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Things to do this week in NYC Mar 16-Mar 23: Museums

March 16, 2013 - by CG Directory Editor

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Spring into Norouz! Celebrate the Persian New Year Family Day - Asia Society and Museum
March 16, 2013 - New York

Norouz, the Persian New Year, marks the beginning of spring. Discover the spirit of Norouz with traditional music, dance and crafts from Central Asia and Iran.

Matisse: In Search of True Painting - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through March 17, 2013 - New York

Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was one of the most acclaimed artists working in France during the first half of the twentieth century. The critic Clement Greenberg, writing in The Nation in 1949, called him a "self-assured master who can no more help painting well than breathing." Unbeknownst to many, painting had rarely come easily to Matisse. Throughout his career, he questioned, repainted, and reevaluated his work. He used his completed canvases as tools, repeating compositions in order to compare effects, gauge his progress, and, as he put it, "push further and deeper into true painting." While this manner of working with pairs, trios, and series is certainly not unique to Matisse, his need to progress methodically from one painting to the next is striking. Matisse: In Search of True Painting presents this particular aspect of Matisse's painting process by showcasing forty-nine vibrantly colored canvases. For Matisse, the process of creation was not simply a means to an end but a dimension of his art that was as important as the finished canvas.

Metropolis (1927) - Neue Galerie
March 18, 2013 - New York

Neue Galerie presents a series of documentaries and feature films that engage with central themes of the art on display. These films are selected by the curatorial staff, and shed light on the deeper motivations of artists, give insight into the time period, or demonstrate the ongoing influence of turn-of-the-century art and thought on today's culture. Films are presented free of charge on Mondays at 4 p.m. in Cafe Fledermaus.

Case study #1: Object - Taboo stool - Museum of Arts & Design
March 21, 2013 - New York

For The Global Africa Project, a 2010 exhibition on contemporary visual culture in Africa, MAD included the Taboo stool by the industrial design firm Birsel + Seck. Made of 75 percent recycled plastic and manufactured by a female-owned company in designer Bibi Seck's birthplace of Senegal, Taboo was a groundbreaking design object in multiple ways, as was MAD's choice to present the modest object amid an array of visually dazzling pieces. What conversations are potentially generated by the choice to display or acquire an object, and in today's world of social media and information sharing, what do display and acquisition really mean for institutions and for individuals' Superscript's programmatic counterpoint to their project On Display brings together the public with voices in the design and architecture world to comment on these topics, and thus activate free posters displayed in the exhibition space of After the Museum.

Foraging: Eating From Nature's Garden - American Museum of Natural History
March 21, 2013 - New York

Taste samples from Tama Matsuoka Wong, forager for DANIEL, the renowned New York City restaurant, and author of Foraged Flavor: Finding Fabulous Ingredients in Your Backyard or Farmer's Market. Learn how eating from nature's garden can add deliciousness to the modern dining table. A book signing will follow.

Live From the Control Room - Museum of Arts & Design
March 22, 2013 - New York

Marking the "move-in" for E.S.P. at MAD, Live From the Control Room repurposes MAD's Open Studios into the E.S.P. TV LAB. Hosting a variety of local artists and performers who work with analog systems, as well as broadcast innovators and other voices in the field, Live From the Control Room forms a happening-like environment for discussion, performance, and communal production of experimental broadcast television.

Concrete Escort I, II, III, IV - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
March 22, 2013 - New York

New York-based Japanese performance artist Ei Arakawa invites painters, sculptors, dancers, filmmakers, and archivists to form a temporal group addressing Gutai today. Resulting in a performative exhibition tour of Gutai: Splendid Playground where the audience will be escorted and repositioned, emphasis will be on the power dynamic within Gutai, women and men, singularity and plurality, and performance and painting. Tasked to communicate the diversity of Gutai activities, each tour takes a different route through the exhibition. Followed by a reception. For tickets and more information, visit guggenheim.org/publicprograms.

History of Histories: Afghan Films 1960 to Present - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
March 22, 2013 - New York

Organized by independent curator Leeza Ahmady and artist Mariam Ghani, this series of fiction films, newsreels, and documentaries juxtaposes contemporary work with selections from Afghanistan's national film institute archive, and traces the nation's vibrant history and culture. Mariam Ghani and Leeza Ahmady will introduce the screenings on March 1 and 29.

Free Music Friday - American Folk Art Museum
March 22, 2013 - New York

The museum offers live music and a cash wine bar in the galleries each Friday evening. Hosted by Lara Ewen, the March 22 lineup features acoustic folk from Scott Rudd, lyrically intense songwriting from Adam Day, and powerful vocal and guitar chops from Abby Ahmad. The Museum's first Free Music Fridays CD will also be available for sale, and the 16-track compilation is only $5.

The Place of Provenance - Rubin Museum of Art
Through March 25, 2013 - New York

The fourth in a series of exhibitions curated by the renowned Tibetan scholar David Jackson, The Place of Provenance: Regional Styles in Tibetan Paintingexplores the four distinctive provincial artistic styles of Tibet as well as those of Bhutan, Mongolia, and Qing-dynasty China. Jackson debunks the common Western belief that a single style dominated the majority of these provinces in recent centuries.

Sinister Pop - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

Sinister Pop presents an inventive take on the Museum's rich and diverse holdings of Pop art from the movement's inception in the early 1960s through its aftershocks a decade later. Although Pop art often calls to mind a celebration of postwar consumer culture, this exhibition focuses on Pop's darker side, as it distorts and critiques the American dream. Themes of exaggerated consumption, film noir and the depiction of women in art, the dystopic American landscape, and the intersection of popular culture and politics, are explored through works by acknowledged masters such as Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenburg, Ed Ruscha, and Andy Warhol, as well as by many artists not traditionally associated with Pop whose art may be understood within its wider field of reference. These include William Eggleston, Peter Saul, Christina Ramberg, and Vija Celmins, among others.

Dark and Deadpan: Pop in TV and the Movies - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

From Andy Warhol's commercial for Schrafft's restaurants to Sherman Price's film The Imp-Probable Mr. Weegee, starring Weegee as a crazy photographer, footage of the moon landing, and George Kuchar's mock Hollywood melodrama HOLD ME WHILE I'M NAKED, this exhibition brings together rarely seen films, advertisements, and political campaign messages that reflect the extravagant yet deadpan excess of Pop. Together they reveal the central role played by television and cinema in articulating the excitement, anxiety, and desire underlying both Pop art and popular culture in the 1960s.

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s - Museum of the City of New York
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

Designing Tomorrow: America's World's Fairs of the 1930s showcases six Depression-era expositions that brought visions of a brighter future to tens of millions of Americans. As many Americans still waited on bread lines, fairs in Chicago (1933/34), San Diego (1935/36), Dallas (1936), Cleveland (1936/37), San Francisco (1939/40), and New York (1939/40) foretold much of what would become commonplace in postwar America--from highways and the spread of suburbia to modernist skyscrapers and products such as electric toasters, nylon stockings, and television. The fairs looked forward to an era of prosperity, when ingenuity and innovation would transform not only American cities but also the everyday lives of American citizens. Visitors will see sleek, modern furniture and appliances of the era, vintage footage from the fairs, and futuristic drawings of the New York World's Fair's buildings from the Museum's collection.

3-D Lenticular Posters for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey - Museum of the Moving Image
Through March 31, 2013 - Astoria

Director Peter Jackson filmed The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey in 3-D at 48 frames per second to invite the audience to enter Middle-earth for an immersive cinematic experience. Emblematic of this experience is a series of specially commissioned lenticular posters, featuring seventeen of the main characters in the film, including Bilbo Baggins, Gandalf, Thorin Oakenshield, Gollum, and Galadriel. These posters are being shown only in specialized showcases. They were designed for Comic-Con International in San Diego, which took place in July 2012, and are being exhibited at the world premiere in New Zealand on November 28, 2012, the American premiere on December 6, 2012 in Manhattan, and at two exhibition venues: the high-end Grove shopping center in Los Angeles, and here at Museum of the Moving Image in New York City.

Teachers College: Pioneering Education Through Innovation - New-York Historical Society
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

To commemorate the 125th anniversary of Teachers College, Columbia University, this exhibition features photographs, documents, and artifacts from the oldest and largest graduate school of education in the nation.

Making History, Making Art: The Work of Jonathan Ned Katz - Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

The first solo show of the lifelong West Village resident and renowned historian of gay and queer history Jonathan Ned Katz retraces the creative career of this late-emerging visual artist and underscores the inherent social-historical content of art by illustrating how profoundly a shifting political landscape remade the field for representing sexual difference.

Rare & Raw - The 2013 Queer Caucus Exhibition for the College Art Association - Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
Through March 31, 2013 - New York

A combination of contemporary installations, archival photographs, drawings, ephemera and video, exploring themes of queer history, visibility and notions of representations.

New Wave Finland: Contemporary Photography from the Helsinki School - Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America
Through April 06, 2013 - New York

An exhibition featuring the work of young photographers and video artists from Finland's distinguished Helsinki School. The nine artists exhibited in New Wave Finland -- Pasi Autio, Joakim Eskildsen, Tiina Itkonen, Hannu Karjalainen, Kalle Kataila, Anni Leppala, Niko Luoma, Riitta Paivalainen, and Mikko Sinervo -- illustrate the diversity of the School's distinctive artistic and pedagogical approach.

Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through April 07, 2013 - New York

Although World War II is one of the most documented conflicts of the 20th century, western audiences know very little about the Soviet Jewish photojournalists who captured some of the most riveting and powerful images of the war. Such photographers as Evgenii Khaldei, Georgii Zelma, and Dmitrii Baltermants merged documentary photography with avant-garde modernist sensibilities to create works that have had a profound influence on 20th century art and beyond.

Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through April 07, 2013 - New York

Although World War II is one of the most documented conflicts of the 20th century, western audiences know very little about the Soviet Jewish photojournalists who captured some of the most riveting and powerful images of the war. Such photographers as Evgenii Khaldei, Georgii Zelma, and Dmitrii Baltermants merged documentary photography with avant-garde modernist sensibilities to create works that have had a profound influence on 20th century art and beyond.

Shoe Obsession - Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology
Through April 13, 2013 - New York

Shoe Obsession examines our culture's ever-growing fascination with extravagant and fashionable shoes. Accessories used to be just that?secondary to clothing fashions. Today, however, shoes have become the main fashion story, replacing the "It bag" as the most desirable accessory. High-heeled shoes "the fashion shoes of the 21st century" have become so tall that even a 4-inch heel is considered "low." Shoe Obsession features over 150 examples of the most extraordinary shoe styles of the 21st-century, highlighting the new concepts, constructions, materials, and types of embellishment that have positioned shoes at the height of fashion. The popularity of designer shoes has grown rapidly. The television series Sex in the City, which was broadcast from 1998 to 2004, is often credited with helping to launch the cult for designer shoes. Who can forget Carrie Bradshaw's Manolo Blahnik pumps ? or her assertion of "a woman's right to shoes." Blahnik's popularity paved the way for other high-end shoe designers, a number of whom have become celebrities in their own right. Christian Louboutin's undeniably sexy shoes?with their signature red soles?have established him as one of the best-known footwear designers in the world.

Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 15, 2013 - New York

In 1912, in several European cities, a handful of artists -- Vasily Kandinsky, Frantisek Kupka, Francis Picabia, and Robert Delaunay -- presented the first abstract pictures to the public. Inventing Abstraction, 1910-25 celebrates the centennial of this bold new type of artwork, tracing the development of abstraction as it moved through a network of modern artists, from Marsden Hartley and Marcel Duchamp to Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, sweeping across nations and across media. The exhibition brings together many of the most influential works in abstraction's early history and covers a wide range of artistic production, including paintings, drawings, books, sculptures, films, photographs, sound poems, atonal music, and non-narrative dance, to draw a cross-media portrait of these watershed years.

The Shaping of New Visions: Photography, Film, Photobook - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 21, 2013 - Midtown

This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography's role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements -- with a special emphasis on the medium's relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and Post-Conceptual art -- and in the development of contemporary artistic practices. The shaping of what came to be known as "New Vision" photography bore the obvious influence of "lens-based" and "time-based" works. El Lissitzky best summarized its ethos: "The new world will not need little pictures," he wrote in The Conquest of Art (1922). "If it needs a mirror, it has the photograph and the cinema." Bringing together over 250 works from MoMA's collection, the exhibition features major projects by Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Germaine Krull, Gerhard Ruhm, Helen Levitt, Daido Moriyama, Robert Heinecken, Ed Ruscha, Martha Rosler, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip-Lorca DiCorcia, and Walid Raad, among others. Photographic history is presented as a multivalent history of distinct "new visions," rooted in unconventional and innovative exercises that range from photograms and photomontages to experimental films and photobooks.

Zarina: Paper Like Skin - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through April 21, 2013 - New York

The exhibition Zarina: Paper Like Skin, organized by Allegra Pesenti, Curator, Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, travels to the Guggenheim Museum as part of its international tour. This retrospective of Indian-born American artist Zarina Hashmi is the first major exploration of the artist's career, charting a developmental arc from her work in the 1960s to the present and includes many seminal works from the late 1960s and early 1970s, woodblock prints, etchings and lithographs, and a small selection of related sculptures in bronze and cast paper. The Guggenheim's recent acquisition of 20 works from a major series of pin drawings from 1975 to 1977 serves as a fulcrum for the New York presentation, which is conceived in close collaboration with the artist. An exhibition catalogue provides insights into her life and work. The New York presentation is organized by Sandhini Poddar, Associate Curator, Asian Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

The Path of Nature: French Paintings from the Wheelock Whitney Collection, 1785-1850 - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through April 21, 2013 - New York

In 2003 the Metropolitan Museum acquired a significant group of paintings spanning a key period in European history, beginning with the advent of the French Revolution and concluding with the reign of Louis-Philippe. Assembled by the New York connoisseur Wheelock Whitney between 1972 and 2000, this collection reveals a rich tradition of painting out of doors nearly a century before Impressionism, thus amplifying the role of the natural world as a source of inspiration to artists on the cusp of the modern epoch. This exhibition of fifty paintings is the first to be devoted entirely to the Whitney collection and includes examples by numerous painters who are thought to be represented in no other American museum.

Drawing Surrealism - Morgan Library & Museum
Through April 21, 2013 - New York

Bringing together more than 160 works on paper by such iconic artists as Salvador Dali, Max Ernst, Leonora Carrington, and Joan Miro, this is the first major exhibition to explore the central role of drawing in surrealism, one of the most important movements in twentieth-century art. Once considered a minor medium, drawing became a predominant means of expression and innovation among surrealist artists in the first half of the twentieth century, resulting in a rich array of graphic techniques including automatic drawing, collage, decalcomania, exquisite corpse, and frottage.

German Expressionism 1900-1930: Masterpieces from the Neue Galerie Collection - Neue Galerie
Through April 22, 2013 - New York

The Neue Galerie presents important works of German Expressionism from its permanent collection. The exhibition examines themes of primitivism and modernity, two poles of Expressionism that artists employed to free themselves from the academic conventions of the 19th century.

German & Austrian Decorative Arts from Jugendstil to the Bauhaus: The Harry C. Sigman Gift - Neue Galerie
Through April 22, 2013 - New York

Featuring over 100 works of German and Austrian decorative arts from Los Angeles-based attorney and collector Harry C. Sigman.

Kandinsky 1911-1913 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through April 25, 2013 - New York

Perhaps more than any other 20th-century painter, Vasily Kandinsky (b. 1866, Moscow; d. 1944, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) has been closely linked to the history of the Guggenheim Museum. Hilla Rebay--artist, art advisor, and the museum's first director--promoted nonobjective painting above all other forms of abstraction. She was particularly inspired by the work and writing of Kandinsky, a pioneer of abstraction, who believed that the task of the painter was to convey his own inner world, rather than imitate the natural world. The museum's holdings have grown to include more than 150 works by Kandinsky, and focused exhibitions of his works are presented in the Kandinsky Gallery on Annex Level 3. The current installation, Kandinsky 1911-1913, highlights paintings completed at the moment the artist made great strides toward complete abstraction and published his aesthetic treatise, On the Spiritual in Art (1911, though dated 1912). Also featured are paintings by Robert Delaunay and Franz Marc that were exhibited alongside the work of Kandinsky and others in the landmark 1912 Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) exhibition held at the Moderne Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser in Munich.

Barings in America - An Interactive Investment Experience - Museum of American Finance
Through April 27, 2013 - New York

Barings Bank provided financial backing in the US from the nation's beginning through the industrial revolution. This exhibition explores five of the firm's US investments, some good and some bad. Barings chose to invest in the fledgling government and its industry. Would you have done the same?

Blues for Smoke - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through April 28, 2013 - New York

An interdisciplinary exhibition that explores a wide range of contemporary art through the lens of the blues and the blues aesthetic. Turning to the blues not simply as a musical category but as a field of artistic sensibilities and cultural idioms, the exhibition features works by nearly fifty artists from the 1950s to the present, as well as materials culled from music and popular entertainment. Blues for Smoke was conceived and developed by Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art curator Bennett Simpson, in consultation with the artist Glenn Ligon. The New York installation is being overseen by Whitney curator Chrissie Iles.

Raw/Cooked: Marela Zacarias - Brooklyn Museum
Through April 28, 2013 - Brooklyn

The seventh exhibition in the Raw/Cooked series, titled Supple Beat, presents the work of Gowanus-based artist Marela Zacarias. Recommended by Ramirez Jonas, Zacarias has created four site-specific sculptural works inspired by the Williamsburg Murals, uniting her interests in abstract forms, the history of objects, and urban renewal. Her large-scale pieces appear to be climbing the walls of the Museum's first-floor lobby and Great Hall, interacting with the architecture as if they were murals come to life. Zacarias draws on the concept of resilience implied by the Williamsburg Murals and explores the idea of bouncing back from adversity, relating to the history of the public housing project for which the murals were commissioned and the history of the works themselves. She constructs her unique sculptural forms from window screens and joint compound, which she then paints with original patterns. In Supple Beat, Zacarias's patterns are inspired by the related murals-- unique color palettes and geometric forms. Born and raised in Mexico City, Zacarias has painted more than thirty large-scale public murals. She holds an MFA from Hunter College.

Marcel Proust and Swann's Way: 100th Anniversary - Morgan Library & Museum
Through April 28, 2013 - New York

Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time is one of the most influential and ambitious literary works of all time. The Morgan celebrates the 1913 publication of the first of its seven volumes, Swann's Way, with a fascinating selection of the author's notebooks, preliminary drafts, galley-proofs, and other documents from the collection of the Bibliotheque nationale de France. The works on display will provide unique insight into Proust's creative process and the birth of his masterpiece. Also on view will be period postcards with depictions of Illiers, which served as the inspiration for Proust's fictional town Combray, and Paris. Several letters between Proust and his mother, Jeanne, from the Morgan's collection, will be included.

Julie Buffalohead: Let the Show Begin - National Museum of the American Indian
Through April 28, 2013 - New York

Julie Buffalohead (Ponca) uses the iconography of childhood to explore deeper themes of storytelling, motherhood, and identity in this exhibition of her recent paintings. Soft and cuddly toy animals come to life in her work, but this sweet surface disguises the less pretty realities of parenting such as pain and worry. Buffalohead also uses these characters to attack stereotypes about Native people, exposing their artificiality by staging them as a child's game.

Edvard Munch: The Scream - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 29, 2013 - New York

Edvard Munch's iconic The Scream (1895), among the most celebrated and recognized images in art history, will be on view at The Museum of Modern Art for a period of six months. Of the four versions of The Scream made by Munch between 1893 and 1910, this pastel-on-board from 1895 is the only one remaining in private hands; the three other versions are in the collections of museums in Norway. The Scream is being lent by a private collector.

Modernist Art from India - Radical Terrain - Rubin Museum of Art
Through April 29, 2013 - New York

Radical Terrain is the final exhibition of a three-part series Modernist Art from India, that examines art from post-independence India. Radical Terrain highlights the diverse explorations of landscape in Indian art after independence, showing how landscape was a means for artists to come to terms with the vastness of India as a new nation. Also featured will be new work by international contemporary artists currently working in landscape, to be introduced during the exhibition.

Space Shuttle Enterprise: A Pioneer - Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum
Through April 30, 2013 - New York

"Space Shuttle Enterprise: A Pioneer" -- a new exhibition that explores the history of Enterprise and its critical role in the development of the space shuttle -- will open to the public on Thursday, January 17 at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, located at Pier 86 (46th Street and 12th Avenue) in Manhattan. "Space Shuttle Enterprise: A Pioneer" introduces Enterprise with compelling artifacts of the era -- such as space shuttle cockpit instruments, a flight helmet and model orbiters -- as well as archival images and video clips to illustrate the history and significance of the prototype orbiter. The exhibition celebrates the pilots and engineers who contributed to the Enterprise story in addition to the technological innovations that helped to make it an icon of the space program. This exhibition will also include photographs crowd sourced from the public who have documented Enterprise's journey from its origins in the 1970s to its expedition to the Intrepid Museum last spring. The exhibition will be open to the public through Spring 2013. In April 2012, the space shuttle Enterprise arrived in New York City and in July 2012, Enterprise joined the collection of the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in a temporary, climate-controlled Space Shuttle Pavilion on the Flight Deck. However in late October, Hurricane Sandy damaged the pavilion, and as a result, Enterprise itself is not currently on public display. The exhibition is free with the price of admission to the museum. The museum is currently offering a Gift of Intrepid "buy one, get one free" promotion through February 15, 2013. The special social media offer is available to those who are Facebook fans of the Museum or those who follow the museum on Twitter. Visitors must print and bring with them the special coupon posted. For more information, visit www.intrepidmuseum.org.

Treasures from the Vault - Morgan Library & Museum
Through May 05, 2013 - New York

From Mozart to Machiavelli, there is always something fascinating to explore in the Morgan's historic McKim building. From January 15 to May 5, thirty works from the Morgan's exceptional collections of medieval manuscripts, printed books and bindings, private letters and correspondence, and original music will be on view. Highlights include such treasures as a letter from J. R. R. Tolkien containing his commentary on the creation and critical reception of The Hobbit; a magnificent twelfth-century illuminated manuscript depicting the life, passion, and miracles of St. Edmund; Percy Bysshe Shelley's On Life manuscript; and Beethoven's Tenth Violin Sonata in G Major. The Morgan's important holdings of Americana are represented by a letter from Alexander Hamilton to Martha Washington upon the death of her husband, and a volume of Edward Curtis's monumental The North American Indian, a photographic project funded in part by Pierpont Morgan.

Seismic Shifts: 10 Visionaries in Contemporary Art and Architecture - National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts
Through May 05, 2013 - New York

Featuring works by Nick Cave, Bill Viola, Thornton Dial, Tom Friedman, Vik Muniz, Kate Orff, Betye Saar, and others, highlighting some of the most important artists of today, known for challenging conventions.

The 2013 Annual - National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts
Through May 05, 2013 - New York

A tradition at the Academy since its founding in 1826, the exhibition includes work by recently elected Academy members and highlights their important contribution to American culture.

The Dream Continues: Photographs of Martin Luther King Murals by Vergara - New-York Historical Society
Through May 05, 2013 - New York

Since the 1970s Camilo Vergara has been traveling across the United States photographing and thus documenting hand-painted murals of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as they appeared on the walls of establishments such as car repair shops, barbershops, and fast food restaurants in city streets and alley ways. The folk art portraits have expressed how the inner-city residents saw the slain civil rights leader--at times a statesman, a hero, a visionary, or a martyr. Vergara also discovered that these images were often based on iconic photographs of Dr. King but that, depending upon the neighborhood where they were created, the portraits could take on the likeness of Latinos, Native Americans, or Asians.

Projects 99: Meiro Koizumi - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through May 06, 2013 - New York

Working in video and performance, Meiro Koizumi (Japanese, b. 1976) has built a compelling body of work that deals with power dynamics on scales from the familial to the national, and examines questions of political and psychological control. Implicating himself, his performers, and the viewer through choreographed emotional manipulations, Koizumi creates works that straddle the uncomfortable and indefinable line between cruelty and comedy. His first solo museum presentation in the United States, Projects 99 includes a selection of earlier projects, as well as Defect in Vision (2011), Meiro's most ambitious and accomplished project to date. Probing the idea of blindness -- both philosophical and physical -- the piece is projected on two sides of a single screen, preventing the viewer from taking in both views at once. The action follows two performers who repeatedly enact a domestic scene set during World War II. While staged in the historical past, the scene's portent of impending catastrophe has taken on a new relevance following the Fukushima nuclear disaster, in a work that is incisive, thought-provoking, and visually lush.

Charting Fluxus: George Maciunas's Ambitious Art History - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through May 06, 2013 - New York

Fluxus was an international network of artists active in the 1960s and 1970s. Through the tireless efforts of its founder George Maciunas, Fluxus presented festivals and concerts and distributed artists' multiples, which Maciunas fabricated in his Soho loft. Collective, performative, anti-institutional, and irreverent, Fluxus sought to bridge the gaps between different artistic mediums and between art and life.

Gutai: Splendid Playground - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through May 08, 2013 - New York

As part of the Guggenheim's Asian Art Program, the museum presents North America's first museum exhibition devoted to Gutai, the most influential artists' collective and artistic movement in postwar Japan and one of the most important international avant-garde movements of the 1950s and 1960s. Organized thematically and chronologically to explore Gutai's inventive approach to materials, process, and performativity, the exhibition explores the group's radical experimentation across a range of media and styles and demonstrates how individual artists pushed the limits of what art could be in a postatomic age. The spectrum of works includes painting, experimental performance and film, indoor and outdoor installation art, sound art, interactive or "playful" art, light art, and Kinetic art. The exhibition comprises some 120 objects by 25 artists on loan from museum and private collections in Japan, the United States, and Europe, and offers new scholarship, especially on so-called late Gutai works that date from 1965 to 1972. Gutai: Splendid Playground is organized by Ming Tiampo, Associate Professor of Art History, Carleton University, Ottawa, and Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator of Asian Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. This exhibition is supported in part by The Japan Foundation and the Dedalus Foundation, Inc. The Leadership Committee for Gutai: Splendid Playground is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Degas, Miss La La, and the Cirque Fernando - Morgan Library & Museum
Through May 12, 2013 - New York

For several successive evenings in January 1879, Edgar Degas (1834-1917) attended performances at the Cirque Fernando by one of the most famous circus performers of his time, an aerialist known as Miss La La. For her extraordinary act, Miss La La was slowly hoisted nearly seventy feet into the circus's domed roof, suspended solely from a rope clenched between her teeth. Degas produced a number of studies of the performer and the circus building--drawings, pastels, and an oil sketch--before creating his celebrated painting, Miss La La at the Cirque Fernando. The exhibition brings together for the first time Degas's remarkable painting, on loan from the National Gallery, London, and nearly all of the related preparatory works. Also on view will be images of the Cirque Fernando by Degas's contemporaries, photographs of Miss La La and her troupe, and posters and other printed material.

Tim Lee: In Focus - Asia Society and Museum
Through May 12, 2013 - New York

Made specifically for the Asia Society, artist Tim Lee's Blowin' in the Wind, Bob Dylan, 1963, an interactive multimedia installation, is meant to function as a karaoke pavilion in which the audience is invited to sing along to the accompaniment of the artist's guitar cover of Dylan's iconic folk anthem. The participatory exhibition is meant to provoke a thoughtful consideration of how our understanding of a situation is often relative to our own personal experiences.

Superreal: Alternative Realities in Photography and Video - El Museo Del Barrio
Through May 19, 2013 - New York

This exhibition explores the layered meaning and interpretation of the real as represented through photography and video. Drawing on the presentation of the landscape, the human figure, the world of architecture, objects and natural phenomena, the works in this exhibition explore alternative realities.

Piero della Francesca in America - Frick Collection
Through May 19, 2013 - New York

Revered in his own time as a 'monarch' of painting, Piero della Francesca (1411/13-1492) is acknowledged today as a founding figure of the Italian Renaissance. In early 2013, The Frick Collection will present the first monographic exhibition in the United States dedicated to the artist. It brings together seven works by Piero della Francesca, including six panels from the Saint' Agostino altarpiece -- the largest number from this masterwork ever reassembled. They will be joined by the Virgin and Child Enthroned with Attendant Angels, his only intact altarpiece in this country. Piero della Francesca in America is organized by the Frick's Andrew W. Mellon Fellow and guest curator Nathaniel Silver.

Audubon's Aviary: Part I of the Complete Flock - New-York Historical Society
Through May 19, 2013 - New York

To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the New-York Historical Society's purchase of the Audubon avian watercolors and the the release of the lavishly illustrated book Audubon's Aviary: The Original Watercolors for "The Birds of America"―published by the New-York Historical Society and Skira/Rizzoli and winner of a 2013 New York Book Show Award--the New-York Historical Society plans a sweeping three-part exhibition to showcase every masterpiece from its unparalleled collection of John James Audubon's preparatory watercolor models for the sumptuous double-elephant-folio print edition of The Birds of America (1827-38). Over three years Audubon's Aviary: The Complete Flock (Parts I-III), will feature all 474 stunning avian watercolors by Audubon in the collection, alongside engaging state-of-the-art media installations that will provide a deeper understanding of the connection between art and nature.

No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through May 22, 2013 - New York

The Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative identifies and supports a network of curators and artists from South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa in a comprehensive five-year program involving curatorial residencies, acquisitions for the Guggenheim's collection, international touring exhibitions, and far-reaching educational activities. The first exhibition, No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia, organized by June Yap, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, South and Southeast Asia, will open at the Guggenheim Museum on February 22, 2013. The exhibition focuses on the artistic practices and cultural traditions of that region, which includes Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and India. The artworks in the exhibition, along with others acquired as part of Guggenheim UBS MAP, will enter the Guggenheim's permanent collection under the auspices of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund.

Artist and Visionary: William Matthew Prior Revealed - American Folk Art Museum
Through May 26, 2013 - New York

Organized by the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York, this exhibition includes more than 40 oil paintings spanning William Matthew Prior's career from 1824 to 1856. Through his pragmatic marketing strategy, Prior was able to document the faces of middle-class Americans throughout his lifetime, making art accessible to a previously overlooked group. A versatile artist, Prior is well known not only for the skill and range of his technique but for the diversity of his sitters. Prior's involvement with Millerism (early Adventism) was instrumental in his personal development as well as providing access to new clients, including many African Americans.

Women's Studies - American Folk Art Museum
Through May 26, 2013 - New York

The late twentieth century has seen great strides for women working within visual mediums, yet the male gaze persists as the primary perspective from which women are considered -- and thus perceived - in film and art. This exhibition presents drawings and photographs of women by four self-taught artists from the1940s through the late twentieth century, two male, two female. Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Paul D. Humphrey, Nellie Mae Rowe, and Inez Nathaniel Walker offer four very different approaches that raise questions of intent, portrayal, and self-identity: Are the portraits acts of creation or acts of documentation, mimesis or wish fulfillment? Are self-taught artists immune from the pervasive male gaze of mainstream artmaking spheres, or do they reflect a gender divide that still runs deeply within American society?

Fine Lines: American Drawings from the Brooklyn Museum - Brooklyn Museum
Through May 26, 2013 - Brooklyn

Fine Lines: American Drawings from the Brooklyn Museum presents a selection of over 100 of the finest, rarely seen drawings and sketchbooks from the Museum's world-renowned collection of American art. Produced between 1768 and 1945 in a wide range of media (including graphite, pen and ink, crayon, charcoal, and pastel), the featured objects represent a variety of iconographies, styles, and practices in the history of American graphic arts. More than seventy artists are represented, including Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, Edward Hopper, and Marsden Hartley. The exhibition is organized into six thematic sections, examining portraiture, nudes, the clothed figure, narrative subjects, and natural and urban environments. It is accompanied by a scholarly catalogue including interpretive essays, illustrated catalogue entries, and a selected bibliography.

NYC 1993: Experimental, Jet Set, Trash and No Star - New Museum
Through May 26, 2013 - New York

"NYC 1993" looks at art made and exhibited in New York over the course of one year, providing a synchronic panorama in which established artists and emerging figures of the time are presented alongside the work of authors whose influence has since faded from the discussion.

Ashe to Amen: African Americans and Biblical Imagery - Museum of Biblical Art
Through May 26, 2013 - New York

The remarkable wealth and breadth of African American artists' interpretations of Biblical stories and traditions in historic and contemporary art is the subject of a loan exhibition investigating the ever-shifting intersections and crossroads of aesthetics and belief. Themes that recur throughout Ashe to Amen include creation, revelation, faith, liberation, and identity.

Reaching Out - American Bible Society and the African American Community - Museum of Biblical Art
Through May 26, 2013 - New York

An exhibit tracing American Bible Society's relationship with the African American community built through Bible publication and distribution.

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter! - American Museum of Natural History
Through May 27, 2013 - New York

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter!, a perennial favorite visited by millions of children and adults, returns to the American Museum of Natural History. This popular winter attraction invites visitors to mingle with up to 500 iridescent butterflies fluttering among blooming tropical flowers and lush green vegetation inside a free-standing, balmy, 1,200-square-foot enclosure.

WWII & NYC - New-York Historical Society
Through May 27, 2013 - Upper West Side

When World War II broke out, New York was a cosmopolitan, heavily immigrant city, whose people had real stakes in the war and strongly held opinions. WWII & NYC will explore the impact of the war on the metropolis, which played a critical role in the national war effort, and how the city was forever changed.

The Hugo Boss Prize 2012 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through May 27, 2013 - New York

The Hugo Boss Prize is a biennial award founded in 1996 to honor significant achievement in contemporary art. From a group of six finalists selected by an international jury of curators, Danh Vo was announced as the winner of the ninth prize on November 1, 2012. A solo exhibition of his work will be presented at the Guggenheim in spring 2013. Previous winners include Matthew Barney (1996), Douglas Gordon (1998), Marjetica Potrc (2000), Pierre Huyghe (2002), Rirkrit Tiravanija (2004), Tacita Dean (2006), Emily Jacir (2008), and Hans-Peter Feldmann (2010). The Hugo Boss Prize 2012 is organized by Katherine Brinson, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and is made possible by HUGO BOSS.

Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 27, 2013 - New York

Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity will present a revealing look at the role of fashion in the works of the Impressionists and their contemporaries. Some eighty major figure paintings, seen in concert with period costumes, accessories, fashion plates, photographs, and popular prints, will highlight the vital relationship between fashion and art during the pivotal years, from the mid-1860s to the mid-1880s, when Paris emerged as the style capital of the world. With the rise of the department store, the advent of ready-made wear, and the proliferation of fashion magazines, those at the forefront of the avant-garde -- from Manet, Monet, and Renoir to Baudelaire, Mallarme, and Zola -- turned a fresh eye to contemporary dress, embracing la mode as the harbinger of la modernite. The novelty, vibrancy, and fleeting allure of the latest trends in fashion proved seductive for a generation of artists and writers who sought to give expression to the pulse of modern life in all its nuanced richness. Without rivaling the meticulous detail of society portraitists such as Tissot or Stevens or the graphic flair of fashion plates, the Impressionists nonetheless engaged similar strategies in the making (and in the marketing) of their pictures of stylish men and women that sought to reflect the spirit of their age.

After Photoshop Manipulated Photography in the Digital Age - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 27, 2013 - New York

This installation explores various ways in which artists, including Nancy Burson, Filip Dujardin, Joan Fontcuberta, Beate Gutschow, and others, have used digital technology to alter the photographic image from the 1980s to the present.

Street - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 27, 2013 - New York

Street, a new video by the British-born artist James Nares, forms the centerpiece of this exhibition. Over the course of a week in September 2011, Nares -- a New Yorker since 1974 -- ecorded sixteen hours of footage of people on the streets of Manhattan from a moving car using a high-definition camera usually used to record fast-moving subjects such as speeding bullets and hummingbirds. He then greatly slowed his source material, editing down the results to one hour of steady, continuous motion and scoring it with music for twelve-string guitar composed and performed by his friend Thurston Moore, co-founder of Sonic Youth.

Louis Armstrong at Freedomland - Louis Armstrong House Museum
Through May 31, 2013 - Corona

The story of the early 1960s is in many ways a story of freedom. In the United States, African-Americans were growing more vocal in their struggle for Civil Rights. A nation turned with hope to young president John F. Kennedy to lead them through the Cold War. The Berlin Wall was constructed in August 1961, splitting one of Europe's biggest cities in half. The Vietnam War was beckoning. Looking to escape the often volatile reports on the nightly news, Americans looked for escape in this era through sporting events, television and even in amusement parks, most notably Disneyland. After helping Disneyland open in 1955, that park's Vice President, Cornelius Vanderbilt Wood Jr. left and began his own corporation, focusing on designing a New York version of the park. On June 19, 1960, Freedomland U.S.A., "The World's Largest Entertainment Center," opened in the Bronx in front of a crowd of 63,000 guests. Though the 85-acre park was larger than Disneyland, it was already in debt by its second year and would close in 1964 after just five seasons. Beginning in 1961, Freedomland's "Moon Bowl" (echoing the era's "space race) became a venue for some of the top entertainment acts in America, including Chubby Checker, Tony Bennett, and Louis Armstrong, who performed there in 1961 and 1964. The Louis Armstrong House Museum's vast collections contain many precious artifacts and previously unseen photographs by Jack Bradley, helping "Louis Armstrong at Freedomland" to paint an intimate portrait of Armstrong on stage and off during this turbulent time in history, spreading joy to fans young and old with his integrated band of All Stars.

Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through June 02, 2013 - New York

Featuring nearly 150 of DeFeo's works, many of which will be exhibited for the first time. The show traces motifs and themes the artist examined throughout her career in drawings, photographs, collages, jewelry, and the monumental paintings for which she is best known.

The Artful Recluse: Painting, Poetry, and Politics in 17th-Century China - Asia Society and Museum
Through June 02, 2013 - New York

This is the first exhibition to explore the theme of reclusion in Chinese painting and calligraphy within the broader context of political and social changes during the seventeenth century, a time of rich cultural expression and dramatic political change. The rise of major schools of regional painting as well as the trauma of the Ming dynasty's collapse in 1644 and the Manchu Qing conquest provided an extraordinary context for the creation of historically conscious, often emotionally charged and deeply personal paintings and works of calligraphy. These images, however varied, share an overarching theme of reclusion, a concept of withdrawal and disengagement that has deep and significant roots in China, and which remains relevant in contemporary Chinese art and culture. The exhibition comprises works from public and private collections in the United States and Asia.

Honey, I Rearranged the Collection - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through June 02, 2013 - Bronx

Created in 1986, the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection has assembled over the years a remarkable group of artworks that convey not only personal narratives but also incisive insights onto contemporary life. For this exhibition, we took inspiration from Allen Ruppersberg's ongoing series Honey, I rearranged the Collection initiated in 2000 and that puts in check the role of institutions, curators and collectors as the bearers of tradition and arbiters of taste. Overlaying different traditions, styles, and narratives, Honey, I rearranged the Collection presents an idea of museum as a restless play of combination. Honey, I Rearranged the Collection features artworks from the 40th Anniversary's 40 Years, 40 Gifts campaign, which has received support from Ford Foundation and the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust, as well as individual funders.

Bronx Lab - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through June 02, 2013 - Bronx

A forum and test site for new ideas, BRONX LAB engages audiences in topics relevant to our surrounding communities. Through different social media platforms as well as hands-on activities, viewers will be asked to interact with the exhibition's main themes and exercise their critical views. Drawing primarily from the Museum's permanent collection, BRONX LAB's first exhibition will look at the explosion of graffiti art that happened in the South Bronx in the late 1970s, featuring artworks by Rigoberto Torres, Tim Rollins and KOS, Glendalys Medina, Keith Haring and William Borroughs, Valeri Larko, Lady K. Fever, among others.

Wear It or Not: Recent Jewelry Acquisitions - Museum of Arts & Design
Through June 02, 2013 - New York

Over the past five years, MAD has collected nearly 200 exceptional pieces of art jewelry. From iconic mid-twentieth-century works to computer-designed musical jewelry, Wear It or Not: Recent Jewelry Acquisitions showcases the depth and variety of the new additions to the museum's renowned permanent collection. The exhibition will feature nearly 130 works from around the world, with objects by artists such as Claire Falkenstein, Olaf Skoogfors and Art Smith from the studio jewelry movement of the 1950s and 60s; several silver neckpieces and cuffs from India; alongside more recent works by emerging, mid-career and established jewelry artists such as Melanie Bilenker, Kat Cole, Mari Ishikawa, Keith Lewis, Jeremy May, Edward Lane McCartney, Iris Nieuwenburg, Arjen Noordeman and Christie Wright, Beverley Price, Axel Russmeyer, Sakurako Shimizu, Verena Sieber-Fuchs and Kiff Slemmons. The exhibition will explore a range of jewelry making techniques, including computer design and digital fabrication, as well as the use of uncommon and unexpected materials to carry contemporary art jewelry beyond its decorative function into new creative realms of conceptual, social and political resonance.

Vandy Rattana: Bomb Ponds - Asia Society and Museum
Through June 02, 2013 - New York

A series of photographs and a one-channel video by Cambodian artist Vandy Rattana (b. 1980) that explores the U.S. bombing of Cambodia during the Vietnam War.

Pop Shop Tokyo - New-York Historical Society
Through June 02, 2013 - Upper West Side

In honor of the installation of the ceiling from Keith Haring's famous Pop Shop above the new admissions area in the Robert H. and Clarice Smith New York Gallery of American History, the New-York Historical Society, in collaboration with the Keith Haring Foundation, has created a rotating display devoted to the Pop Shop in the Henry Luce III Center for the Study of American Culture. The ceiling is a gift from the Haring Foundation, and all items in the Luce Center display are on loan from Foundation.

Takeshi Murata : Mortality - Museum of Arts & Design
Through June 04, 2013 - New York

Underlining the temporality of nostalgia, memory, and narratives crafted through cinematic pop culture, the American artist Takeshi Murata has constructed a body of animated works that explore the lifespan of moving images and their role in the shaping of shared cultural histories.

Edo Pop: The Graphic Impact of Japanese Prints - Japan Society
Through June 09, 2013 - New York

Edo Pop playfully juxtaposes classic ukiyo-e prints from such masters as Katsushika Hokusai and Utagawa Hiroshige with contemporary works inspired by these artists and their works. Delve into alluring worlds created by the power of Edo period and contemporary popular culture in which change is the only constant.

Joan Semmel: A Lucid Eye - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through June 09, 2013 - Bronx

Well known for the uncompromising feminist tone of her early work, Joan Semmel has turned her attention over the past decade to the process of image making. Photography has played a central role in Semmel's work since she decided to represent the figure in the early 1970s. However, Semmel's use of photography has often escaped the viewer whose attention focuses on the depicted image. In 2005, Semmel began to afford the viewer a glimpse into her method by aiming the camera towards a mirror, thus capturing the artist in the process of composing the image. Lately, using the camera and mirrors, Semmel has created a haunting series of self-portraits that evoke the passage of time. Organized by Antonio Sergio Bessa.

After the Museum - The Home Front 2013 - Museum of Arts & Design
Through June 09, 2013 - New York

Transforming the physical and contextual environment of the museum into a focal point for the NYC design community, the Museum of Arts and Design's annual design program, The Home Front: American Design Now, expands into its first physical exhibition, After the Museum. Gathering a variety of unique design voices from throughout NYC, After the Museum utilizes the institution as a platform for launching new, radical and unorthodox proposals for contemporary art and design museums in the 21st century. As artists, designers, and corporations have increasingly begun to stage exhibitions, lectures, and workshops modeled from the role of museums in the 20th century, current museum forms are increasingly called into question. Reacting to this new cultural reality, After the Museum stages and presents a series of installations and programs that reveal the largely hidden research component of the design practice, while examining cultural institution's role in the shaping of design past, present, and future.

Aesthetic Ambitions: Edward Lycett and Brooklyn's Faience Manufacturing Company - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 16, 2013 - Brooklyn

This exhibition highlights the nearly fifty-year career of ceramicist Edward Lycett (American, 1833-1910), creative director of the Faience Manufacturing Company from 1884 to 1890. The range of works illustrates Lycett's talent and adaptability to stylistic changes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as his vision for Faience, a company based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, that earned acclaim for producing ornamental wares that introduced a new standard of excellence in American ceramics. These bold and eclectic pieces synthesized Japanese, Chinese, and Islamic influences characteristic of the Aesthetic movement and were sold in the United States' foremost art ware emporiums, including Tiffany & Company. Among the ceramics on view are 39 Faience pieces, including a number of large-scale vases. Also on view are Lycett's formula books, family photographs, and other ephemera; rare examples of ceramic works by his three sons; and other Brooklyn-made ceramics from the Museum's collection.

The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec: Drawings and Prints from the Clark - Frick Collection
Through June 16, 2013 - New York

The Frick Collection presents approximately sixty prints and drawings from the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, renowned for its rich holdings in nineteenth-century French art. The works were selected by Colin B. Bailey, Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, Susan Grace Galassi, Senior Curator at the Frick, and Jay A. Clarke, Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Clark. The selection focuses on several artistic visionaries of the nineteenth century, including Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Gauguin, and Toulouse-Lautrec.

C.Maxx Stevens: House of Memory - National Museum of the American Indian
Through June 16, 2013 - New York

C.Maxx Stevens (Seminole/Muscogee) is a visual storyteller whose deeply personal, eclectic constructions tell stories about places and people from her past. Working with "found objects" and ephemeral materials such as paper, wood and hair, her art has a dark, gritty quality that is both haunting and familiar. The selected sculpture, installation and prints in this solo exhibition address memory through cultural and personal symbols, and illustrate the complexities of the contemporary Native experience.

Sleeping Eros - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through June 23, 2013 - New York

The exhibition focuses on the Museum's statue of Sleeping Eros, one of the finest of the few surviving ancient bronze statues from antiquity. It will explore a number of topics associated with this work, including the issue of originals and copies in Greek and Roman sculpture, new research that suggests it is a Hellenistic bronze that was restored in antiquity, and its original function and ancient context. The exhibition will also present the cult and image of Eros before and after the development of the Sleeping Eros statue type to show its enormous

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