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Turkish Taste at the Court of Marie-Antoinette
at Frick Collection

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Add to Calendar 08-06-2011 11-09-2011 15 Turkish Taste at the Court of Marie-Antoinette France has long been fascinated by the Ottoman Empire, and for hundreds of years the taste for turquerie was evident in French fashion, literature, theater and opera, painting, architecture, and interior decoration. Turquerie, a term that came into use in the early nineteenth century, referred to essentially anything produced in the West that evoked or imitated Turkish culture. It was during the late eighteenth century at the court of Marie-Antoinette that the Turkish style reached new heights, inspiring some of the period's most original creations, namely boudoirs or cabinets decorated entirely in the Turkish manner. In 1776 and 1777, several operas and plays with Turkish themes were performed at the French court, increasing the nobility's interest in Turkish style. Soon thereafter, three interiors à la turque were created for the comte d'Artois, Louis XVI's younger brother, and Marie-Antoinette commissioned boudoirs turcs for her apartments at Versailles and Fontainebleau. Since these retreats were intended for private entertaining, interior decorators were allowed more freedom than was permitted for the official, more public apartments at court. The highly theatrical rooms featured furniture and wall panels decorated with turbaned figures, camels, palm trees, and other Turkish motifs, but their form and function remained essentially French. Created for the royal family and wealthy aristocrats, the objects were always of the highest quality, made by the best artists and craftsmen of the day. This summer, The Frick Collection will present a dossier exhibition featuring several pieces made in the Turkish manner for members of the French court, including a pair of console tables acquired by Henry Clay Frick in 1914, that illustrate a particularly inventive aspect of French eighteenth-century decorative style. The exhibition is organized by Charlotte Vignon, Associate Curator of Decorative Arts, The Frick Collection. http://www.cityguideny.com/eventinfo.cfm?id=84793 Frick Collection true DD/MM/YYYY

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Date: 06/08/11 through 09/11/11
Ages: All Ages
Address: 1 E. 70th St. (Madison-Fifth Aves.) - 212-288-0700
www.frick.org

Description: France has long been fascinated by the Ottoman Empire, and for hundreds of years the taste for turquerie was evident in French fashion, literature, theater and opera, painting, architecture, and interior decoration. Turquerie, a term that came into use in the early nineteenth century, referred to essentially anything produced in the West that evoked or imitated Turkish culture. It was during the late eighteenth century at the court of Marie-Antoinette that the Turkish style reached new heights, inspiring some of the period's most original creations, namely boudoirs or cabinets decorated entirely in the Turkish manner. In 1776 and 1777, several operas and plays with Turkish themes were performed at the French court, increasing the nobility's interest in Turkish style. Soon thereafter, three interiors à la turque were created for the comte d'Artois, Louis XVI's younger brother, and Marie-Antoinette commissioned boudoirs turcs for her apartments at Versailles and Fontainebleau. Since these retreats were intended for private entertaining, interior decorators were allowed more freedom than was permitted for the official, more public apartments at court. The highly theatrical rooms featured furniture and wall panels decorated with turbaned figures, camels, palm trees, and other Turkish motifs, but their form and function remained essentially French. Created for the royal family and wealthy aristocrats, the objects were always of the highest quality, made by the best artists and craftsmen of the day. This summer, The Frick Collection will present a dossier exhibition featuring several pieces made in the Turkish manner for members of the French court, including a pair of console tables acquired by Henry Clay Frick in 1914, that illustrate a particularly inventive aspect of French eighteenth-century decorative style. The exhibition is organized by Charlotte Vignon, Associate Curator of Decorative Arts, The Frick Collection.

Venue Description: The Frick Collection is one of New York City's most beloved cultural treasures; with the extraordinary works of Western European art from the Renaissance right up to the end of the 19th century, industrialist Henry Clay Frick charitably bequeathed his collection to the public. The Frick family's former Fifth Avenue mansion and the unique ambience of an art connoisseur's private home has been preserved in the Frick Collection. Remarkable paintings, sculptures, and decorative art objects are presented in public programs, such as free lectures and concerts. The Frick Art Reference Library is esteemed worldwide by scholars and students, and is also open to the public. The Frick Collection's sixty-seventh concert season presents a number of exciting debuts of European artists. It is also the first time that a concert and preconcert lecture will be offered in conjunction with a special exhibition.

The Frick Collection is located at 1 East 70th Street (between Madison and Fifth Avenues) and is open six days a week: Tuesday through Saturday 10am-6pm and Sundays 11am-5pm. The Collection is closed on Mondays and public holidays. The museum is fully accessible to the disabled. Admission into the Frick Collection is $15 for adults; $10 for senior citizens (62 and over); and $5 for students with valid identification. On Sundays, pay what you wish from 11am-1pm. The price of admission includes the ArtPhone audio guide. Lectures are open to the public without charge 30 minutes before the event. Group visits are by appointment only. Lecturing in the galleries is prohibited. Free coat checking is provided in the coat room. Coats (if not worn), packages, umbrellas, and large handbags must be left there. Unfortunately, luggage is not accepted. The Frick Art Reference library is located just around the corner from The Frick Collection at 10 East 71st Street (between Madison and Fifth Avenues) and is open Monday through Friday 10am-5pm, Saturdays 9:30am-1pm, and is closed Sundays, holiday weekends, Saturdays in June and July, and during the month of August. First-time researchers must bring a photo ID and arrive before 3pm on weekdays or 11am on Saturdays. The Library is open to all adult researchers free of charge.

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