chatham was an abandoned theater, and it was more spacious than any the artist had previously occupied. The 14 paintings in the Chatham series, all produced during the year following Kelly's arrival, rely on a single formal concept: each ell-shaped work is made of two joined canvases of pure monochrome color. The works vary in color and proportion from one to the next; careful attention was paid to the size of each panel and the color selected in order to achieve balance and contrast between the two. Kelly developed the concept of painting on joined panels while working in Paris in the early 1950s, and it is an approach he continues to explore in his current work. The series has not been exhibited in its entirety since it was presented at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, in 1972, just a year after the paintings were finished. Reuniting this critical series provides a welcome opportunity to investigate a key moment in Kelly's artistic development.

Living in Style - Five Centuries of Interior Design from the Collection of Drawings and Prints - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 08, 2013 - New York

This exhibition combines drawings, prints, and objects from all over Europe and the United States as they were collected by the Metropolitan Museum over a period of more than a hundred years. It highlights the ingenuity, beauty, and wit often found in designs for the decorative arts, and follows the dynamic development of shapes, ornaments, and materials alternately governed by issues of comfort, theory, and aesthetics.

Hand Signals: Digits, Fists, and Talons - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 08, 2013 - New York

Hands -- a part of the human body through which we communicate, sense, measure, and interact with the material world -- are explored in this selection of 20th-century posters and graphic ephemera drawn from the Museum's collection. Individual identities are mapped on the palm of every hand; a digit is a unit of linear measurement derived from the breadth of

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