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Diary of Yunbogi + Kyoto, My Mother's Place

02/10/18 | 9:00 PM

Anthology Film Archives

32 2nd Ave Map

212-505-5181

$7 and up


10-02-2018 12:00:00 10-02-2018 12:00:00 America/New_York Diary of Yunbogi + Kyoto, My Mother's Place | 9:00 PM OF YUNBOGI / YUNBOGI NO NIKKI (1965, 30 min, 16mm, b&w. In Japanese with English subtitles. Print courtesy of the Japan Foundation.) As many of his features from the 1960s would demonstrate, Oshima was concerned with the reverberating ills of Japanese imperialism in Korea. DIARY OF YUNBOGI is a focused yet lyrical nonfiction film that combines actual diary entries narrated by a 6-year-old boy with a montage of photographs taken by Oshima himself during a 1965 trip to South Korea. While the two countries had reached post-war diplomacy, the Korean peninsula was still crippled by poverty. Oshima's camera takes to the slums and captures the faces of street urchins, rendering visible Taegu's "50,000 orphans after the war," a condition echoed by Korea's other inner cities. Oshima's concerns with systematic modes of oppression, specifically in the Japan-Korea context would find resonance in later films such as SING A SONG OF SEX (1967) and DEATH BY HANGING (1968). Similarly, his remarkable sensitivity to the innocence of children as observed in YUNBOGI finds a fictional complement in BOY (1969). & KYOTO, MY MOTHER'S PLACE (1991, 50 min, digital) Commissioned for British television, this is both a poignant ode to the filmmaker's mother and a foray into the former capital city's imperial past. The demure movements of the camera gliding through architecture and contemporary city life are punctuated by shots of old photographs, images from classical painting and theater, and staged interviews with the filmmaker's maternal relatives. Oshima's familial reverence provides an emotional constant, yet the film's restrained pacing and Oshima's own clipped English narration keeps us at bay, as if echoing the inflexibility of Kyoto's patriarchal traditions. For Oshima, Kyoto is a place, a memory, and a historical artifact, and MY MOTHER'S PLACE is an attempt to capture that tenuous balance. http://www.cityguideny.com/eventinfo.cfm?id=279644 Anthology Film Archives Anthology Film Archives

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OF YUNBOGI / YUNBOGI NO NIKKI (1965, 30 min, 16mm, b&w. In Japanese with English subtitles. Print courtesy of the Japan Foundation.) As many of his features from the 1960s would demonstrate, Oshima was concerned with the reverberating ills of Japanese imperialism in Korea. DIARY OF YUNBOGI is a focused yet lyrical nonfiction film that combines actual diary entries narrated by a 6-year-old boy with a montage of photographs taken by Oshima himself during a 1965 trip to South Korea. While the two countries had reached post-war diplomacy, the Korean peninsula was still crippled by poverty. Oshima's camera takes to the slums and captures the faces of street urchins, rendering visible Taegu's "50,000 orphans after the war," a condition echoed by Korea's other inner cities. Oshima's concerns with systematic modes of oppression, specifically in the Japan-Korea context would find resonance in later films such as SING A SONG OF SEX (1967) and DEATH BY HANGING (1968). Similarly, his remarkable sensitivity to the innocence of children as observed in YUNBOGI finds a fictional complement in BOY (1969). & KYOTO, MY MOTHER'S PLACE (1991, 50 min, digital) Commissioned for British television, this is both a poignant ode to the filmmaker's mother and a foray into the former capital city's imperial past. The demure movements of the camera gliding through architecture and contemporary city life are punctuated by shots of old photographs, images from classical painting and theater, and staged interviews with the filmmaker's maternal relatives. Oshima's familial reverence provides an emotional constant, yet the film's restrained pacing and Oshima's own clipped English narration keeps us at bay, as if echoing the inflexibility of Kyoto's patriarchal traditions. For Oshima, Kyoto is a place, a memory, and a historical artifact, and MY MOTHER'S PLACE is an attempt to capture that tenuous balance.

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