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Things to do this week in NYC Sep 24-Oct 1: Cultural Arts
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September 24, 2011 - by CG Directory Editor

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American Museum of Natural History Photos American Museum of Natural History· A museum for the 21st century, with a rich and storied past ...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Metropolitan Opera· A vibrant home for the most creative and talented artists fr...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum· Frank Lloyd Wright's masterpiece of modern architecture is h...

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Dance, art galleries, museums, lectures -- you name it, there are plenty of things to do in NYC. From the New York City Ballet, to Alvin Ailey, from performances at the Metropolitan Opera, to live music at Madison Square Garden, New York has it all. Here is a selection of what's going on in New York this week.

What Matters Now? Exhibition - Aperture Foundation
Through September 24, 2011 - New York

The exhibition in progress What Matters Now? Proposals for a New Front Page will combine the crowd sourcing of images and ideas with the curatorial engagement of six visual image specialists. Over two weeks, blank walls will be filled with proposals for the contents of a 'New Front Page' in a post-9/11, globalized world.

New York Television Festival - Tribeca Cinemas
Through September 24, 2011 - New York

The New York Television Festival is a week-long celebration featuring screenings of the best independently-produced content, panels and talkbacks with industry thought leaders and creative luminaries and red-carpet premieres of the stars and creatives behind the seasons' most anticipated new network and cable shows.

Jonah Hill (Allen Gregory), Jason Sudeikis (SNL), Marc Maron (WTF), Damon Lindelof (Lost), and Phil Rosenthal (Everybody Loves Raymond) headline the 2011 Festival. For a list of scheduled events and tickets go to: http://nytvf.com/2011_boxoffice.htm

Apollo - New York City Ballet
September 24, 2011 -

Balanchine regarded Apollo as his artistic coming of age. He said that through the creation of this work, he learned he could "dare not use all my ideas, that I too, could eliminate. . . to the one possibility that is inevitable." The ballet depicts Apollo, the young god of music, who is visited and instructed by three Muses, who were also children of Zeus and thus his half-sisters: Calliope, Muse of poetry, whose symbol is a tablet; Polyhymnia, Muse of mime, whose symbol is a mask that represents the power of gesture; and Terpsichore, Muse of dance and song, whose symbol is a lyre. Stravinsky, who possessed a strong interest in Greek mythology, conceived of and composed the score as a ballet. It was with this work, his second ballet set to the music of Stravinsky, that Balanchine, at age 24, achieved international recognition and began his lifelong partnership with the composer. Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), born in Russia, is acknowledged as one of the great composers of the twentieth century. His work encompassed styles as diverse as Romanticism, Neoclassicism and Serialism. His ballets for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes included The Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Apollo. His music has been used in over thirty ballets originating with New York City Ballet from 1948 through 1987, including Danses Concertantes, Orpheus, The Cage, Agon, Monumentum pro Gesualdo, Rubies, Symphony in Three Movements, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Concerto for Two Solo Pianos, Suite from L'Histoire du Soldat, Concertino, and Jeu de Cartes.

Mercurial Manoeuvres - New York City Ballet
September 24, 2011 -

This witty and cheerful piece for 21 dancers opens with an explosive male variation — a series of bravura leaps performed to a trumpet solo — that is followed by rapidly shifting ensemble work for a corps of women which materializes from behind gauze panels on each side of the stage. After a quietly mesmerizing pas de deux of unfolding turns, arrested leaps and intricate lifts, the ballet ends with squadrons of dancers flying on and off the stage in ever-changing directions, patterns, and diagonals. An early reviewer compared the work's intricate geometry to the paintings of Kandinsky and Malevich. The score by Russian composer Dimitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) fell in and out of favor with the Soviet government as the composer's creative development and fortunes were often determined by political events in the Soviet Union. Shostakovich studied at the Leningrad Conservatory, where his work was encouraged by Alexander Glazounov, the Conservatory's Principal. Shostakovich's 1926 graduation piece, The First Symphony, catapulted him to prominence. During the next decade he composed a satirical opera, The Nose (based on a story by Nicolai Gogol), three full-length ballets, and the first of many film scores. Shostakovich, whose work was influenced by Gustav Mahler and Cesar Franck, wrote 15 symphonies (several of them with epic themes relating to the Russian Revolution and World War II), concertos, quartets, operas, and patriotic cantatas. Christopher Wheeldon, a former soloist with New York City Ballet, retired from dancing in May 2000. He was born in Somerset, England, and joined The Royal Ballet in 1991, the same year he won the Gold Medal at the Prix de Lausanne Competition. In 1993, he was invited to become a member of the NYCB corps de ballet. In addition to dancing, he has choreographed works for New York City Ballet's Slavonic Dances (Dvorak) (1997) and Scènes de Ballet (Stravinsky) (1999), Boston Ballet, Colorado Ballet, Ballet Inc., The Royal Ballet, the Royal Ballet School, and the School of American Ballet. His work can also be seen in the feature film Center Stage (released May 2000). In 2000, Mr. Wheeldon was selected as New York City Ballet's first Artist in Residence.

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
September 24, 2011 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

La Sonnambula - New York City Ballet
September 24, 2011 -

Set in a darkly mysterious masked ball, the one-act La Sonnambula tells the story of a Poet who pays suit to a Coquette, who is escorted by the Host. After a series of exotic divertissements, the elegantly attired guests go in to supper, leaving the Poet to himself. In a moment, an apparition in white enters. She is a beautiful Sleepwalker. Entranced, the Poet tries repeatedly to wake her, but she eludes him. The jealous Coquette informs the Host of the Poet's advances to her; enraged, he stabs the Poet. The Sleepwalker reappears to bear the Poet's lifeless body away. The atmosphere of sinister menace that shadows the story is underscored by the Coquette's elaborate, encircling movements, the ball's rather pedestrian social dances, and the enigmatic dance entertainment. The combination of these choreographic elements with the central pas de deux for the Poet and Sleepwalker delineate the spirit of the 19th-century Romantic movement in stark contrast to the conventions it abhorred. Vittorio Rieti (b. 1898), was born in Alexandria, Egypt, and was educated at Milan and Rome. He composed the music for the ballets Barabau and Le Bal for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, both choreographed by Balanchine. He composed operas and orchestral and other instrumental works in the neoclassical style. He came to the United States in 1940 and collaborated with Balanchine on a number of ballets, including Waltz Academy for Ballet Theatre, Night Shadow for Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, The Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne for Ballet Society, and Native Dancers for New York City Ballet. Vincenzo Bellini (1801-35), was born in Sicily and died in France. He was a celebrated and highly popular composer of opera when vocal melody and vocal agility were its most valued constituents. He was a friend of Chopin, who greatly admired his melodic gift. His operas included Norma, Puritani di Scozia, and La Sonnambula. Book by Vittorio Rieti.

Union Jack - New York City Ballet
September 24, 2011 -

Union Jack was created to honor the British heritage of the United States on the occasion of its Bicentennial. Part I is based on Scottish military tattoos and folk-dance forms performed in an open castle square. Part II is a music-hall pas de deux for the costermonger Pearly King and Queen of London, with two little girls and a donkey, danced before a drop suggesting Pollock's toy theaters. Part III is a series of variations employing hornpipes, sea songs, work chants, jigs, and drill orders of the Royal Navy, in a dockside setting. For the finale, hand flags signal 'God Save the Queen' in semaphore code as the Union Jack unfurls. Hershy Kay (1919-1981) established himself as a preeminent orchestrator of musicals with Leonard Bernstein's On The Town in 1944. His works for the ballet include Cakewalk, Clowns, Western Symphony, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?, and Union Jack; his works for the musical theater include Peter Pan, Once Upon a Mattress, Candide, A Chorus Line, Evita and Barnum. A composer in his own right, Hershy Kay also reconstructed Louis Moreau Gottschalk's Grande Tarantelle for Piano and Orchestra, which later became the Balanchine ballet Tarantella. Mr. Kay's work also includes a children's record, Mother Goose.

Israel Galván - La Edad de Oro - Joyce Theater
Through September 25, 2011 -

Israel Galván, a winner of Spain's prestigious National Dance Award, opens the Joyce fall season with a sensational solo performance that shows why he has been called the William Forsythe of flamenco. Performing to pulsating live music that drives his lightning fast footwork, Galván embodies a post-modern approach to flamenco that strips the art down to its bare essence and gives it an inspired twist. "He is seductive without trying to be," proclaims The New York Times, "and if this is what new flamenco means, bring it on."

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
September 25, 2011 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

Union Jack - New York City Ballet
September 25, 2011 -

Union Jack was created to honor the British heritage of the United States on the occasion of its Bicentennial. Part I is based on Scottish military tattoos and folk-dance forms performed in an open castle square. Part II is a music-hall pas de deux for the costermonger Pearly King and Queen of London, with two little girls and a donkey, danced before a drop suggesting Pollock's toy theaters. Part III is a series of variations employing hornpipes, sea songs, work chants, jigs, and drill orders of the Royal Navy, in a dockside setting. For the finale, hand flags signal 'God Save the Queen' in semaphore code as the Union Jack unfurls. Hershy Kay (1919-1981) established himself as a preeminent orchestrator of musicals with Leonard Bernstein's On The Town in 1944. His works for the ballet include Cakewalk, Clowns, Western Symphony, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?, and Union Jack; his works for the musical theater include Peter Pan, Once Upon a Mattress, Candide, A Chorus Line, Evita and Barnum. A composer in his own right, Hershy Kay also reconstructed Louis Moreau Gottschalk's Grande Tarantelle for Piano and Orchestra, which later became the Balanchine ballet Tarantella. Mr. Kay's work also includes a children's record, Mother Goose.

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company - Body Against Body - New York Live Arts
Through September 25, 2011 -

Body Against Body returns to Bill T. Jones's roots in the avant-garde with a program that revives and reconsiders the challenging, groundbreaking works that launched Jones and the late Arnie Zane, his partner and collaborator of 17 years. These works, two of which premiered at Dance Theater Workshop in the '80s, include some of the most significant examples of the postmodern aesthetic; pieces that redefined the duet form and changed the face of American dance. Both conceptually and physically rigorous, the works take on new life through the diverse dancers of Jones's company, providing a rare look at the origins of a widely acclaimed choreographer. The program includes the newly reconstructed duets Valley Cottage: A Study (1980) and Monkey Run Road (1979), pieces not seen in New York City since their premiere performances.

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
September 27, 2011 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

Union Jack - New York City Ballet
September 27, 2011 -

Union Jack was created to honor the British heritage of the United States on the occasion of its Bicentennial. Part I is based on Scottish military tattoos and folk-dance forms performed in an open castle square. Part II is a music-hall pas de deux for the costermonger Pearly King and Queen of London, with two little girls and a donkey, danced before a drop suggesting Pollock's toy theaters. Part III is a series of variations employing hornpipes, sea songs, work chants, jigs, and drill orders of the Royal Navy, in a dockside setting. For the finale, hand flags signal 'God Save the Queen' in semaphore code as the Union Jack unfurls. Hershy Kay (1919-1981) established himself as a preeminent orchestrator of musicals with Leonard Bernstein's On The Town in 1944. His works for the ballet include Cakewalk, Clowns, Western Symphony, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?, and Union Jack; his works for the musical theater include Peter Pan, Once Upon a Mattress, Candide, A Chorus Line, Evita and Barnum. A composer in his own right, Hershy Kay also reconstructed Louis Moreau Gottschalk's Grande Tarantelle for Piano and Orchestra, which later became the Balanchine ballet Tarantella. Mr. Kay's work also includes a children's record, Mother Goose.

Jewels - New York City Ballet
September 28, 2011 -

Jewels is unique: a full-length, three-act plotless ballet that uses the music of three very different composers. Balanchine was inspired by the artistry of jewelry designer Claude Arpels, and chose music revealing the essence of each jewel. He explained: "Of course, I have always liked jewels; after all, I am an Oriental, from Georgia in the Caucasus. I like the color of gems, the beauty of stones, and it was wonderful to see how our costume workshop, under Karinska's direction, came so close to the quality of real stones (which were of course too heavy for the dancers to wear!)." Each section of the ballet is distinct in both music and mood. Emeralds, which Balanchine considered "an evocation of France — the France of elegance, comfort, dress, [and] perfume," recalls the 19th century dances of the French Romantics. Rubies is crisp and witty, epitomizing the collaboration of Stravinsky and Balanchine.Diamonds recalls the order and grandeur of Imperial Russia and the Maryinsky Theater, where Balanchine was trained. Mary Clarke and Clement Crisp have written: "If the entire imperial Russian inheritance of ballet were lost, Diamonds would still tell us of its essence."

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
September 29, 2011 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

La Sonnambula - New York City Ballet
September 29, 2011 -

Set in a darkly mysterious masked ball, the one-act La Sonnambula tells the story of a Poet who pays suit to a Coquette, who is escorted by the Host. After a series of exotic divertissements, the elegantly attired guests go in to supper, leaving the Poet to himself. In a moment, an apparition in white enters. She is a beautiful Sleepwalker. Entranced, the Poet tries repeatedly to wake her, but she eludes him. The jealous Coquette informs the Host of the Poet's advances to her; enraged, he stabs the Poet. The Sleepwalker reappears to bear the Poet's lifeless body away. The atmosphere of sinister menace that shadows the story is underscored by the Coquette's elaborate, encircling movements, the ball's rather pedestrian social dances, and the enigmatic dance entertainment. The combination of these choreographic elements with the central pas de deux for the Poet and Sleepwalker delineate the spirit of the 19th-century Romantic movement in stark contrast to the conventions it abhorred. Vittorio Rieti (b. 1898), was born in Alexandria, Egypt, and was educated at Milan and Rome. He composed the music for the ballets Barabau and Le Bal for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, both choreographed by Balanchine. He composed operas and orchestral and other instrumental works in the neoclassical style. He came to the United States in 1940 and collaborated with Balanchine on a number of ballets, including Waltz Academy for Ballet Theatre, Night Shadow for Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, The Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne for Ballet Society, and Native Dancers for New York City Ballet. Vincenzo Bellini (1801-35), was born in Sicily and died in France. He was a celebrated and highly popular composer of opera when vocal melody and vocal agility were its most valued constituents. He was a friend of Chopin, who greatly admired his melodic gift. His operas included Norma, Puritani di Scozia, and La Sonnambula. Book by Vittorio Rieti.

West Side Story Suite - New York City Ballet
September 29, 2011 -

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), the gifted and versatile American conductor and composer of symphonic music and Broadway shows, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. At the age of seventeen he entered Harvard, went on to study at the Curtis Institute, and then to Tanglewood. Serge Koussevitzky took great interest in his talent and promoted his conducting career, and his great chance came when, on short notice, he substituted brilliantly for Bruno Walter, who had become ill. He performed as a conductor and pianist, and lectured at universities and on television. His compositions ranged from the classical to the musical stage, and included Mass, Kaddish, West Side Story (again in collaboration with Jerome Robbins), Candide, and The Age of Anxiety. He was the first native-born American to become conductor of the New York Philharmonic, and he conducted around the world. Stephen Sondheim began his career as a lyricist on Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story, which premiered on September 26, 1957 at the Winter Garden Theater, and Jule Styne's Gypsy, which opened on May 21, 1959 at the Broadway Theatre. The impressive list of Broadway shows he went on to compose music and write lyrics for includes Follies, A Little Night Music, Pacific Overtures, Sweeney Todd, Merrily We Roll Along, Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods and Assassins. Sondheim's Passion, received several Tony awards in 1994. Early in his life, Stephen Sondheim developed a deep relationship with the Hammerstein family that would prove to have a profound impact on his life and his art. Oscar Hammerstein became his theatrical mentor, instructing his student in the creative process through a series of assignments — writing entire shows using different sources, from plays to original concepts. These lessons were taken seriously by Sondheim, who used them to explore the possibilities in his art form.

2 and 3 Part Inventions - New York City Ballet
September 30, 2011 -

J.S. Bach wrote these piano studies, Inventions and Sinfonias, between 1720 and 1723 to help instruct his son in the playing and handling of two- and three-part pieces. They are mostly short studies and have been given neither tempi nor dynamic marks. There are as many interpretations as there are pianists, as one can conclude by those recorded. Glenn Gould has even rearranged the order, mixing the two and three parts alternately. Jerome Robbins selected about a dozen of all the pieces for this work. Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was born into a family of musicians successful for over two centuries. Although later in his career he became most noted for his choral and other church-related compositions, he also left a large body of instrumental music for solo instruments and ensembles. While his popular reputation was eclipsed by the fame of his sons, he was revered by musicians and composers. Finally in the 19th century Mendelssohn brought his music to public attention and he became recognized as one of the greatest of all composers.

In Memory of... - New York City Ballet
September 30, 2011 -

Louis Krasner, an American violinist, commissioned a violin concerto from Alban Berg in early 1935. Berg, absorbed in the orchestration of his opera, Lulu, did no work on it until the death, from polio, of 18-year-old Manon Gropius. Her parents, Alma Mahler (composer Gustav Mahler's widow) and Walter Gropius were Berg's close friends. The concerto uses melodic themes from Mahler and a Carpathian folk song, and concludes with a treatment of J. S. Bach's cantata, O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort. Alban Berg (1885-1935), an Austrian, had little formal musical training before beginning his studies with the musical innovator Arnold Schoenberg in 1904. Berg, Schoenberg, and Berg's student Anton Webern formed the Second Viennese School. They were the originators of serialism: the 12-tone row of atonal music. Berg is most famous for his two operas, Wozzeck and Lulu. His writing, dense, dissonant and full of personal allusions and complex devices, was well regarded critically, but won little popular acceptance during his life.

West Side Story Suite - New York City Ballet
September 30, 2011 -

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), the gifted and versatile American conductor and composer of symphonic music and Broadway shows, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. At the age of seventeen he entered Harvard, went on to study at the Curtis Institute, and then to Tanglewood. Serge Koussevitzky took great interest in his talent and promoted his conducting career, and his great chance came when, on short notice, he substituted brilliantly for Bruno Walter, who had become ill. He performed as a conductor and pianist, and lectured at universities and on television. His compositions ranged from the classical to the musical stage, and included Mass, Kaddish, West Side Story (again in collaboration with Jerome Robbins), Candide, and The Age of Anxiety. He was the first native-born American to become conductor of the New York Philharmonic, and he conducted around the world. Stephen Sondheim began his career as a lyricist on Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story, which premiered on September 26, 1957 at the Winter Garden Theater, and Jule Styne's Gypsy, which opened on May 21, 1959 at the Broadway Theatre. The impressive list of Broadway shows he went on to compose music and write lyrics for includes Follies, A Little Night Music, Pacific Overtures, Sweeney Todd, Merrily We Roll Along, Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods and Assassins. Sondheim's Passion, received several Tony awards in 1994. Early in his life, Stephen Sondheim developed a deep relationship with the Hammerstein family that would prove to have a profound impact on his life and his art. Oscar Hammerstein became his theatrical mentor, instructing his student in the creative process through a series of assignments — writing entire shows using different sources, from plays to original concepts. These lessons were taken seriously by Sondheim, who used them to explore the possibilities in his art form.

Episodes - New York City Ballet
October 01, 2011 -

Episodes grew out of Balanchine's enthusiasm for Webern's music, to which he had been introduced by Stravinsky. Balanchine wrote that Webern's orchestral music... fills the air like molecules; it is written for atmosphere. The first time I heard it... the music seemed to me like Mozart and Stravinsky, music that can be danced to because it leaves the mind free to "see" the dancing. In listening to composers like Beethoven and Brahms, every listener has his own ideas, paints his own picture of what the music represents.... How can I, a choreographer, try to squeeze a dancing body into a picture that already exists in someone's mind? It simply won't work. But it will with Webern. Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein invited Martha Graham to choreograph a joint work with Balanchine using all of Webern's orchestral pieces. The result was no true collaboration but a work comprised of two separate sections. Graham's contribution, Episodes I, was danced by her company plus four dancers from New York City Ballet. Episodes II, created by Balanchine, was danced by New York City Ballet and Paul Taylor, who was then a dancer in Graham's company. After 1960, Graham's section and the solo variation were no longer performed at New York City Ballet. Anton von Webern (1883-1945), an Austrian, was part of the neoclassical movement in music. He was a musical scholar who adopted and extended Schoenberg's 12-tone method of composing music, which meant basing a composition on a "series" made up from the 12 notes of the chromatic scale arranged so that no note was repeated within the series. Webern became more and more rigorous in his attempt to compress or simplify his own style.

Fearful Symmetries - New York City Ballet
October 01, 2011 -

Fearful Symmetries is a ballet for two principal couples, a soloist couple, three corps men, six corps women, and four corps couples. It is the second work Peter Martins has choreographed to the music of John Adams. A large, complex ballet bathed in dramatic and ever-changing hues of red and blue created by Mark Stanley, it matches the music's racing pulse in striking combination. John Adams (b. 1947) grew up in New England and studied at Harvard with Leon Kirchner and Roger Sessions. He lives in San Francisco where he is music adviser to the San Francisco Symphony and a faculty member at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Influenced by John Cage and Steve Reich, Mr. Adams' music is both electronic and instrumental, and is known for its combination of minimalism and romanticism.

Jewels - New York City Ballet
October 01, 2011 -

Jewels is unique: a full-length, three-act plotless ballet that uses the music of three very different composers. Balanchine was inspired by the artistry of jewelry designer Claude Arpels, and chose music revealing the essence of each jewel. He explained: "Of course, I have always liked jewels; after all, I am an Oriental, from Georgia in the Caucasus. I like the color of gems, the beauty of stones, and it was wonderful to see how our costume workshop, under Karinska's direction, came so close to the quality of real stones (which were of course too heavy for the dancers to wear!)." Each section of the ballet is distinct in both music and mood. Emeralds, which Balanchine considered "an evocation of France — the France of elegance, comfort, dress, [and] perfume," recalls the 19th century dances of the French Romantics. Rubies is crisp and witty, epitomizing the collaboration of Stravinsky and Balanchine.Diamonds recalls the order and grandeur of Imperial Russia and the Maryinsky Theater, where Balanchine was trained. Mary Clarke and Clement Crisp have written: "If the entire imperial Russian inheritance of ballet were lost, Diamonds would still tell us of its essence."

Mercurial Manoeuvres - New York City Ballet
October 01, 2011 -

This witty and cheerful piece for 21 dancers opens with an explosive male variation — a series of bravura leaps performed to a trumpet solo — that is followed by rapidly shifting ensemble work for a corps of women which materializes from behind gauze panels on each side of the stage. After a quietly mesmerizing pas de deux of unfolding turns, arrested leaps and intricate lifts, the ballet ends with squadrons of dancers flying on and off the stage in ever-changing directions, patterns, and diagonals. An early reviewer compared the work's intricate geometry to the paintings of Kandinsky and Malevich. The score by Russian composer Dimitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) fell in and out of favor with the Soviet government as the composer's creative development and fortunes were often determined by political events in the Soviet Union. Shostakovich studied at the Leningrad Conservatory, where his work was encouraged by Alexander Glazounov, the Conservatory's Principal. Shostakovich's 1926 graduation piece, The First Symphony, catapulted him to prominence. During the next decade he composed a satirical opera, The Nose (based on a story by Nicolai Gogol), three full-length ballets, and the first of many film scores. Shostakovich, whose work was influenced by Gustav Mahler and Cesar Franck, wrote 15 symphonies (several of them with epic themes relating to the Russian Revolution and World War II), concertos, quartets, operas, and patriotic cantatas. Christopher Wheeldon, a former soloist with New York City Ballet, retired from dancing in May 2000. He was born in Somerset, England, and joined The Royal Ballet in 1991, the same year he won the Gold Medal at the Prix de Lausanne Competition. In 1993, he was invited to become a member of the NYCB corps de ballet. In addition to dancing, he has choreographed works for New York City Ballet's Slavonic Dances (Dvorak) (1997) and Scènes de Ballet (Stravinsky) (1999), Boston Ballet, Colorado Ballet, Ballet Inc., The Royal Ballet, the Royal Ballet School, and the School of American Ballet. His work can also be seen in the feature film Center Stage (released May 2000). In 2000, Mr. Wheeldon was selected as New York City Ballet's first Artist in Residence.

To the Ones I Love - Brooklyn Academy of Music
Through October 01, 2011 -

A provocative merging of traditional and contemporary modern dance, Belgian choreographer Thierry Smits' To the Ones I Love celebrates the male physique's beauty, power, and capacity for expression. It also pays homage to movement at its purest, unencumbered by narrative and infused with artfully woven elements of hip-hop, martial arts, African dance, and ballet. Set to a score by Bach and an electronic soundscape by Maxime Bodson, this work features nine men acutely in tune with one another as they move across an austere white set that amplifies their athletic movements—a mix of zen-like concentration and unbridled joy.

Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca - Joyce Theater
Through October 02, 2011 -

The Joyce's fall flamenco fare continues with a dazzling week of performances by Bessie Award winner Soledad Barrio, whose compelling artistry prompted The New York Times to proclaim that "there's something voyeuristic and cathartic about watching a woman pry open her soul, scatter it on the floor and put it back together again." Hailing from Spain, Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca, the company she founded in 1993 with her husband Artistic Director Martin Santangelo, perform flamenco in its finest and most authentic form, one that creates a true communal spirit through exuberant music, dance, and song. "There has been no company I have been so glad to discover as Noche Flamenca and, above all, its lead dancer, Soledad Barrio," proclaims Alastair Macaulay of The New York Times, "I can think of no current ballet star in the world as marvelous as she."

Beginner Flamenco Singing Class-Fall Session - Flamenco Latino
Through December 17, 2011 - New York

Flamenco Latino offers a new class in Cante (flamenco singing) for beginners. Most classes will be led by Alfonso Cid with a couple of sessions led by Basilio Georges and Aurora Reyes on the established material.

Fall Session runs September 8-December 19, 2011 on Thursdays 6:30-7:30 pm at

Flamenco Latino Studio 250 W. 54th St., Suite 404 New York, NY 10019 212-399-8519

Cost: Fall term prices: --12 pack paid in advance- $192.00 ($16/class) --12 pack paid in three installments by credit card- $204.00($68/4wk term, $17/class) --4 pack paid in advance-$72.00 ($18/class) --Walk in class- $20.00 (only available until 9/27)

In this course, students will learn the basics of flamenco singing, emphasizing diaphragmatic breathing and voice placement or “impostatción.” The class will start building upon basic cante repertoire such as sevillanas, tangos,fandangos and rumbas. The class will also focus on flamenco rhythms and handclapping, flamenco scales and terminology so students can communicate in the traditional lingo with guitarists and flamenco dancers.

Lyrics and translations of the “letras” will be provided. The course is taught in English, and no previous knowledge of music or Spanish is required. It is ideal for people who want to deepen their understanding of flamenco music or for flamenco dancers who want to broaden their experience of this art form.

Please respond by email or call 212-399-8519 with questions or to reserve.

Flamenco Latino Fall Classes - Flamenco Latino Studio
Through December 19, 2011 - NY

Flamenco Latino offers a wide variety of classes each week in their midtown studio at 244 W 54th St., 4th fl.! Fall term: September 6- December 19, 2011.

Monday: Basic Beginner Flamenco with Aurora Reyes, Mon. 6-7 pm; Advanced Beginner Flamenco with Aurora, Mon. 7-8:30 pm; Group Intermediate Cante Class with Alfonso Cid, Mon. 8:30-9:45 pm.

Tuesday: Advanced Beginner Flamenco Incorporating Props (Castanets, Hat, Fan & Shawl) with Aurora, Tues. 6-7:30 pm.

Wednesday: Beginner Sevillanas with Aurora, Wed. 6:30-8 pm; Advanced Beginner Flamenco Guitar Group with Basilio Georges, Wed. 8:00-9:30 pm.

Thursday: Beginner Cante with Alfonso and Basilio, Thurs. 6:30-7:30 pm; Flamenco Music Ensemble with Basilio, Thurs. 7:30-9:30 pm.

Friday: Intermediate Group Guitar with Basilio, Fri. 12:15-1:15 pm.

Saturday: Advanced Beginner/Intermediate Flamenco with Aurora, Sat. 3:00-4:00 pm; Basic Beginner Flamenco Guitar Group with Basilio, Sat. 4:00-5:00 pm.

Fall term prices: --12 pack paid in advance- $192.00 ($16/class); --12 pack paid in three installments by credit card- $204.00($68/4wk term,$17/class); --4 pack paid in advance-$72.00 ($18/class); --Walk in class- $20.00 (only available until 9/27).

Email [email protected] or Call now with questions or to reserve! 212-399-8519 www.flamencolatino.com

Flamenco Class Incorporating Props - Flamenco Latino Studio
Through December 19, 2011 - New York

Aurora Reyes, of Flamenco Latino, offers

Flamenco Dance Incorporating Props for Adv. Beginners Tuesdays, 6-7:30 PM. Fall term runs September 6- December 19, 2011 at

Flamenco Latino Studio, 244 W54 St., 4th fl. (bet. Broadway and 8th Ave.).

Technique and choreography for dances that use... -- castanets and Sombrero Cordoves. For example, Tanguillos de Cadiz, and Garrotin (hat only) dances. --Abanico (fan) as in such dances as Guajiras (fan + castanets) and Caracoles (fan only). -- manton (shawl) used in Solea and Seguiriya.

We plan to rotate palos. We have extra fans, mantons, hats and castanets at the studio in case you forget yours!

Fall term prices: --12 pack paid in advance- $192.00 ($16/class) --12 pack paid in three installments by credit card- $204.00($68/4wk term,$17/class) --4 pack paid in advance-$72.00 ($18/class) --Walk in class- $20.00 (only available until 9/27)

Email or Call 212-399-8519 to reserve. www.flamencolatino.com

CSI: The Experience - Discovery Times Square
Through January 01, 2012 - New York

Play the role of a crime scene investigator at CSI: The Experience! As the latest recruit in the world of forensic science, guests are guided by videos featuring CSI: cast members and real-life forensic scientists. Throughout the exhibition you must examine blood types, while matching DNA to potential suspects in order to complete the investigation process and solve the crime. Complete with 3 Crime Scenes, 15 Forensic Lab Stations, and dazzling special effects, this hands-on experience is sure to plunge exhibit goers deep into the science of solving crimes.


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