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Things to do this week in NYC May 26-Jun 2: Museums
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May 26, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

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Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Whitney Biennial 2012 - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through May 27, 2012 - Upper East Side

This year marks the seventy-sixth edition of the Whitney's signature exhibition. Closed Mon. & Tues. $18.

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter! - American Museum of Natural History
Through May 28, 2012 - Upper West Side

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter!, a perennial favorite visited by millions of children and adults, returns to the American Museum of Natural History. This popular winter attraction invites visitors to mingle with up to 500 iridescent butterflies fluttering among blooming tropical flowers and lush green vegetation inside a free-standing, balmy, 1,200-square-foot enclosure.

The Coe Collection of American Indian Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 28, 2012 -

Drawn from works given and bequeathed to the Metropolitan during the past decade by Ralph T. Coe of Santa Fe, New Mexico, the exhibition will be comprised of some thirty objects made in natural materials from stone to animal hide. It will feature a wide range of Native American works that come from different times, different places, and numerous distinct peoples.

The oldest pieces in the Coe Collection date to some thousands of years B.C.E. The major part of the collection dates from the nineteenth to early twentieth century, a period of great contact between Native Americans and outsiders of all sorts, from traders to missionaries to the U.S. army. The peoples of the Great Plains are prominent during this time, and objects such as the impressive, personalized hide shirts of important Indian men have come to identify American Indians in the public mind. Representing contemporary work, an imposing sculpture of a Noble Woman by the Northwest Coast Haida artist Robert Davidson, dated to 2001, will be on view—the product of a long, deeply felt tradition for the carving of wood.

Question Bridge: Black Males - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 03, 2012 -

Question Bridge: Black Males is an innovative video installation created by artists Hank Willis Thomas and Chris Johnson in collaboration with Bayete Ross Smith and Kamal Sinclair. The four collaborators spent several years traveling throughout the United States, speaking with 150 Black men living in 12 American cities and towns, including New York, Chicago, Oakland, Birmingham, and New Orleans. From these interviews they created 1,500 video exchanges in which the subjects, representing a range of geographic, generational, economic, and educational strata, serve as both interviewers and interviewees. Their words were woven together to simulate a stream-of-consciousness dialogue, through which important themes and issues emerge, including family, love, interracial relationships, community, education, violence, and the past, present, and future of Black men in American society. The exhibition includes multiple screens playing videos of the interviews, edited so that it appears as if the men are having a conversation. The artists hope that the Question Bridge project will be a catalyst for constructive dialogue that will help deconstruct stereotypes about Black male identity in our collective consciousness. Museum visitors are also invited to visit the user-generated Question Bridge website, accessible on iPads throughout the gallery, which offers a platform to represent and redefine Black male identity in America.

The Steins Collect - Matisse, Picasso, and the Parisian Avant-Garde - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through June 03, 2012 -

Gertrude Stein, her brothers Leo and Michael, and Michael's wife Sarah were important patrons of modern art in Paris during the first decades of the twentieth century. This exhibition unites some two hundred works of art to demonstrate the significant impact the Steins' patronage had on the artists of their day and the way in which the family disseminated a new standard of taste for modern art. The Steins' Saturday evening salons introduced a generation of visitors to recent developments in art, particularly the work of their close friends Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, long before it was on view in museums.

Beginning with the art that Leo Stein collected when he arrived in Paris in 1903 -- including paintings and prints by Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas, Paul Gauguin, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir -- the exhibition traces the evolution of the Steins' taste and examines the close relationships formed between individual members of the family and their artist friends. While focusing on works by Matisse and Picasso, the exhibition also includes paintings, sculpture, and works on paper by Pierre Bonnard, Maurice Denis, Juan Gris, Marie Laurencin, Jacques Lipchitz, Henri Manguin, Andre Masson, Elie Nadelman, Francis Picabia, and others.

The Deutsche Bank Series at the Guggenheim: Being Singular Plural - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through June 06, 2012 - New York

The Deutsche Bank Series at the Guggenheim: Being Singular Plural presents new film, video, and sound-based works by seven of the most innovative and visionary contemporary artists, filmmakers, and media practitioners living and working in India today. Expanding on its original 2010 Deutsche Guggenheim presentation, the exhibition presents eight projects dispersed among the museum?s Annex galleries, New Media Theater, and outdoors along the exterior ramp leading from Fifth Avenue down to the Sackler Center for Arts Education. The New York installation continues to focus on artistic production in South Asia including with works by: Desire Machine Collective (Sonal Jain and Mriganka Madhukaillya), Shumona Goel and Shai Heredia, Amar Kanwar, and Kabir Mohanty and Vikram Joglekar. The exhibition is part of the Guggenheim?s Asian Art Program and is organized by Sandhini Poddar, Associate Curator, Asian Art. Accompanied by a fully illustrated exhibition catalogue, this exhibition is made possible by Deutsche Bank. The Leadership Committee for Being Singular Plural is gratefully acknowledged.

Glasstress New York: New Art from the Venice Biennales - Museum of Arts & Design
Through June 10, 2012 -

The Museum of Arts and Design is proud to present Glasstress New York: New Art from the Venice Biennales an extraordinary international gathering of glass sculpture created in Murano at the studio of entrepreneur and mentor Adriano Berengo. Berengo, the founder of Venice Projects, has engaged artists, architects and designers from such diverse countries as the United States, China, Italy, Germany, The Netherlands, and Spain. The resulting works were originally commissioned for and presented at the Venice Biennials of 2009 and 2011. The pieces are dramatic and often provocative, ranging from independent sculptures to installations incorporating sounds and light to prototypes for production. The spirit of innovation and experimentation pervades the works in this exhibition; many of the artists and designers were given their first opportunity to work with this challenging medium, and in collaboration with the brilliantly capable master glass artisans assembled by Adriano Berengo.

Artists featured in the exhibition include: Jan Fabre, Michael Joo, Jaime Hayon, Patricia Urquiola, Tony Oursler and Mike + Doug Starn to name a few.

Harlem 1970-2009, A Study in Transitions by Camilo Jose Vergara - New-York Historical Society
Through June 10, 2012 - Upper West Side

This exhibition of photographs by Camilo Jose Vergara will be shown in two cycles: Harlem: The People and Harlem: The Place. Vergara's images serve as powerful and poignant witness to the changes that have occurred over the past four decades in one of the most famous neighborhoods of New York City. Known as the capital of black America, Harlem is a place that has been home to many in the civil rights movement. However, this dynamic part of the city north of Central Park is defined by not only its residents, but also by the physical environment; buildings, which, viewed repeatedly over time, have an organic quality of their own. The first installation (February 17 - June 10, 2012) is defined by the personalities and people of Harlem and the second cycle will focus upon the bricks and mortar; those buildings that tell their own stories.

Hero, Villian, Yeti - The Rubin Museum
Through June 11, 2012 - New York

Comic book storylines have drawn on Tibet's cultural and religious traditions for more than sixty years, mixing reality with myths and long-held stereotypes. Featuring more than fifty comic books from around the world, Hero, Villain, Yeti sheds light on global perceptions of Tibet as reflected in and informed by these diverse narratives.

Cindy Sherman - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through June 11, 2012 - Manhattan

Cindy Sherman (American, b. 1954) is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential artists in contemporary art. Throughout her career, she has presented a sustained, eloquent, and provocative exploration of the construction of contemporary identity and the nature of representation, drawn from the unlimited supply of images from movies, TV, magazines, the Internet, and art history. Working as her own model for more than 30 years, Sherman has captured herself in a range of guises and personas which are at turns amusing and disturbing, distasteful and affecting. To create her photographs, she assumes multiple roles of photographer, model, makeup artist, hairdresser, stylist, and wardrobe mistress. With an arsenal of wigs, costumes, makeup, prosthetics, and props, Sherman has deftly altered her physique and surroundings to create a myriad of intriguing tableaus and characters, from screen siren to clown to aging socialite. Bringing together more than 170 photographs, this retrospective survey traces the artist's career from the mid 1970s to the present. Highlighted in the exhibition are in-depth presentations of her key series, including the groundbreaking series "Untitled Film Stills" (1977-80), the black-and-white pictures that feature the artist in stereotypical female roles inspired by 1950s and 1960s Hollywood, film noir, and European art-house films; her ornate history portraits (1989-90), in which the artist poses as aristocrats, clergymen, and milkmaids in the manner of old master paintings; and her larger-than-life society portraits (2008) that address the experience and representation of aging in the context of contemporary obsessions with youth and status. The exhibition will explore dominant themes throughout Sherman's career, including artifice and fiction; cinema and performance; horror and the grotesque; myth, carnival, and fairy tale; and gender and class identity. Also included are Sherman's recent photographic murals (2010), which will have their American premiere at MoMA. In conjunction with the exhibition, Sherman has selected films from MoMA's collection, which will be screened in MoMA's theaters during the course of the exhibition. A major publication will accompany the exhibition.

A Year With Children 2012 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through June 13, 2012 -

In its 41st year, Learning Through Art (LTA), the pioneering arts education program of the Guggenheim Museum, presents A Year with Children 2012, an exhibition organized by the Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Guggenheim Museum and on view at the museum from May 11 to June 13, 2012. This annual exhibition showcases select artworks by students in grades two through six from eleven public schools who participated in LTA during the 2011-12 school year, representing New York City's five boroughs. Approximately one hundred creative and imaginative works, including drawings, prints, photographs, sculptures, paintings, assemblage, and outdoor site-specific art, will be on display during this five-week installation. This year, in addition to works being shown in the Annex Level 3 Gallery, the exhibition will use interstitial spaces in the museum to display projects. Two site-specific installations designed and built by third graders at PS 48 in Staten Island will be shown on the museum's terrace and will be visible to visitors from the Monitor 3 gallery. Works by third grade students from PS 9 in Brooklyn -- transparencies that show multiple layers of their identity -- will also be installed on the gallery's windows. A Year with Children 2012 is organized by the Learning Through Art staff: Greer Kudon, Senior Education Manager; Alyson Luck, Education Associate; and Michelle Hagewood, Education Associate. For more information about Learning Through Art, please visit www.guggenheim.org/lta.

Francesca Woodman - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through June 13, 2012 - New York

Francesca Woodman, the most comprehensive exhibition in the U.S. of the artist’s work since Woodman’s untimely death in 1981 at the age of 22, will be presented at the Guggenheim Museum from March 16 through June 13, 2012. Spanning the breadth of her production, the exhibition includes more than 120 vintage photographs, artist books, and a selection of recently discovered and rarely seen short videos, presenting an historical reconsideration of Woodman’s brief but extraordinary career. Francesca Woodman is organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA). The exhibition has been curated by Corey Keller, Associate Curator of Photography, SFMOMA, where it opened in November 2011. The New York presentation of Francesca Woodman is organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The Leadership Committee for 2012 Exhibitions of Photography is gratefully acknowledged.

Raw/Cooked: Heather Hart - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 24, 2012 -

The fourth exhibition in the Raw/Cooked series presents the work of Bedford-Stuyvesant-based artist Heather Hart. Hart built a large-scale structure titled The Eastern Oracle: We Will Tear the Roof Off the Mother for display in the Museum's fifth-floor rotunda. She describes the work as "an independent rooftop, removed from its house, and dropped from the sky to live its own life in a new context. A rooftop can refer to home, stability, or shelter, but in this context, it is also an action of reclaiming power." The work makes reference to the Museum's ancient Egyptian and African collections and to the Jan Martense Schenck House, a two-room structure built in 1676 that is Brooklyn's second-oldest example of Dutch-American architecture, and the oldest architecture in the Museum's period room collection.

Phyllida Barlow: siege - New Museum
Through June 24, 2012 - New York

"Phyllida Barlow: siege" is the first New York solo exhibition of the work of British sculptor. For her New Museum presentation, Barlow will create a new, site-specific sculptural installation in the Museum's fourth floor gallery. This exhibition is part of a series focusing on a single project or body of work within an artist's larger practice. The series began last May with presentations by Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Gustav Metzger. Barlow has been a seminal influence on British sculpture for the past forty years, having taught a generation of notable British artists. She began making work in the early 1970s, breaking away from earlier British sculpture exemplified by the formal abstractions of artists such as Anthony Caro. Inspired by American sculptors like Eva Hesse, Barlow embraced a mode of working that drew stronger ties between the sculpture and the artist's body. She also took on a broader and more experimental approach to the materials she manipulates. Her works consist of disparate substances such as concrete, felt, wooden pallets, polystyrene, and fabric, often within the same work. These materials are a reflection of the urban environment in which she works and are often sourced directly from the streets. Barlow's sculpture takes on an ephemeral, contingent quality as works assembled on site will often be broken down after an exhibition and recycled into future work. Since the beginning of her career, Barlow's sculptures have been appreciated for their playful formalism and the relationship they have to the built environment -- often inspired by objects that direct or impede our movement through space. Barriers, scaffolding, and security fences are reinterpreted into rough-hewn constructions with exuberantly painted surfaces. Assembling her sculptures quickly and intuitively, they become distant memories of objects rather than faithful reconstructions. In her installations, Barlow scales her work to fully inhabit and transform a given architectural space. Ranging from intimately scaled objects occupying corners and corridors, to works that take on an imposing and overwhelming scale, her installations challenge and parody the heroic monumentalism of her predecessors. Barlow reveals that sculpture can accurately capture the joyfulness, absurdity, and transience of life. Phyllida Barlow was born in 1944 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England. She currently lives and works in London, England. Barlow attended Chelsea School of Art, London, and then the Slade School of Fine Art, London, graduating in 1966. She taught sculpture in London art schools for over forty years, retiring in 2008. She has had solo exhibitions at venues including the Henry Moore Foundation, Leeds, England (1995), Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, England (2004), BAWAG Contemporary, Vienna, Austria (2010), and the Kunstverein Nurnberg, Germany (2011). Barlow has participated in group exhibitions at the Kunstmuseum Basel, Switzerland, Bergen Kunsthall, Norway, Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany, and with Nairy Baghramian at the Serpentine Gallery, London. She is the recipient of the 2012 Aachen prize and will have an exhibition at the Ludwig Forum, Aachen, Germany, also in May 2012. "Phyllida Barlow: siege" is curated by Gary Carrion-Murayari, Curator.

Ellen Altfest: Head and Plant - New Museum
Through June 24, 2012 - New York

This May in the Lobby Gallery, the New Museum will feature the first solo museum presentation of the work of New York-based artist Ellen Altfest. Altfest is a figurative painter whose intimately scaled works convey a distinct approach to realism and a sustained commitment to looking. Her painstaking depictions result in paintings that expand perception while exposing overlooked or under-appreciated aspects of her subject matter. Painting from life, over a long period of time, she chooses subjects ranging from plants, rocks, logs, and gourds to a more recent fascination with the male figure. The exhibition at the New Museum will present a group of works from this latest series.

Folds of skin, an opened armpit, a tuft of hair, the delicate veins in the hand -- discrete elements of ordinary male bodies -- are intensely scrutinized and rendered in exquisite detail with immeasurable care. A universe of information lies within the shallow depth of field and thin layers of oil paint that comprise each work. This excess of information renders Altfest's figures unfamiliar and abstract, as if one were seeing these parts of the body for the first time.

Eschewing traditional compositional formats in favor of unexpected cropping and juxtapositions, Altfest creates a compelling friction in the picture plane. Head and Plant (2010), as the title denotes, is a painting of a male head and a potted cactus. The conventions of portraiture are upended, however, by Altfest's decision to obstruct the face of the male figure with a plant. Instead of an identifiable visage, one is met with the confounding presence of a cactus, whose intrusion appears as matter of fact as it is absurd. The Back (2008-2009) depicts a body on its side, turned away from the viewer. Errant hairs, pink blemishes, and the curve of a shoulder blade serve as landmarks on this vast expanse of corporeality. With a heightened sense of realism and a narrowing of focus, Altfest reveals the extraordinary complexity of ordinary things.

Ellen Altfest was born in 1970 in New York City. She received her MFA from Yale University and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2002. She has been awarded residencies at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, where she presented a solo exhibition, and the Dorland Mountain Art Colony, Temecula, California. Her work was included in 'USA Today' at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, the National Academy Museum's Annual Exhibition in New York and will be featured in 'It is what it is. Or is it?' at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. She currently lives and works in New York City. 'Ellen Altfest: Head and Plant' is curated by Jenny Moore, Assistant Curator.

Unnatural Formations: Three Contemporary Photographers - Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America
Through June 30, 2012 - New York

The American-Scandinavian Foundation celebrates the 100th anniversary of its Fellowship program with an exhibition featuring the work of three recent grant recipients -- Stephen Hilyard, Simen Johan, and Lydia Anne McCarthy – who have emerged as innovators in the field of contemporary landscape photography. The exhibition offers a unique look at hybrid photographs where disparate and sometimes dissonant images are woven together to create new, hypothetical landscapes.

Dan Flavin: Drawing - Morgan Library & Museum
Through July 01, 2012 -

Best known for his fluorescent light installations, Dan Flavin was also an avid draftsman. This first retrospective of his drawings will include over one hundred sheets representing every phase of his career: early abstract expressionist watercolors of the 1950s, studies for light installations, portraits and landscape sketches, and pastels of sailboats from the 1980s. In addition, the exhibition will feature nearly fifty works from Flavin's personal collection of drawings, including nineteenth-century American landscapes by Hudson River School artists, Japanese drawings, and twentieth-century works by artists such as Piet Mondrian, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt.

Stanya Kahn - New Museum
Through July 01, 2012 - New York

Stanya Kahn's videos offer glimpses into alternate worlds populated by bizarre characters, mummified animals, natural forces, and primal impulses. Happy Song for You (2011), made with legendary artist Llyn Foulkes, demonstrates Kahn's unique approach to storytelling in which humor and absurdity function as central forces. Featuring an original song written and performed by Foulkes, the video is set to a carefully crafted soundtrack, a signature element of Kahn's work. Happy Song for You will be exhibited alongside a selection of ink-on-paper drawings that extend Kahn's comedic writing into the graphic practice of cartooning.

Stanya Kahn (b. 1968) lives and works in Los Angeles. Her videos were recently featured in 'Two Schools of Cool' and the California Biennial, both presented at the Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA. Her video It's Cool, I'm Good (2010) won the jury prize for short fiction at the Migrating Forms Festival in New York City in 2010 and she recently received a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship. She will have a solo show at Cornerhouse, Manchester, UK, in June 2012. This is Kahn's first New York solo museum presentation. This presentation is organized by Jenny Moore, Assistant Curator, and is part of the Museum's 'Stowaways' series -- a constellation of episodic projects and spontaneous interventions in spaces throughout the New Museum.

Tacita Dean: Five Americans - New Museum
Through July 01, 2012 - New York

This May, the New Museum will present an exhibition of works by British artist Tacita Dean -- the most substantial presentation of the artist's work in New York to date. The presentation focuses on a group of recent pieces that capture five important American artists and thinkers of the last fifty years and features Merce Cunningham, Leo Steinberg, Julie Mehretu, Claes Oldenburg, and Cy Twombly. These works are beautifully crafted portraits of each individual, opening a lens onto their artistic processes and personal memories. This installation, organized in close collaboration with Dean, provides insight into the way in which her filmmaking intersects with painting, sculpture, writing, and dance. This exhibition is part of a series of focus shows concentrating on a single project or body of work within an artist's larger practice which began last May with presentations by Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Gustav Metzger.

Klara Liden: Bodies of Society - New Museum
Through July 01, 2012 - New York

This May, the New Museum will present the first large-scale, American museum exhibition of the artist Klara Liden, featuring a selection of works in the Museum's second floor gallery. Liden's exhibition at the New Museum is part of a series of focus shows that began last May with presentations by Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Gustav Metzger.

Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models - Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
Through July 08, 2012 - New York

"Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models," a new exhibition that examines the detailed process of building model ships at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and will be on display through Sunday, July 8, 2012. The exhibition consists of dozens of artifacts including model ships, vintage toy ships, a variety of antique model kit boxes, a mock-up of a modeler's workbench showing the building of a model ship being made in progress and illustrations that demonstrate how models are constructed. Among the highlights of the exhibit are models of the Battleship New Jersey, which served during WWII, the Korean War and Vietnam, and USS Constitution, the oldest commissioned vessel afloat in the world. The model USS New Jersey measures 112" W x 25" H x 15" D and the model USS Constitution measures 57" W x 43"H x 22" D. A modeler's workbench offers a peek at the tools of the trade, while World War II nautical toys illustrate children's fascination with ships. From wartime cardboard models to ships in bottles, the exhibit highlights the dexterity, ingenuity and artistry embodied in these popular collectors' items. "Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models" is made possible through the support of the Susan and Elihu Rose Foundation and will be on display through Sunday, July 8, 2012. The exhibit is free with museum admission. For more information, visit www.intrepidmuseum.org.

Keith Haring: 1978-1982 - Brooklyn Museum
Through July 08, 2012 -

Keith Haring: 1978-1982 is the first large-scale exhibition to explore the early career of one of the best-known American artists of the twentieth century. Tracing the development of Haring's extraordinary visual vocabulary, the exhibition includes 155 works on paper, numerous experimental videos, and over 150 archival objects, including rarely seen sketchbooks, journals, exhibition flyers, posters, subway drawings, and documentary photographs.

The exhibition chronicles the period in Haring's career from his arrival in New York City through the years when he started his studio practice and began making public and political art on the city streets. Immersing himself in New York's downtown culture, he quickly became a fixture on the artistic scene, befriending other artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Kenny Scharf, as well as many of the most innovative cultural figures of the period. The critical role that these relationships played in Haring's development as a public artist and facilitator of group exhibitions and performances will also be explored. Pieces on view will include a number of very early works never before seen in public; seven video pieces, including Haring Paints Himself into a Corner (his first video piece) and Tribute to Gloria Vanderbilt; and collages created from cut-up fragments of his own writing, history textbooks, and newspapers.

Women in Aviation: World War II - Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
Through July 08, 2012 - New York

In 1910, Raymonde de Laroche of France became the first woman to earn a solo pilot's license. Just three decades after de Laroche earned her license, the world was engulfed in a terrible war. Aviation promised to play a critical role in the conflict. Seeing an opportunity to contribute their talents, female pilots lobbied their governments for a chance to serve. Women in Aviation: World War II examines the wartime contributions of these pioneering women. American women took to the skies under the auspices of the Women Airforce Service Pilots, the Civil Air Patrol and aircraft manufacturing companies such as Grumman. Female pilots ferried airplanes from base to base. They tested powerful warplanes fresh off the assembly line and flew patrol missions around the country. Behind the scenes, female engineers helped produce rugged warplanes. More than many women, female pilots challenged traditional ideas of what a woman could accomplish. At war's end, society expected women to return to their quiet lives as wives and homemakers, and most women who hoped to continue their flying careers found little opportunity. Decades passed before America's female aviators received formal recognition for their wartime service. Women in Aviation: World War II features original artifacts including flight suits and gear, uniforms, pilot log books, archival materials and photographs. Vintage film footage shows women breaking records, winning air races, and training to serve their country. The exhibition, opening on March 1st and running through July 8th, is free with general admission and will be located in the Hangar 2 Gallery.

Byzantium and Islam - Age of Transition - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 08, 2012 -

The Eastern Mediterranean, from Syria across North Africa, comprised the wealthy southern provinces of the Byzantine Empire at the start of the seventh century. By that century's end, the region was central to the emerging Islamic world. This exhibition will be the first to display the complex character of the region and its exceptional art and culture during the era of transition -- from its role as part of the Byzantine state to its evolving position in the developing Islamic world. The dialogue between established Byzantine and evolving Islamic styles and culture will be shown through images of authority, religion, and especially commerce. Iconoclasm as it emerged during that period among the Christian, Jewish, and Islamic communities of the region will be addressed.

Casting the Divine - The Rubin Museum
Through July 13, 2012 - New York

A group of 104 sculptures on long-term loan to the Rubin Museum of Art will be exhibited together for the first time in the United States. A selection of the works was previously exhibited at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, in the United Kingdom, in 1999. The collection is known as the Nyingjei Lam Collection, which means "path of compassion."

Projects 97: Mark Boulos - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through July 16, 2012 - Manhattan

Boulos's installation All that Is Solid Melts into Air (2008), comprised of two large-scale videos, presents two communities on opposite ends of the world, each locked in a struggle to control oil. Oil surrounds us on a daily basis, and yet we are scarcely aware of its source or presence; when refined into products, petroleum gives no clue as to its origin or its physical form. Boulos's installation, however, begins to make visible the mechanisms of this process of abstraction, and the political conditions that these objects conceal. In one video, Boulos shows traders in the Chicago Mercantile Exchange on the first day of the 2008 credit crisis. In the other video, Boulos presents footage of his experience living with Nigerian fishermen -- members of the militant group Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta, which opposes through violent means the exploitation of people and devastation of the environment in one of the largest oil fields in the world. The individuals in these two landscapes are connected through a desire to control petroleum, which vanishes into thin air, in the first instance through financial speculation, and in the second through corporate regulation of Nigerian mines. All that Is Solid Melts into Air provokes timely questions about the ongoing fight over natural resources, and the power of social mechanisms, such as financial derivatives, to shape the lives of individuals and communities while obfuscating their very connection to those affected. Mark Boulos (American, b. 1975) is an artist and filmmaker who lives and works in Amsterdam and London. He studied visual art at the Rijksakademie in Holland as a Fulbright Scholar, documentary filmmaking at the National Film and Television School in England, and philosophy at Swarthmore College and Deep Springs College.

Kehinde Wiley / The World Stage: Israel - The Jewish Museum
Through July 29, 2012 -

One of the most significant young artists today, Kehinde Wiley is known for vibrant, large-scale paintings of young urban men, rendered in the self-confident, empowered poses typical of classical European portrait painting.

Part of a new series exploring the global diaspora, the works in The World Stage: Israel are based on photographs the artist took of men of diverse religions and ethnicities living in Israel. The detailed decorative backgrounds are based on Jewish ceremonial art. The exhibition includes 14 paintings and a selection of textiles and papercuts chosen by the artist from The Jewish Museum's collection.

Antico: The Golden Age of Renaissance Bronzes - Frick Collection
Through July 29, 2012 - New York

Antico: The Golden Age of Renaissance Bronzes is the first monographic exhibition in the United States dedicated to Pier Jacopo Alari de Bonacolsi, known as Antico (c. 1455-1528). As sculptor to the Gonzaga courts at Mantua and in northern Italy, Antico earned his name, "the antique one," for his creation in the classical style of statuettes, reliefs, and busts that are distinguished by their opulence and beauty. Using inventive and highly refined techniques, Antico lavishly gilded, silvered, and patinated his works, elevating his bronze sculptures to the status of the ancient precious objects that were avidly collected by his Gonzaga patrons. Splendid and timeless, Antico's works represent a sophisticated court style and have always been exclusive and rare. Today fewer than fifty of his bronzes are known. Dispersed among museums in Europe and America, nearly forty of them will come together in this unprecedented presentation. The exhibition aims to shed light on the master's transformative contribution to this art form, incorporating the results of newly performed technical research to answer questions about the dating of Antico's works, his technique, and his development as an innovative artist. Jointly organized by the National Gallery of Art and The Frick Collection, the exhibition opened in the fall of 2011 in Washington, D.C., before traveling to New York City the following spring. The exhibition is curated by Eleonora Luciano, Associate Curator of Sculpture at the National Gallery of Art, in collaboration with Denise Allen, Curator at The Frick Collection. The accompanying catalogue is written by an international team of scholars including Eleonora Luciano, Denise Allen, and Claudia Kryza-Gersch, Curator of Italian Sculpture at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. It will be the first independent monograph in English to focus on the artist and the first comprehensive presentation of his works in color.

The Printed Image in China, 8th-21st Century - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 29, 2012 -

China invented both paper and printing and this exhibition presents an outstanding survey of the art of Chinese printing from the time of its inception around the early eighth century through its burgeoning as an artistic medium during the seventeenth century and its continued vitality as a medium for both popular culture and political commentary during the twentieth century. The exhibition will consist of approximately 136 prints drawn from the encyclopedic holdings of the British Museum.

Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through July 30, 2012 - Manhattan

Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream is an exploration of new architectural possibilities for cities and suburbs in the aftermath of the recent foreclosure crisis. During summer 2011, five interdisciplinary teams of architects, urban planners, ecologists, engineers, and landscape designers worked in public workshops at MoMA PS1 to envision new housing and transportation infrastructures that could catalyze urban transformation, particularly in the country's suburbs. Responding to The Buell Hypothesis, a research report prepared by the Buell Center at Columbia University, teams -- lead by MOS, Visible Weather, Studio Gang, WORKac, and Zago Architecture -- focused on a specific location within one of five "megaregions" across the country to come up with inventive solutions for the future of American suburbs. This installation presents the proposals developed during the architects-in-residence program, including a wide array of models, renderings, animations, and analytical materials.

The Dawn of Egyptian Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 05, 2012 -

During the Predynastic and Early Dynastic Periods (ca. 4000-2650 B.C.), people living in the Nile Valley began recording their beliefs through paintings, sculptures, and reliefs made for their shrines and tombs. These works of art capture the evolving world view of these early Egyptians. Images of people, animals, and landscapes, some of which give rise to hieroglyphs, include forms and iconography that remained in use throughout the art of Pharaonic Egypt. This exhibition brings together some 175 objects gathered from the Metropolitan Museum's important collection of early art and from the collections of twelve other museums in the U.S. and Europe to illustrate the origins and early development of ancient Egyptian art.

Revolutionary Ink: The Paintings of Wu Guanzhong - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 05, 2012 - New York

Wu Guanzhong (1919-2010) stands as one of the most important artists of 20th-century China. He was highly prolific both in oil and ink painting and is well known for his eloquent writings on art and creativity. For this exhibition, over 50 paintings spanning the mid-1970s to 2004 have been selected that focus on his best works in the medium of ink. Revolutionary Ink: The Paintings of Wu Guanzhong is organized by Asia Society in collaboration with the Shanghai Art Museum, to which the artist gave many of his works. The exhibition traces the development of Wu's work, and emphasizes his radical individual approach to the medium of ink painting and how it went against the trend at a time when most artists were looking to Western art as a model. The inclusion of a Chinese hanging scroll painting from the 15th century illustrates the long tradition of ink painting in China. The exhibition shows Wu's legacy as a modern master who pushes the boundaries of our understanding of how a traditional medium of ink can be made new for a new century. The exhibition is curated by Melissa Chiu of Asia Society and Lu Huan of Shanghai Art Museum. It is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with an essay by leading Chinese and American scholars as well as essays by the artist translated for the first time into English. Revolutionary Ink: The Paintings of Wu Guanzhong is organized by Asia Society Museum and the Shanghai Art Museum, one of China's leading cultural institutions. The museum has been the main venue of the international Shanghai Biennale exhibition since 1996 and draws global attention to a city that has become one of the country's most important art centers.

9 Scripts from a Nation at War - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 06, 2012 - Manhattan

9 Scripts from a Nation at War (2007), a 10-channel video installation recently acquired by MoMA, marks the first work for which artists Andrea Geyer, Sharon Hayes, Ashley Hunt, Katya Sander, and David Thorne have collaborated. The work responds to knowledge production and communication in the context of the Iraq war since the initial invasion by U.S. military forces in March 2003. The 10 videos comprising the large-scale, spatial installation cast inquiry into the position of the individual amidst roles constructed by war. Each video stages the speaking of a script from the following perspectives: citizen, blogger, correspondent, veteran, student, actor, interviewer, lawyer, detainee, and source. The scripts are enacted by both actors and non-actors, some speaking their own words, some reciting the words of others. Displayed as projections and seated viewing stations in a circuitous, non-narrative structure, the performative videos create a charged environment questioning the implications of war on individual and collective subjectivity.

Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 12, 2012 - Upper West Side

Beyond Planet Earth launches visitors into the exciting future of space exploration as it boldly speculates on humanity's next steps in our solar system and beyond. The exhibition features a full-sized re-creation of a lunar habitat, a model of an elevator reaching up into space, a walk-through diorama of the Martian surface, and challenging interactive simulations. See authentic equipment and models of historic spacecraft from select voyages in the past. Learn about robotic missions that are currently headed deeper and deeper into our own solar system, and what they might reveal. Understand why geologists are so interested in specimens from moons and other planets and what we can learn from them. And explore some possible spectacular missions of the future: mining the Moon, landing on and deflecting a potentially deadly asteroid, or traveling to Mars - and perhaps even establishing colonies there. Is it possible within our lifetime? Will we discover evidence of life, past or present, on another planet? Find out what experts think the future will hold for us beyond planet Earth. Gallery 3, third floor

Newspaper Fiction: The New York Journalism of Djuna Barnes - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 19, 2012 -

Newspaper Fiction: The New York Journalism of Djuna Barnes, 1913-1919 is an exploration of the early journalistic career of American writer and women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes (1892-1982). Though best known for her modernist novels and plays, including Nightwood (1936) and The Antiphon (1958), Barnes spent the period between 1913 and her departure for Europe in 1921 living in New York's Greenwich Village and working as a writer and illustrator for publications including the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Vanity Fair. The product of an unconventional household, she developed an outsider's perspective on "normal" life that served her as an artist, and a liberal sexuality that fit in perfectly with the bohemian lifestyle of Greenwich Village and, later, the lesbian expatriate community in Paris. She used journalism as a means to understand New York City's people and places, and as an excuse to push boundaries and explore society's margins. On view will be forty-five objects, including documentary photographs, drawings, works on paper, and Barnes's stories in newsprint, including eight illustrations she composed to accompany her newspaper columns. Her work suggests a proto-feminist sensibility, emphasizing politics as something experienced on an individual, emotional level.

Gold, Jasper, and Carnelian: Johann Christian Neuber at the Saxon Court - Frick Collection
Through August 19, 2012 - New York

Johann Christian Neuber was one of Dresden's most famous goldsmiths. Sometime before 1775 he was named court jeweler to Friedrich Augustus III, elector of Saxony, and in 1785 he was appointed Curator of the Grunes Gewolbe (Green Vault), the magnificent royal collection of Augustus the Strong, the founder of the Meissen Porcelain Manufactory. For more than thirty years, Neuber created small gold boxes, chatelaines, and watchcases decorated with local semiprecious stones such as agate, jasper, and carnelian. He fashioned enchanting landscapes, complex floral designs, and geometric patterns with tiny cut stones, often incorporating Meissen porcelain plaques, cameos, and miniatures. These one-of-a-kind objects, which reflect the Saxon court's interest in both luxury items and the natural sciences, remain prized treasures today, but have never before been shown together in a monographic exhibition.

The exhibition aims to shed light on the master's transformative contribution to this art form, incorporating the results of newly performed technical research to answer questions about the dating of Antico's works, his technique, and his development as an innovative artist. Jointly organized by the National Gallery of Art and The Frick Collection, the exhibition opened in the fall of 2011 in Washington, D.C., before traveling to New York City the following spring. The exhibition is curated by Eleonora Luciano, Associate Curator of Sculpture at the National Gallery of Art, in collaboration with Denise Allen, Curator at The Frick Collection. The accompanying catalogue is written by an international team of scholars including Eleonora Luciano, Denise Allen, and Claudia Kryza-Gersch, Curator of Italian Sculpture at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. It will be the first independent monograph in English to focus on the artist and the first comprehensive presentation of his works in color.

Spies in the House of Art - Photography, Film, and Video - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 26, 2012 -

Artists are the secret constituency of museums, inspired and challenged not only by the objects and collections they display but also by the spaces in which they are shown and the authority they represent. Most artists aspire to see their works in museums, even if they joke among themselves about how museums are mausoleums, places where art goes to die. In telling stories about how and why art gets made, museums provide a ready-made foil for artists to react against and clarify their own positions.

This selection of photography, film, and video from the permanent collection surveys the various ways museums inspire the making of works of art. A museum can be the setting for a new work or provide the raw material for creations that build upon a previous aesthetic experience. The camera can highlight the estrangement of objects from their original functions, unlock from a straitlaced decorousness of display the desires -- libidinal or otherwise -- that engendered the objects in the first place, or make visible the imaginative projection that underlies much looking at art. At a time when the automatic reflex of a technologically harried and distracted museum visitor may be to point and shoot, capture and move on, these works suggest the benefit of stepping back, reflecting, and lingering.

In an unprecedented commingling of old and new works, Andrea Fraser's video Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk (1989) will be exhibited alongside paintings by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Alexandre Cabanel, and Franz Xaver Winterhalter in Gallery 809 within the Galleries of Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art, around the corner from the main installation. A complementary installation of a dozen photographs from the medium's beginnings to the early 1970s will be on view through May 6 in Gallery 850.

Playing House - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 26, 2012 -

Playing House is the first in a series of installations that aim to engage visitors with the Brooklyn Museum's period rooms. Artists Betty Woodman, Anne Chu, Ann Agee, and Mary Lucier have been invited to place site-specific artwork in eight of the Museum's historic rooms, which have been interpreted by curators over the years to illustrate how Americans of various times, economic levels, and locations lived. The artists were asked to consider these factors when developing their ideas. The project originated with Woodman's observation that although being an artist means confronting the art of the past, no one can enter the past -- except through "make believe," or "playing house," by which the past can be appropriated.

Chu created magical birds and flowers out of textiles, feathers, paper, and metal, unexpectedly bringing nature and the outside world into the rooms. Lucier, who is descended from Dutch and Huguenot settlers, created videos that evoke memories of place and where we come from. Agee transformed the strict social order and luxury of the Milligan rooms into an artisan's workshop, and Woodman created table settings and "carpets" incorporating painting and ceramics. Playing House occupies the Cupola House Dining Room, the Russell Parlor, the Cane Acres Plantation Dining Room, the Worsham-Rockefeller Moorish Smoking Room, the Schenck Houses, the Weil-Worgelt Study, and the Milligan Parlor and Library. The installation is organized by Barry R. Harwood, Curator of Decorative Arts, and Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum.

Sanford Biggers and Jennifer Zackin: a small world... - The Jewish Museum
Through August 26, 2012 -

In the collaborative video a small world..., artists Sanford Biggers and Jennifer Zackin juxtapose home movies of their families -- one African American and one Jewish American --- to explore the intersections of middle-class life across racial lines. Originally recorded in silent super-8 film, the video shows the artists as children growing up in New York and Los Angeles in the 1970s. Typical family events and holidays -- birthdays, Hanukkah, Christmas, barbecues, family trips to Disneyland, playtime in the backyard -- are shown simultaneously, drawing attention to similarities of class while recognizing differences of ethnicity.

The Parade: Nathalie Djurberg with Music by Hans Berg - New Museum
Through August 26, 2012 - New York

"The Parade: Nathalie Djurberg with Music by Hans Berg" is Djurberg's most ambitious multimedia installation to date. Originally organized by the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Djurberg will adapt this spectacular installation for the New Museum's 'Studio 231' space. In the hands of Swedish artist Nathalie Djurberg, animation becomes a medium for transgressive and nightmarish allegories of desire and malcontent. Since 2001, she has honed a distinctive style of filmmaking, using the pliability of clay to dramatize our most primal urges -- jealousy, revenge, greed, submission, and gluttony. Set to music and sound effects by her collaborator, Hans Berg, Djurberg's videos plumb the dark recesses of the mind, drawing sometimes disturbing connections between human psychology and animal behavior. Increasingly, the artists' interdisciplinary collaborations have blurred the cinematic, the sculptural, and the performative in immersive environments that pair moving images and musical compositions with related set pieces. For her new work, The Parade (2011), Djurberg has created five captivating animations and an unnerving menagerie of more than eighty freestanding bird sculptures. Drawing on avian physiology, rituals of mating and territorial display, and the social phenomenon of flocking, she has assembled a fantastical procession of species all fashioned from modest materials such as clay, wire, and painted canvas. These hybrid, sometimes monstrous forms speak to the artist's recurring interest in physical and psychological transformation, as well as pageantry, perversion, and abjection. In the accompanying claymation videos, humans and animals alike act out upsetting scenarios of torture, humiliation, and masquerade, further mining the interplay of brutality and guilt at the heart of Djurberg's work. Berg's eerie film scores -- composed of elements both found and invented -- suffuse the entire installation, merging to form a unified soundscape. With these films, both artists have begun to conceive narrative in spatial terms as aspects of character, setting, sound, and action migrate from one story to the next across the exhibition space. Born in Lysekil, Sweden, in 1978, Nathalie Djurberg received her MFA from Malm� Art Academy in 2002, and since that time she has exhibited widely in solo and group exhibitions around the world. Most notably, in 2009 she presented her installation The Experiment in the exhibition "Making Worlds" at the 53rd Venice Biennale, for which she was awarded the prestigious Silver Lion for Promising Young Artist. In 2008, Djurberg participated in the New Museum's "After Nature" exhibition curated by Massimiliano Gioni. She currently lives and works in Berlin with Hans Berg. Hans Berg was born in Rattvik, Sweden, in 1978. He is a Berlin-based electronic music producer and self-taught musician. He began playing the drums in punk and rock bands at the age of fourteen. By fifteen, Berg started creating electronic music -- which he has made ever since -- when he purchased his first synthesizer and sampler. Berg and Djurberg met in Berlin in 2004. Since then, he has composed the music for all of her films and installations. The exhibition is curated by Eric Crosby and Dean Otto for the Walker Art Center and organized at the New Museum by Gary Carrion-Murayari, Curator.

Heinrich Kuehn and His American Circle: Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen - Neue Galerie
Through August 27, 2012 - New York

The Neue Galerie New York will present "Heinrich Kuehn and His American Circle: Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen," an exhibition focusing on the luminous work of this important Austrian photographer. The organizing curator for the project is Dr. Monika Faber, a distinguished scholar of photography. "Heinrich Kuehn and His American Circle" aims to situate Kuehn with regard to both the Viennese avant-garde and the international development of photography as an art form. It explores the close friendship among Kuehn and major American photographers Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen. The early pictorial work of photographer Heinrich Kuehn (1866-1944) was highly influential in turn-of-the-century circles; his work was exhibited at the Vienna Secession. Gradually, Kuehn incorporated the influence of his peers, and moved in the direction of Modernist photography. He was also among the first important photographers to create color images. Photographic prints and autochromes by Kuehn will be included in the exhibition.

Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 27, 2012 - Manhattan

Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language is a group exhibition that brings together 12 contemporary artists and artists' groups working in all mediums including painting, sculpture, film, video, audio, and design, all of whom concentrate on the material qualities of language -- visual, aural, and beyond. The work that these artists create belongs to a distinguished history of poem/objects, and concrete language experiments that dates to the beginnings of modernism, and includes both the Dada and Futurist moments as well as the recrudescence of Neo-Dada in the late 1950s, and international literary movements like concrete and sound poetry in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Like visual artists who experimented with abstract forms with the goal of arriving at a non-metaphoric artwork that was itself and nothing else, artists working with words in the late 1950s and 1960s used language as a medium; letters, words, and texts were dissected, displayed as objects, or arranged so that form and content were combined. The works in Ecstatic Alphabets represent a radical updating of the possibilities inherent in the relationship between art and language. In this exhibition, the letter, the word and the phrase are seen and experienced, and not necessarily read. Physicalized, transcribed into sounds, symbols, pictures or patterns, scrambled, or negated, language is freed from the page as well as from its received meanings, received forms, and, in some cases, the duties of communication altogether. Working with language has also created an opportunity for artists to move more freely among disciplines, and this exhibition includes work in a range of mediums by artists who are also poets, writers, performers, and graphic designers. Like earlier experiments in this vein, many of these recent works have an abiding connection to poetry, which runs like a subtheme through the exhibition, adding the ecstatic element to each works' alphabetic plainness. The exhibition is divided into two sections, with the first featuring an abbreviated timeline of language in modern art culled primarily from drawings, sculptures, prints, books, and sound works from MoMA's collection. Artists in this historical section of the exhibition include: Carl Andre, Marcel Broodthaers, Henri Chopin, Marcel Duchamp, Ian Hamilton Finlay, John Giorno, Kitasono Katue, Ferdinand Kriwet, Liliane Lijn, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Bruce Nauman, Lawrence Weiner, and others. Artists in the contemporary section of the exhibition include: Ei Arakawa/Nikolas Gambaroff, Tauba Auerbach, Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey), Trisha Donnelly, Shannon Ebner, Paul Elliman, Experimental Jetset, Sharon Hayes, Karl Holmqvist, Paulina Olowska, Adam Pendleton, and Nora Schultz. The exhibition is accompanied by a publication designed and produced by Dexter Sinister.

Gustav Klimt: 150th Anniversary Celebration - Neue Galerie
Through August 27, 2012 - New York

Throughout 2012, Austria is celebrating the 150th birthday of Gustav Klimt with exhibitions devoted to his work. Several Viennese museums, including the Albertina, the Belvedere, the Kunsthistorisches, the Leopold, and the Wien Museum, are honoring different aspects of Klimt�s extraordinary legacy. The Neue Galerie is joining in these celebrations with a special summer 2012 installation of his work.

Weegee: Murder Is My Business - International Center of Photography
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

For an intense decade between 1935 and 1946, Weegee (1899-1968) was one of the most relentlessly inventive figures in American photography. His graphically dramatic and often lurid photographs of New York crimes and news events set the standard for what has become known as tabloid journalism. Freelancing for a variety of New York newspapers and photo agencies, and later working as a stringer for the short-lived liberal daily PM (1940-48), Weegee established a way of combining photographs and texts that was distinctly different from that promoted by other picture magazines, such as LIFE. Utilizing other distribution venues, Weegee also wrote extensively (including his autobiographical Naked City, published in 1945) and organized his own exhibitions at the Photo League. This exhibition draws upon the extensive Weegee Archive at ICP and includes environmental recreations of Weegee's apartment and exhibitions. The exhibition is organized by ICP Chief Curator Brian Wallis.

BE SURE! BE SAFE! GET VACCINATED! Smallpox, Vaccination and Civil Liberties in New York - New-York Historical Society
Through September 02, 2012 - Upper West Side

The eradication of smallpox, variola major, from the world is one of the great triumphs of modern medicine. For centuries, this highly contagious, disfiguring lethal disease swept through communities, often killing nearly a quarter of its victims and leaving many of the rest blind and deeply scarred. There is still not any known cure for the disease, but the last naturally occurring case of smallpox in the world appeared in 1977. "Get Vaccinated!" -- part of a slogan from an incredibly successful 1947 campaign requesting voluntary vaccination (when five million New Yorkers were vaccinated in two weeks) -- traces the history of smallpox and efforts to manage it in the crowded environs of the nation's largest city. The exhibition begins with the use of inoculation (the introduction of matter from a pustule on the body of smallpox sufferer), in the eighteenth century, and George Washington's dramatic decision to inoculate his troops during the Revolutionary War, amid rumors that the British were intentionally infecting rebel populations. Themes emphasized in Get Vaccinated! include the history of vaccination itself, the painful conflict between the need to manage disease in an urban environment and the rights of individuals to resist government interference in their private lives, the growing effectiveness of public relations campaigns in promoting public health initiatives, bioterrorism and the political and economic impact of all epidemics in the city, including cholera, typhus, yellow fever, and AIDS.

Beer Here: Brewing New York's History - New-York Historical Society
Through September 02, 2012 - Upper West Side

To consider the fascinating yet largely anonymous legacy of beer brewing in New York City, the New-York Historical Society presents Beer Here: Brewing New York's History, on display from May 25, 2012 to September 2, 2012. This exhibit will survey the social, economic, political, and technological history of the production and consumption of beer, ale, and porter in the city from the seventeenth century to the present. In the past three decades, New York City has become an important center of craft and home beer brewing. While this phenomenon began only after President Jimmy Carter signed into law an act that legalized home-brewing, the growth of New York's present beer industry also marks the resurgence of a long-standing tradition known to few outside the world of beer aficionados. Beer has been brewed in New York City and State since the days of its earliest European settlement, when it was a vital source of nourishment and tax revenues. Brewing continued locally and statewide throughout the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and for much of the nineteenth century New York State was home to one of the country's largest brewing industries. Early nineteenth-century development of New York State's hop farming industry was vital to this growth, and from the 1840s through the 1880s the state was the largest producer of hops in the United States. Exhibit sections will explore such topics as: the nutritional properties of colonial beer and early New York brewers in the age of revolution; infrastructure innovations and the importance of access to clean water; large-scale brewing in nineteenth-century New York and the influence of immigration; the influence of temperance and impact of prohibition; bottling, canning, refrigeration and other technological advances; and the state of the city's breweries in the age of mass production. Featured artifacts and documents will include: a 1779 account book from a New York City brewer who sold beer and ale to both the British and patriot sides; sections of early nineteenth-century wooden pipes from one of the city's first water systems; a bronze medal that commemorates an 1855 New York State temperance law; beer trays from a variety of late nineteenth-century brewers; sign from the campaign to repeal prohibition; and a selection of advertisements from Piels, Rheingold and Schaefer, beloved hometown brewers. The exhibit concludes with a small beer hall that will feature a selection of favorite New York City and State artisanal beers. The beer hall hours are: Tuesday-Thursday and Saturdays: 2pm-6pm; Fridays: 2pm-8pm; Sundays: 2pm-5pm.

Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 03, 2012 - Manhattan

This exhibition is the U.S. premiere of Taryn Simon's (b. 1975, New York) photographic project A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII. The work was produced over a four-year period (2008-11), during which the artist travelled around the world researching and documenting bloodlines and their related stories. In each of the 18 "chapters" that make up the work, external forces of territory, power, circumstance, or religion collide with the internal forces of psychological and physical inheritance. The subjects Simon documents include victims of genocide in Bosnia, test rabbits infected with a lethal disease in Australia, the first woman to hijack an aircraft, and the living dead in India. Her collection is at once cohesive and arbitrary, mapping the relationships among chance, blood, and other components of fate. Simon's project is divided into 18 chapters, nine of which will be presented at MoMA. Each chapter is comprised of three segments: one of a large portrait series depicting bloodline members (portrait panel); a second featuring text (annotation panel); and a third containing photographic evidence (footnote panel). A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII exploits photography's capacity to at once probe complex narratives in contemporary politics and organize this material according to classification processes characteristic of the archive, a system that connects identity, lineage, history, and memory.

Bellini, Titian, and Lotto North Italian Paintings from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 03, 2012 -

The Accademia Carrara, Bergamo, is a jewel among Italian museums and a haven for art lovers. Founded at the end of the eighteenth century by Count Giacomo Carrara and housed in a beautiful Neoclassical building, it contains a range of masterpieces dating from the fourteenth to the nineteenth century. At its core is a group of outstanding pictures from the Renaissance. Because of closure for restoration, it has been possible for the museum to lend to The Metropolitan Museum of Art fifteen masterpieces by Venetian and north Italian painters of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, including works by Bellini, Titian, and Lorenzo Lotto.

Naked before the Camera - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 09, 2012 -

Since the beginning of art and in every medium, depicting the human body has been among the artist's greatest challenges and supreme achievements, as can so easily be seen by Museum visitors walking through the galleries of Greek and Roman statuary, African and Oceanic art, Old Master paintings, or Indian sculpture. Tapping veins of mythology, carnal desire, hero worship, and aesthetic pleasure, depictions of the nude have also triggered impassioned discussions of sin and sexuality, cultural identity, and canons of beauty. Controversies are often aroused even more intensely when the artist's chosen medium is photography, with its accuracy and specificity -- when a real person stood naked before the camera -- rather than traditional media where more generalized and idealized forms prevail. In the medium's early days -- particularly in France, where Victorian notions of propriety held less sway than in England and America, and where life drawing was a central part of artistic training -- photographs proved to be a cheap and easy substitute for the live model. While serving painters and sculptors, many nineteenth-century photographic nudes were also intended as works of art in their own right. Still others bore the title "artist's study" merely to evade government censors and legitimize images that were, in fact, more likely intended to stir a gentleman's loins than to enhance his aesthetic endeavors. Outside the realms of art and erotica, photographic nudes were made to aid the study of anatomy, movement, forensics, and ethnography.

In twentieth-century art, the body became a vehicle for surreal and modernist manipulation and for intimate odes to beauty or poems to a muse. Beginning with the sexual revolution of the 1960s, nudity and its representation took on new meanings -- as declarations of freedom from societal strictures, as assertions of individual identity, as explorations of sexuality and gender roles, and as responses to AIDS. Naked before the Camera surveys the history of this subject and examines some of the motivations and meanings that underlie its expression.

Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently - New Museum
Through September 09, 2012 - New York

"Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently" is a multipart project that explores the idea of sexual and gender "difference" after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics. Through an exhibition, series of events, and an opening symposium, the project seeks to invigorate discussion around a queer "We" that looks beyond tolerance or assimilation toward a concept of equality that provides for greater personal freedom. The project draws from Motta's evolving database documentary wewhofeeldifferently.info, which proposes "difference" as a profound mode of possibility for both solidarity and self-determination.

Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 - The Jewish Museum
Through September 23, 2012 -

This exhibition features key works in various media by Edouard Vuillard, the twentieth-century master whose unique blend of tradition and modernity evokes the refined and sophisticated society of his patrons, many of whom were Jewish.

Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York - New-York Historical Society
Through September 23, 2012 - Upper West Side

The New-York Historical Society will present Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York, an exhibition highlighting the histories of 150 notable examples of silver from its collection. Made across the span of four centuries, the objects in the exhibition tell a diversity of stories: many speak to individual accomplishment and family pride, while a few have unsettling ties or backgrounds. The silver, ranging from simple spoons to extravagant trophies, culled from a trove of over 3,000 objects, includes powerful eyewitness artifacts linked to significant moments in the history of New York and the United States.

Electric Currents, 1900-1940 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 30, 2012 - Manhattan

Electricity -- a source of clean, efficient power and brilliant, reliable light -- epitomized the very spirit of modernism in the early 20th century. After decades of research and competitive experimentation following the development of the first arc lamps and incandescent filament bulbs in the mid-19th century, electricity began to transform every aspect of modern life. Electric light -- first in city streets and then in homes -- brought a revolutionary innovation to daily existence, literally redefining day and night. This installation features a dozen posters from MoMA's collection used in this period to promote electricity, which offered staggering possibilities for progress but was not universally welcomed. In creating graphics for industry leaders like AEG and Bosch, modern designers were inspired by the beauty of the bulb itself and the splendor of electric light, which are both rendered with exquisite power in Jacques Nathan-Garamond's poster of c. 1938, which pulsates in 2-D. The installation highlights a selection of Lester Beall's equally vibrant posters for the Rural Electrification Administration, which used bold, patriotic graphics to foster public awareness of the benefits of electricity in America's homes and farms during the Great Depression.

The Rylands Haggadah Medieval Jewish Art in Context - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 30, 2012 -

From the calling of Moses to the crossing of the Red Sea, the drama of the ancient Israelites' exodus from Egypt is presented in The Rylands Haggadah. This is the third in a series of installations focusing on one masterwork of Hebrew manuscript illumination from a national or international collection. This spring, the featured work comes from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester, England. Each month, the Haggadah will be open to a different page, affording visitors the exceptional opportunity to follow the artist's telling of the Exodus story. Works of art from the Museum's own collection, made for Christian use but depicting the saga of the Hebrew people, will suggest the larger, medieval context of biblical storytelling in which the Haggadah was created. The previous installations featured the Washington Haggadah (on view April 5-July 4, 2011) and Lisbon's Hebrew Bible (on view November 22, 2011-January 16, 2012).

Filming the Camps: John Ford, Samuel Fuller, George Stevens: From Hollywood to Nuremberg - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through October 14, 2012 - New York

Hollywood directors John Ford, George Stevens, and Samuel Fuller entertained audiences with American cinema classics like The Grapes of Wrath, Shane, and The Big Red One. But their most important contribution to history was their work in the U.S. Armed Forces and Secret Services, filming the realities of war and the liberation of Nazi concentration camps. Their documentation provides an essential visual record of WWII. Filming the Camps presents rare footage of the liberation of Dachau with detailed directors' notes, narratives describing burials at Falkenau, and the documentary produced as evidence at the Nuremberg trials, among other historic material. Now, for the first time in the U.S., this material is being made available to a general audience.

Modernist Art from India - Approaching Abstraction - The Rubin Museum
Through October 16, 2012 - New York

Approaching Abstraction is the second exhibition of a three-part series, titled Modernist Art from India, that examines art from post-independence and post-Partition India. Building on the explorations between abstraction and figuration begun in The Body Unbound, the exhibition distinguishes abstraction in modernist Indian art from abstraction in Euro-American modernism and shows the independent trajectory of abstraction in post-Independence India.

Tomas Saraceno on the Roof: Cloud City - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through November 04, 2012 -

Artist Tomas Saraceno (born in Tucuman, Argentina, in 1973) will create a constellation of large, interconnected modules constructed with transparent and reflective materials for the Museum's Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. Visitors may enter and walk through these habitat-like, modular structures grouped in a nonlinear configuration. Over the past decade, Saraceno has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivity that merge art, architecture, and science. The interdisciplinary project "Cloud Cities/Air Port City" is rooted in the artist's investigation of expanding the ways in which we inhabit and experience our environment.

Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 06, 2013 - Upper West Side

The perpetually dark deep ocean comprises the vast majority of the planet's habitable environments where approximately 90 percent of the organisms are bioluminescent and provide the only source of light. Many of these environments are threatened habitats where organisms are in danger of disappearing, some before they have been discovered and studied. Creatures of Light introduces visitors to the astonishing variety of bioluminescent creatures; explores the different ways in which organisms glow, as well as explains the physics and chemistry of natural light; reveals how the ability to glow can be advantageous; and considers how scientists study -- and use -- bioluminescence. Visitors enter the exhibition through a forest of bioluminescent mushrooms surrounding a large-scale mushroom at the center. One section evokes a New England meadow on a summer night and highlights how fireflies use patterns of flashing light to communicate and attract mates; another invites visitors to peer into Waitomo Cave of New Zealand and learn how glowworms attract prey. The exhibition includes live flashlight fish that harbor bioluminescent bacteria. Creatures of Light also features an interactive environment that introduces visitors to the brilliant light displays of Mosquito Bay in Vieques, Puerto Rico, where high concentrations of microscopic dinoflagellates, a type of plankton, create a glowing, luminescent halo around anything that moves through the bay; and a large interactive image of the Bloody Bay coral wall in the Cayman Islands. A "deep sea theater" reveals the amazing diversity of living light that marine biologists have captured on camera including anglerfishes waving bioluminescent "lures" to attract prey and jellyfishes that light up like a flashing pinwheel when threatened.

Designing Nature - The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 13, 2013 -

"Rinpa" is a modern term that refers to a distinctive style of Japanese pictorial and applied arts that arose in the early seventeenth century and has continued through modern times. Literally meaning "school of Korin," Rinpa derives its name from Ogata Korin (1658-1716), a celebrated painter from Kyoto. It embraces art marked by a bold, graphic abbreviation of natural motifs, frequent reference to traditional court literature and poetry, the lavish use of expensive mineral and metallic pigments, incorporation of calligraphy into painting compositions, and innovative experimentation with new brush techniques.

The exhibition will feature more than one hundred brilliantly executed works of art created in Japan by the Rinpa-school artists. It will be held in two rotations, the first opening on May 26, 2012; the second on September 12, 2012. Highlighting the school's most prominent proponents, this two-part presentation will trace the development of the Rinpa aesthetic and will demonstrate how its style continued to influence artists throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Comprising more than fifty works from the Museum's own holdings supplemented by forty-five loans from public and private collections on the east coast, the exhibition will include many masters' renowned works in a variety of media: painting, textiles, lacquerware, and ceramics.

Born Out of Necessity - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 28, 2013 - Manhattan

Showcasing objects that adhere to the traditional view of design as a tool for problem-solving, Born out of Necessity offers close examination of the problems themselves -- whether urgent, foreseen, or imagined. From objects that respond to pressing needs in developing countries to new solutions that are tailored to the urban environment, the exhibition examines how design intervenes across a range of experiences, including medical emergencies and natural disasters. Other objects demonstrate how products created to address specific challenges for people with disabilities can provide solutions that improve everyone's life. Drawing on the narrative power of design, Born out of Necessity addresses a host of complex cultural developments, such as the need to incorporate environmental responsibility in everyday life, our attempts to marry ancient religious beliefs with contemporary mores, and the desire to anticipate and prevent technological and ecological quagmires.

The Shaping of New Visions: Photography, Film, Photobook - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 29, 2013 - Manhattan

This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography's role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements -- with a special emphasis on the medium's relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and Post-Conceptual art -- and in the development of contemporary artistic practices. The shaping of what came to be known as "New Vision" photography bore the obvious influence of "lens-based" and "time-based" works. El Lissitzky best summarized its ethos: "The new world will not need little pictures," he wrote in The Conquest of Art (1922). "If it needs a mirror, it has the photograph and the cinema." Bringing together over 250 works from MoMA's collection, the exhibition features major projects by Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Germaine Krull, Gerhard Ruhm, Helen Levitt, Daido Moriyama, Robert Heinecken, Ed Ruscha, Martha Rosler, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip-Lorca DiCorcia, and Walid Raad, among others. Photographic history is presented as a multivalent history of distinct "new visions," rooted in unconventional and innovative exercises that range from photograms and photomontages to experimental films and photobooks.

Aesthetic Ambitions: Edward Lycett and Brooklyn's Faience Manufacturing Company - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 16, 2013 -

This exhibition highlights the nearly fifty-year career of ceramicist Edward Lycett (American, 1833-1910), creative director of the Faience Manufacturing Company from 1884 to 1890. The range of works illustrates Lycett's talent and adaptability to stylistic changes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as his vision for Faience, a company based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, that earned acclaim for producing ornamental wares that introduced a new standard of excellence in American ceramics. These bold and eclectic pieces synthesized Japanese, Chinese, and Islamic influences characteristic of the Aesthetic movement and were sold in the United States' foremost art ware emporiums, including Tiffany & Company. Among the ceramics on view are 39 Faience pieces, including a number of large-scale vases. Also on view are Lycett's formula books, family photographs, and other ephemera; rare examples of ceramic works by his three sons; and other Brooklyn-made ceramics from the Museum�s collection.

Contemporary Art from the Collection - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 17, 2014 - Manhattan

Reinstalled to continue the historical sequence found on MoMA's fifth (1880-1940) and fourth (1940-1980) floors, the galleries on the second floor will begin with art of the early 1980s and extend to the present moment, interweaving works in all mediums. Individual galleries will focus on particular topics, ranging from specific locales that nourished influential groups of artists to key strategies shared by diverse practitioners of the same generation. Others will display a single significant installation or artist's project. Like the fifth- and fourth-floor galleries, the second-floor galleries will be periodically reinstalled to reflect the depth and richness of the Museum's collection, and to allow for varying approaches to the wide variety of art produced during the last 30 years. Featured artists include Ashley Bickerton, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring, Martin Kippenberger, Steve McQueen, Senga Nengudi, Doris Salcedo, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Rosemarie Trockel.


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