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The Women of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (A League of Their Own)

08/10/18 | 5pm (before the Yankees-Rangers game)

Yankee Stadium

1 E 161st St, Bronx Map

866-800-1275


10-08-2018 12:00:00 10-08-2018 12:00:00 America/New_York The Women of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (A League of Their Own) | 5pm (before the Yankees-Rangers game) Former players from the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2018), of A League of Their Own fame, will be honored at Yankee Stadium before the home game on August 10th. The women will be signing autographs from 5:00-6:15pm, before being introduced on the field at 6:50pm accompanied by a short video on the history of the AAGPBL. Finally, former nun Katie Horstman will throw out the first pitch of the game. The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League marked its 75th anniversary on May 30, 2018, the date of the first game in 1943. The AAGPBL was formed by Chicago Cubs owner and chewing gum mogul Philip K. Wrigley in response to the War Department's plans to draft large numbers of men, including MLB players, for World War II during the summer of 1943. After rigorous tryouts, 60 women—some of them as young as 15—were signed to professional league contracts earning salaries of $45-$85 a week ($656-$1239 today). They were divided into 4 teams: the Kenosha (WI) Comets, Racine (WI) Belles, Rockford (IL) Peaches (of A League of Their Own fame), and the South Bend (IN) Blue Sox. 108 games were played during the regular season, and the team to win the most games was declared the pennant winner. The top two teams then competed in a series of play-off games for the League Championship. The Racine Belles won the 1943 season and became the first World Champions of the All-American Girls Baseball League. Over its 12-year run, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League gave more than 600 women the opportunity to play professional baseball for the first time. The league disbanded in 1954, but it has stayed with the players for the rest of their lives. Marilyn Jenkins (age 83) says the AAGPBL was "a great opportunity to learn about baseball and 'life' from great female athletes," and according to Lois Youngen, 83, "It helped me realize the true meaning of 'team.' We win or lose together." Through A League of Their Own, the league's story has become a part of American culture. Today, the former players continue to push for greater strides and recognition in women's baseball. In 2003, the sport was officially incorporated into the AAU and, in 2004, USA Baseball authorized the first official national women's baseball team, which won the gold medal in the first Women's Baseball World Cup against teams from around the world. The sport's landscape is changing, and it all started 75 years ago with the 60 pioneering women of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. http://www.cityguideny.com/eventinfo.cfm?id=320478 Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium

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Former players from the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2018), of A League of Their Own fame, will be honored at Yankee Stadium before the home game on August 10th. The women will be signing autographs from 5:00-6:15pm, before being introduced on the field at 6:50pm accompanied by a short video on the history of the AAGPBL. Finally, former nun Katie Horstman will throw out the first pitch of the game.

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League marked its 75th anniversary on May 30, 2018, the date of the first game in 1943. The AAGPBL was formed by Chicago Cubs owner and chewing gum mogul Philip K. Wrigley in response to the War Department's plans to draft large numbers of men, including MLB players, for World War II during the summer of 1943.

After rigorous tryouts, 60 women—some of them as young as 15—were signed to professional league contracts earning salaries of $45-$85 a week ($656-$1239 today). They were divided into 4 teams:  the Kenosha (WI) Comets, Racine (WI) Belles, Rockford (IL) Peaches (of A League of Their Own fame), and the South Bend (IN) Blue Sox. 108 games were played during the regular season, and the team to win the most games was declared the pennant winner. The top two teams then competed in a series of play-off games for the League Championship. The Racine Belles won the 1943 season and became the first World Champions of the All-American Girls Baseball League.

Over its 12-year run, the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League gave more than 600 women the opportunity to play professional baseball for the first time. The league disbanded in 1954, but it has stayed with the players for the rest of their lives. Marilyn Jenkins (age 83) says the AAGPBL was "a great opportunity to learn about baseball and 'life' from great female athletes," and according to Lois Youngen, 83, "It helped me realize the true meaning of 'team.' We win or lose together."  Through A League of Their Own, the league's story has become a part of American culture.

Today, the former players continue to push for greater strides and recognition in women's baseball. In 2003, the sport was officially incorporated into the AAU and, in 2004, USA Baseball authorized the first official national women's baseball team, which won the gold medal in the first Women's Baseball World Cup against teams from around the world. The sport's landscape is changing, and it all started 75 years ago with the 60 pioneering women of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

This event has already taken place. Click here for the latest events.

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