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Things to do this week in NYC Aug 25-Sep 1: Museums

August 25, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

SEE IT BIG! SCREENING: BRAZIL - Museum of the Moving Image
August 25, 2012 - Queens

Dir. Terry Gilliam. 1985, 132 mins. 35mm. With Jonathan Pryce, Robert De Niro, Ian Holm, Michael Palin. Gilliam's jaw-dropping dystopian science-fiction black comedy, which was almost shelved by Universal, imagines a totalitarian surveillance society that would make Orwell envious. When minor bureaucrat Pryce notices a clerical error that led the state to arrest the wrong man, it sets him on a quest for freedom, and makes him public enemy number one.

SEE IT BIG! SCREENING: BLUE VELVET - Museum of the Moving Image
August 25, 2012 - Astoria

Dir. David Lynch. 1986, 120 mins. 35mm. With Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper, Dean Stockwell. This nightmarish vision of the suburban underbelly forever marked Lynch as America's premiere poet of the perverse. MacLachlan's straight-arrow kid finds himself drawn ever deeper into a mystery involving a severed human ear, a melancholy lounge singer (Rossellini), and a violent, gas-huffing maniac (Hopper, in a career-defining performance).

Spies in the House of Art - Photography, Film, and Video - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 26, 2012 -

Artists are the secret constituency of museums, inspired and challenged not only by the objects and collections they display but also by the spaces in which they are shown and the authority they represent. Most artists aspire to see their works in museums, even if they joke among themselves about how museums are mausoleums, places where art goes to die. In telling stories about how and why art gets made, museums provide a ready-made foil for artists to react against and clarify their own positions. This selection of photography, film, and video from the permanent collection surveys the various ways museums inspire the making of works of art. A museum can be the setting for a new work or provide the raw material for creations that build upon a previous aesthetic experience. The camera can highlight the estrangement of objects from their original functions, unlock from a straitlaced decorousness of display the desires -- libidinal or otherwise -- that engendered the objects in the first place, or make visible the imaginative projection that underlies much looking at art. At a time when the automatic reflex of a technologically harried and distracted museum visitor may be to point and shoot, capture and move on, these works suggest the benefit of stepping back, reflecting, and lingering. In an unprecedented commingling of old and new works, Andrea Fraser's video Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk (1989) will be exhibited alongside paintings by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Alexandre Cabanel, and Franz Xaver Winterhalter in Gallery 809 within the Galleries of Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art, around the corner from the main installation. A complementary installation of a dozen photographs from the medium's beginnings to the early 1970s will be on view through May 6 in Gallery 850.

Playing House - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 26, 2012 -

Playing House is the first in a series of installations that aim to engage visitors with the Brooklyn Museum's period rooms. Artists Betty Woodman, Anne Chu, Ann Agee, and Mary Lucier have been invited to place site-specific artwork in eight of the Museum's historic rooms, which have been interpreted by curators over the years to illustrate how Americans of various times, economic levels, and locations lived. The artists were asked to consider these factors when developing their ideas. The project originated with Woodman's observation that although being an artist means confronting the art of the past, no one can enter the past -- except through "make believe," or "playing house," by which the past can be appropriated. Chu created magical birds and flowers out of textiles, feathers, paper, and metal, unexpectedly bringing nature and the outside world into the rooms. Lucier, who is descended from Dutch and Huguenot settlers, created videos that evoke memories of place and where we come from. Agee transformed the strict social order and luxury of the Milligan rooms into an artisan's workshop, and Woodman created table settings and "carpets" incorporating painting and ceramics. Playing House occupies the Cupola House Dining Room, the Russell Parlor, the Cane Acres Plantation Dining Room, the Worsham-Rockefeller Moorish Smoking Room, the Schenck Houses, the Weil-Worgelt Study, and the Milligan Parlor and Library. The installation is organized by Barry R. Harwood, Curator of Decorative Arts, and Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum.

Sanford Biggers and Jennifer Zackin: a small world... - The Jewish Museum
Through August 26, 2012 -

In the collaborative video a small world..., artists Sanford Biggers and Jennifer Zackin juxtapose home movies of their families -- one African American and one Jewish American --- to explore the intersections of middle-class life across racial lines. Originally recorded in silent super-8 film, the video shows the artists as children growing up in New York and Los Angeles in the 1970s. Typical family events and holidays -- birthdays, Hanukkah, Christmas, barbecues, family trips to Disneyland, playtime in the backyard -- are shown simultaneously, drawing attention to similarities of class while recognizing differences of ethnicity.

The Parade: Nathalie Djurberg with Music by Hans Berg - New Museum
Through August 26, 2012 - New York

"The Parade: Nathalie Djurberg with Music by Hans Berg" is Djurberg's most ambitious multimedia installation to date. Originally organized by the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Djurberg will adapt this spectacular installation for the New Museum's 'Studio 231' space. In the hands of Swedish artist Nathalie Djurberg, animation becomes a medium for transgressive and nightmarish allegories of desire and malcontent. Since 2001, she has honed a distinctive style of filmmaking, using the pliability of clay to dramatize our most primal urges -- jealousy, revenge, greed, submission, and gluttony. Set to music and sound effects by her collaborator, Hans Berg, Djurberg's videos plumb the dark recesses of the mind, drawing sometimes disturbing connections between human psychology and animal behavior. Increasingly, the artists' interdisciplinary collaborations have blurred the cinematic, the sculptural, and the performative in immersive environments that pair moving images and musical compositions with related set pieces. For her new work, The Parade (2011), Djurberg has created five captivating animations and an unnerving menagerie of more than eighty freestanding bird sculptures. Drawing on avian physiology, rituals of mating and territorial display, and the social phenomenon of flocking, she has assembled a fantastical procession of species all fashioned from modest materials such as clay, wire, and painted canvas. These hybrid, sometimes monstrous forms speak to the artist's recurring interest in physical and psychological transformation, as well as pageantry, perversion, and abjection. In the accompanying claymation videos, humans and animals alike act out upsetting scenarios of torture, humiliation, and masquerade, further mining the interplay of brutality and guilt at the heart of Djurberg's work. Berg's eerie film scores -- composed of elements both found and invented -- suffuse the entire installation, merging to form a unified soundscape. With these films, both artists have begun to conceive narrative in spatial terms as aspects of character, setting, sound, and action migrate from one story to the next across the exhibition space. Born in Lysekil, Sweden, in 1978, Nathalie Djurberg received her MFA from Malm� Art Academy in 2002, and since that time she has exhibited widely in solo and group exhibitions around the world. Most notably, in 2009 she presented her installation The Experiment in the exhibition "Making Worlds" at the 53rd Venice Biennale, for which she was awarded the prestigious Silver Lion for Promising Young Artist. In 2008, Djurberg participated in the New Museum's "After Nature" exhibition curated by Massimiliano Gioni. She currently lives and works in Berlin with Hans Berg. Hans Berg was born in Rattvik, Sweden, in 1978. He is a Berlin-based electronic music producer and self-taught musician. He began playing the drums in punk and rock bands at the age of fourteen. By fifteen, Berg started creating electronic music -- which he has made ever since -- when he purchased his first synthesizer and sampler. Berg and Djurberg met in Berlin in 2004. Since then, he has composed the music for all of her films and installations. The exhibition is curated by Eric Crosby and Dean Otto for the Walker Art Center and organized at the New Museum by Gary Carrion-Murayari, Curator.

SEE IT BIG! SCREENING: BRAZIL - Museum of the Moving Image
August 26, 2012 - Queens

Dir. Terry Gilliam. 1985, 132 mins. 35mm. With Jonathan Pryce, Robert De Niro, Ian Holm, Michael Palin. Gilliam's jaw-dropping dystopian science-fiction black comedy, which was almost shelved by Universal, imagines a totalitarian surveillance society that would make Orwell envious. When minor bureaucrat Pryce notices a clerical error that led the state to arrest the wrong man, it sets him on a quest for freedom, and makes him public enemy number one.

SEE IT BIG! SCREENING: BLUE VELVET - Museum of the Moving Image
August 26, 2012 - Astoria

Dir. David Lynch. 1986, 120 mins. 35mm. With Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper, Dean Stockwell. This nightmarish vision of the suburban underbelly forever marked Lynch as America's premiere poet of the perverse. MacLachlan's straight-arrow kid finds himself drawn ever deeper into a mystery involving a severed human ear, a melancholy lounge singer (Rossellini), and a violent, gas-huffing maniac (Hopper, in a career-defining performance).

Heinrich Kuehn and His American Circle: Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen - Neue Galerie
Through August 27, 2012 - New York

The Neue Galerie New York will present "Heinrich Kuehn and His American Circle: Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen," an exhibition focusing on the luminous work of this important Austrian photographer. The organizing curator for the project is Dr. Monika Faber, a distinguished scholar of photography. "Heinrich Kuehn and His American Circle" aims to situate Kuehn with regard to both the Viennese avant-garde and the international development of photography as an art form. It explores the close friendship among Kuehn and major American photographers Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen. The early pictorial work of photographer Heinrich Kuehn (1866-1944) was highly influential in turn-of-the-century circles; his work was exhibited at the Vienna Secession. Gradually, Kuehn incorporated the influence of his peers, and moved in the direction of Modernist photography. He was also among the first important photographers to create color images. Photographic prints and autochromes by Kuehn will be included in the exhibition.

Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 27, 2012 - Midtown

Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language is a group exhibition that brings together 12 contemporary artists and artists' groups working in all mediums including painting, sculpture, film, video, audio, and design, all of whom concentrate on the material qualities of language -- visual, aural, and beyond. The work that these artists create belongs to a distinguished history of poem/objects, and concrete language experiments that dates to the beginnings of modernism, and includes both the Dada and Futurist moments as well as the recrudescence of Neo-Dada in the late 1950s, and international literary movements like concrete and sound poetry in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Like visual artists who experimented with abstract forms with the goal of arriving at a non-metaphoric artwork that was itself and nothing else, artists working with words in the late 1950s and 1960s used language as a medium; letters, words, and texts were dissected, displayed as objects, or arranged so that form and content were combined. The works in Ecstatic Alphabets represent a radical updating of the possibilities inherent in the relationship between art and language. In this exhibition, the letter, the word and the phrase are seen and experienced, and not necessarily read. Physicalized, transcribed into sounds, symbols, pictures or patterns, scrambled, or negated, language is freed from the page as well as from its received meanings, received forms, and, in some cases, the duties of communication altogether. Working with language has also created an opportunity for artists to move more freely among disciplines, and this exhibition includes work in a range of mediums by artists who are also poets, writers, performers, and graphic designers. Like earlier experiments in this vein, many of these recent works have an abiding connection to poetry, which runs like a subtheme through the exhibition, adding the ecstatic element to each works' alphabetic plainness. The exhibition is divided into two sections, with the first featuring an abbreviated timeline of language in modern art culled primarily from drawings, sculptures, prints, books, and sound works from MoMA's collection. Artists in this historical section of the exhibition include: Carl Andre, Marcel Broodthaers, Henri Chopin, Marcel Duchamp, Ian Hamilton Finlay, John Giorno, Kitasono Katue, Ferdinand Kriwet, Liliane Lijn, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Bruce Nauman, Lawrence Weiner, and others. Artists in the contemporary section of the exhibition include: Ei Arakawa/Nikolas Gambaroff, Tauba Auerbach, Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey), Trisha Donnelly, Shannon Ebner, Paul Elliman, Experimental Jetset, Sharon Hayes, Karl Holmqvist, Paulina Olowska, Adam Pendleton, and Nora Schultz. The exhibition is accompanied by a publication designed and produced by Dexter Sinister.

Gustav Klimt: 150th Anniversary Celebration - Neue Galerie
Through August 27, 2012 - New York

Throughout 2012, Austria is celebrating the 150th birthday of Gustav Klimt with exhibitions devoted to his work. Several Viennese museums, including the Albertina, the Belvedere, the Kunsthistorisches, the Leopold, and the Wien Museum, are honoring different aspects of Klimt�s extraordinary legacy. The Neue Galerie is joining in these celebrations with a special summer 2012 installation of his work.

Tibet House US Presents: Mystic Nostalgia - Tibet House US Gallery
Through August 29, 2012 - New York

Tibet House US will present its next art exhibition entitled Mystic Nostalgia, featuring the gorgeous and imaginative paintings of Brazilian artist Tiffani Gyatso. This incredible body of work will be on display at the Tibet House US Gallery from June 14 – August 29, 2012, beginning with a special opening reception on June 14, 2012, from 6-8pm. Gyatso’s colorful and emotive paintings fuse traditional Tibetan imagery with her own contemporary style inspired by her own spiritual search. Mystic Nostalgia reflects the internal process to understand those things in life that we do not yet have answers for, and sometimes cannot even articulate or name – the mystic unknown. Captivating in its beauty and imagination, the exhibition reflects the spiritual journey and its pilgrimages through the inner places of love, heartbreak, fortitude and trust. “These paintings took birth from an inner process of trying to find answers for those things with no name,” says Gyatso. Though her work is rooted in sacred iconography from Tibet, Gyatso also paints images that are abstract, inspired by inner gods and demons. Gyatso suggests that most of her paintings “come from a broken heart trying to deal with illusions and passions, basing thought on the Buddhist dharma teachings, adopting a vision of spiritual practice through all that happens in the deep turmoil of samsara - the continuous cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth.”

On Paper: Impressionist, Modern, and Post-War Masters - Hammer Galleries
Through August 31, 2012 - New York

On Paper features an international selection of artists including over forty significant pastels, gouaches, pencil drawings and collages from Impressionist, Modern and Post War Masters. Beginning with drawings from the Impressionist era, the exhibition includes several exceptional works by Honoré Daumier, Pierre-Auguste Renoir from and Mary Cassatt. Continuing into the twentieth century, On Paper showcases important works by Modern Masters such as Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró and Kees van Dongen, as well as Surrealist works by Paul Delvaux and Yves Tanguy. The exhibition also features several works on paper by Pop Art icons Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselmann, as well as three lyrical watercolors by the Abstract Expressionist artist Sam Francis. A selection of seven drawings by Pablo Picasso ranging in date from 1905 to 1972, traces Picasso's career as a master draftsman. Picasso's extraordinary 1932 work on paper titled Le joueur de clarinette is inspired by Picasso's young mistress, Marie-Thérèse Walter and is an exhibition highlight. Picasso's association with Marie-Thérèse began in 1927 when she was still a teenager living with her mother. Many years later she told Life magazine, "I was seventeen years old. I was an innocent young girl. I knew nothing—neither of life or of Picasso. Nothing. I had gone to do some shopping at the Galeries Lafayette, and Picasso saw me leaving the Metro. He simply took me by the arm and said: 'I am Picasso! You and I are going to do great things together." In addition to their On Paper exhibition, Hammer Galleries will have a selection of major oil paintings by Picasso, Chagall, Legér and Miró on display as well as mobiles by Alexander Calder and sculpture by Jean Dubuffet. To celebrate the opening of their latest exhibition titled On Paper, Hammer Galleries has launched an interactive Virtual Tour which highlights the exhibition and their Park Avenue gallery space. Hammer Galleries' Virtual Tour simulates a real time viewing of their On Paper exhibition as it provides viewers with a 360 degree panoramic view of the gallery. With interactive capabilities, the tour gives the option to pan to different sections of the gallery and the ability to click on individual images of artworks. Full-screen shots of artworks with their corresponding details appear once artworks have been selected, allowing for their thorough examination. The Virtual Tour of On Paper is easily accessible on a computer, iPad or iPhone by clicking on the following link: http://vtg.virtualtourgallery.com/vtg-0137/#p=scene_view1

FILM SCREENINGS: RINEKE DIJKSTRA SELECTS - Guggenheim Museum
August 31, 2012 - Manhattan

On the occasion of Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective, the Guggenheim presents a short program of film and video works carefully assembled by the artist. This unique program includes Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore (1999), Mark Leckey's acclaimed short film portraying British nightlife from fragments of found video footage; Pierre Huyghe's Blanche-Neige Lucie (1997), a short film capturing the struggle of Lucie Dolene, who sued Disney to regain possession of the copyright to her own voice in the French dubbed version of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs; as well as Blind Kind (1964), Johan van der Keuken's documentary about a school for blind children in Amsterdam.

Lobby-for-the-Time-Being - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through September 01, 2012 - Bronx

Expanding on his playful, ongoing exploration of architecture, the Bronx-born conceptual artist Vito Acconci, in collaboration with a team of architects and media artists, has radically transformed the Bronx Museum North Wing Lobby through a series of interventions built with Corian. A smooth, hard material that is not quite translucent and not quite opaque, Corian© is used by the Acconci Studio as if it were a pliable soft fabric: cut open and slit into strips, pulled and stretched, pitted and gouged, rolled and curved, and braided and knotted, making it behave almost as if it were an organism. Through this series of operations, the slick material often associated with kitchen countertops is transformed into a lace-like surface on which images and shadows cast by the audience are projected.

...As Apple Pie - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through September 01, 2012 - New York

Images, like words, can trigger a cultural or emotional response to a shared national ethos. Artists have employed images-sometimes straightforwardly, often obliquely-in order to comment on a country, its people, its political or social goals, and its self-image. This exhibition explores this phenomenon through a rotating installation, drawn from the Whitney's collection, of works on paper by a diverse group of artists including William N. Copley, Edward Hopper, Jasper Johns, Elizabeth "Grandma" Layton, Willard Midgette, LeRoy Neiman, Joseph Pennell, Charles Ray, Jaune Quickto- See Smith, and Stow Wengenroth.

Action: Sex and the Moving Image - Museum of Sex
Through September 01, 2012 - New York

We live in a highly visual culture: we are presented with representational impressions and images hundreds, if not thousands, of times each day, often to the point of sensory overload. The impact of these visual images resonates in every facet of our lives, contributing to how we interact with and interpret the world around us; it shapes our opinions, creative output and desires. Images also clearly serve as a driving force behind our decisions about what to buy, what to believe, what to value, where to go and which people and relationships are worth our time and energy. The most widely=used, persuasive images of all are indisputably those pertaining to sex. Sexual and sensual imagery abounds in commercials, music videos, television shows, mainstream film and on the web. Ignoring the intriguing, suggestive and titillating influence of these images is nearly impossible...but, more importantly, why should we? Sex in and on film directly propelled the development of private video technology for the masses, including VCR and DVD players; and, within the past few decades the Internet has made sexual imagery more instantaneously-accessible than ever. No matter how much it is discussed, denounced and demonized, however, images of sex - in films, on television sets, on computer screens and now on mobile devices ? are an increasing everyday facet of modern culture. Sex, nudity, and even innuendo have always been highly contentious topics of public discourse and debate. In fact, throughout the history of the "moving image" legislation has not only dictated what filmmakers could legally create, but also mandated what people were "allowed" to see. Those deeming subject matter as obscene or immoral have edited, censored, banned and even destroyed films with sexual content. Action: Sex and the Moving Image surveys the controversial history of sex and the moving image over more than 150 years, featuring everything from the subtle sexual metaphors in mainstream films like Dracula (1931) to the unsimulated sex scenes in independently-funded films like Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971), from the "sexploitation" films of the 1950s to the "porno chic" era that made Deep Throat (1972) and Debbie Does Dallas (1978) legendary, from the emergence/acceptance of same-sex pornography to contemporary celebrity "home-made" porn such as One Night in Paris (2004). Using multiple screens and light-boxes, this exhibition exposes the most influential and provocative sexual images caught on cinematic camera.

F*ck Art - A Street Art Occupation - Museum of Sex
Through September 01, 2012 - New York

In response to the growing anti-institution sentiment pervasive in our culture, the Museum of Sex has engaged a group of 20 select street artists to occupy the third floor gallery at the Museum of Sex. Showcasing work that pushes the boundaries of our relationship to sexuality in public space, F*CK ART invites a dialogue around the power of visual provocation in the urban environment. This installation is a combination of existing pieces and site-specific works created for the run of the show.

Activist New York - Museum of the City of New York
Through September 01, 2012 - Upper East Side

Guest curator Steven Jaffe will lead a tour of the inaugural exhibition in the new Puffin Foundation Gallery. From the 17th century diary of John Bowne, which details his fight for religious freedom, to vintage footage of settlement house workers in the 1920s, to movies of residents in the South Bronx fihgting for housing in the 1970s, Dr. Jaffe will trace how citizens organizing to claim their human rights have shaped the destiny of the city.

Weegee: Murder Is My Business - International Center of Photography
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

For an intense decade between 1935 and 1946, Weegee (1899-1968) was one of the most relentlessly inventive figures in American photography. His graphically dramatic and often lurid photographs of New York crimes and news events set the standard for what has become known as tabloid journalism. Freelancing for a variety of New York newspapers and photo agencies, and later working as a stringer for the short-lived liberal daily PM (1940-48), Weegee established a way of combining photographs and texts that was distinctly different from that promoted by other picture magazines, such as LIFE. Utilizing other distribution venues, Weegee also wrote extensively (including his autobiographical Naked City, published in 1945) and organized his own exhibitions at the Photo League. This exhibition draws upon the extensive Weegee Archive at ICP and includes environmental recreations of Weegee's apartment and exhibitions. The exhibition is organized by ICP Chief Curator Brian Wallis.

BE SURE! BE SAFE! GET VACCINATED! Smallpox, Vaccination and Civil Liberties in New York - New-York Historical Society
Through September 02, 2012 - Upper West Side

The eradication of smallpox, variola major, from the world is one of the great triumphs of modern medicine. For centuries, this highly contagious, disfiguring lethal disease swept through communities, often killing nearly a quarter of its victims and leaving many of the rest blind and deeply scarred. There is still not any known cure for the disease, but the last naturally occurring case of smallpox in the world appeared in 1977. "Get Vaccinated!" -- part of a slogan from an incredibly successful 1947 campaign requesting voluntary vaccination (when five million New Yorkers were vaccinated in two weeks) -- traces the history of smallpox and efforts to manage it in the crowded environs of the nation's largest city. The exhibition begins with the use of inoculation (the introduction of matter from a pustule on the body of smallpox sufferer), in the eighteenth century, and George Washington's dramatic decision to inoculate his troops during the Revolutionary War, amid rumors that the British were intentionally infecting rebel populations. Themes emphasized in Get Vaccinated! include the history of vaccination itself, the painful conflict between the need to manage disease in an urban environment and the rights of individuals to resist government interference in their private lives, the growing effectiveness of public relations campaigns in promoting public health initiatives, bioterrorism and the political and economic impact of all epidemics in the city, including cholera, typhus, yellow fever, and AIDS.

Jubilation/Rumination: Life, Real and Imagined - American Folk Art Museum
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

Life is not lived in black and white: reality may have the tinge of dreams and dreams an air of reality. This provocative tension exists between the experiential nature of early American folk art and the fantastical imagery it often displays—between what is real and what is imagined. The same is true of the work of contemporary self-taught artists, which may introduce unique—and sometimes puzzling—expressions that illuminate the iconoclastic nature that is the flip side of the collective American psyche. The viewer is placed in the peculiar but exhilarating position of deciding for him- or herself whether the artwork expresses a disjuncture with reality or an uninhibited embracing of interior life. After all, what is more true, the picture that looks real or the picture that feels real; the observer or the observed? These perceptions shift as new scholarship emerges. Often, real-life roots are discovered for even arcane and esoteric imagery that has already influenced our response to an artist and his work: does this disappoint or satisfy the viewer? Diminish or enhance the creativity of the artist? One need only contemplate the culture- and memory-driven gestures of Martín Ramírez, the impressionistic nineteenth-century portraits by Dr. and Mrs. Shute, and minimalist mid-twentieth-century soot drawings by James Castle to render these distinctions immaterial. Instead the viewer is urged to enjoy the permeable fluidity between art and imagination, dream and belief. Stacy C. Hollander Senior Curator

Christer Stromholm: Les Amies de Place Blanche - International Center of Photography
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

Christer Stromholm (1918-2002) was one of the great photographers of the twentieth century, but he is little known outside of his native Sweden. This exhibition presents his most powerful and acclaimed body of work: Les Amies de la Place Blanche, a documentation of transsexual street hustlers in Paris in the 1960s. Arriving in Paris in the late 1950s, Stromholm settled in Place Blanche in the heart of the city's red-light district. There, he befriended and photographed young transsexuals struggling to live as women and to raise money for sex-change operations. Str?mholm's surprisingly intimate portraits and lush Brassa-like night scenes form a magnificent, dark, and at times quite moving photo album, a vibrant tribute to these girls, the "girlfriends of La Place Blanche." The photographs were first published in Sweden in 1983, and the book quickly sold out, becoming a cult classic; it is being reissued in French and English this year. Stromholm's photo-essay raises profound issues about sexuality and gender; as he wrote in 1983, "It was thenoand still is-about obtaining the freedom to choose one's own life and identity." This exhibition, the first presentation of Stromholm's work in an American museum, is organized by ICP Curatorial Assistant Pauline Vermare.

A Short History of Photography: From the ICP Collection Honoring Willis E. Hartshorn, Ehrenkranz Director - International Center of Photography
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

In honor of its Ehrenkranz Director Willis Hartshorn, the International Center of Photography presents an engaging survey of its vast and unique collection of photographs. Founded in 1975, as part of the original concept for the Center, the photograph collection at ICP now contains well over 100,000 photographs, ranging from the 1840s to the present. This provocative selection by ICP Chief Curator Brian Wallis is an investigation of the aesthetics and uses of photographic images, and includes well-loved classics as well as little-known works by anonymous photographers. One of the hallmarks of the collection is a focus on alternative histories of photography, including marginalized social practices of photography as well as popular and nonart approaches to the medium. Eugene Atget, W. Eugene Smith, Cindy Sherman, Walker Evans, and Andre Kertesz are among the photographers included in this wide-ranging exhibition.

President in Petticoats! Civil War Propaganda in Photographs - International Center of Photography
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

As the American Civil War ground to a dispiriting and unheroic end after the surrender of General Robert E. Lee's rebel forces and the shocking assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in mid-April 1865, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, became a political fugitive. At dawn on May 10, 1865, a contingent of Michigan cavalry captured Davis in a makeshift camp outside Irwinville, Georgia. In his haste to flee, Davis grabbed his wife's overcoat rather than his own. News reports immediately circulated that Davis had been apprehended in women's clothes and that he was attempting to disguise himself as a woman. Northern artists and caricaturists seized upon these rumors of cowardly escape and created wildly inventive images, some using photomontage, to sensationalize the political story. Photographers circulated and even pirated dozens of fanciful photographic cards; many used a photographic portrait of Davis on a hand-drawn body in a woman's dress, hat, and crinoline, but wearing his own boots, the detail that supposedly betrayed him to his captors. The exhibition is organized by Assistant Curator of Collections Erin Barnett.

Beer Here: Brewing New York's History - New-York Historical Society
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

To consider the fascinating yet largely anonymous legacy of beer brewing in New York City, the New-York Historical Society presents Beer Here: Brewing New York's History. This exhibit surveys the social, economic, political, and technological history of the production and consumption of beer, ale, and porter in the city from the seventeenth century to the present. In the past three decades, New York City has become an important center of craft and home beer brewing. While this phenomenon began only after President Jimmy Carter signed into law an act that legalized home-brewing, the growth of New York's present beer industry also marks the resurgence of a long-standing tradition known to few outside the world of beer aficionados. Beer has been brewed in New York City and State since the days of its earliest European settlement, when it was a vital source of nourishment and tax revenues. Brewing continued locally and statewide throughout the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and for much of the nineteenth century New York State was home to one of the country's largest brewing industries. Early nineteenth-century development of New York State's hop farming industry was vital to this growth, and from the 1840s through the 1880s the state was the largest producer of hops in the United States. Exhibit sections explore such topics as: the nutritional properties of colonial beer and early New York brewers in the age of revolution; infrastructure innovations and the importance of access to clean water; large-scale brewing in nineteenth-century New York and the influence of immigration; the influence of temperance and impact of prohibition; bottling, canning, refrigeration and other technological advances; and the state of the city's breweries in the age of mass production. Featured artifacts and documents include: a 1779 account book from a New York City brewer who sold beer and ale to both the British and patriot sides; sections of early nineteenth-century wooden pipes from one of the city's first water systems; a bronze medal that commemorates an 1855 New York State temperance law; beer trays from a variety of late nineteenth-century brewers; sign from the campaign to repeal prohibition; and a selection of advertisements from Piels, Rheingold and Schaefer, beloved hometown brewers. The exhibit concludes with a beer hall that features a selection of favorite New York City and State artisanal beers. The beer hall hours are: Tuesday-Thursday and Saturdays: 2pm-6pm Fridays: 2pm-8pm Sundays: 2pm-5pm

Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 03, 2012 - Midtown

This exhibition is the U.S. premiere of Taryn Simon's (b. 1975, New York) photographic project A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII. The work was produced over a four-year period (2008-11), during which the artist travelled around the world researching and documenting bloodlines and their related stories. In each of the 18 "chapters" that make up the work, external forces of territory, power, circumstance, or religion collide with the internal forces of psychological and physical inheritance. The subjects Simon documents include victims of genocide in Bosnia, test rabbits infected with a lethal disease in Australia, the first woman to hijack an aircraft, and the living dead in India. Her collection is at once cohesive and arbitrary, mapping the relationships among chance, blood, and other components of fate. Simon's project is divided into 18 chapters, nine of which will be presented at MoMA. Each chapter is comprised of three segments: one of a large portrait series depicting bloodline members (portrait panel); a second featuring text (annotation panel); and a third containing photographic evidence (footnote panel). A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII exploits photography's capacity to at once probe complex narratives in contemporary politics and organize this material according to classification processes characteristic of the archive, a system that connects identity, lineage, history, and memory.

Bellini, Titian, and Lotto North Italian Paintings from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 03, 2012 -

The Accademia Carrara, Bergamo, is a jewel among Italian museums and a haven for art lovers. Founded at the end of the eighteenth century by Count Giacomo Carrara and housed in a beautiful Neoclassical building, it contains a range of masterpieces dating from the fourteenth to the nineteenth century. At its core is a group of outstanding pictures from the Renaissance. Because of closure for restoration, it has been possible for the museum to lend to The Metropolitan Museum of Art fifteen masterpieces by Venetian and north Italian painters of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, including works by Bellini, Titian, and Lorenzo Lotto.

Ellsworth Kelly Plant Drawings - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 03, 2012 -

One of the foremost artists of our day, Ellsworth Kelly (American, b. 1923) may be best known for his rigorous abstract painting, but he has made figurative drawings throughout his career, creating an extraordinary body of work that now spans six decades. There has never been a major museum exhibition dedicated exclusively to the plant drawings. The selection of approximately eighty drawings begins in 1948 during Kelly's early sojourn in Paris and continues throughout his travels to his most recent work made in upstate New York.

Exhibition of Works by Dürer and Other Masters in Central European Draftsmanship 1400-1700 - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 03, 2012 -

Dürer and Beyond: Central European Drawings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1400-1700 presents a selection of 100 works from the Museum's outstanding holdings of German, Swiss, Austrian, and early Bohemian drawings. Works by later 16th– and 17th–century artists are balanced by a group of drawings from the early 16th century, including an exceptional double-sided self-portrait by Albrecht Dürer. In addition to drawings by other major artists such as Martin Schongauer, Albrecht Altdorfer, Urs Graf, Hans Holbein the Elder, Joseph Heintz the Elder, Wenzel Hollar, and Joachim von Sandrart the Elder, the exhibition highlights works by lesser-known, but equally fascinating, draftsmen of the 15th to 17th century. The selection of drawings in the exhibition is enhanced by comparative material, including prints, illustrated books, paintings, glass roundels, and decorative objects also from the Museum's collection, as well as by loans from the Pierpont Morgan Library and private collections. The exhibition will be featured on the Museum's website at www.metmuseum.org.

Illuminated - The Rubin Museum
Through September 03, 2012 - New York

Gold, silver, and other precious materials were often used to adorn objects of religious devotion, especially the sacred books of the living traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Christianity, and Islam. Materials used to produce them have always been of the best quality worthy of sacred texts, and their effectiveness often rested on the measure of their lavish production. Specifically, the exhibition Illuminated: The Art of Sacred Books explores the aesthetic and technological approaches used in creating and adorning sacred books from a variety of cultures and presents Tibetan sacred books in a broad cross-cultural context. Among featured objects are several never before displayed illuminated Tibetan manuscript pages and complete books dating as early as the 13th century written in gold and silver on dark blue and black paper of various sizes in the traditional Tibetan book format. Through an in-depth examination of the comparable attitudes found in the presented objects, the exhibition provides new insights into what is known as the culture of the book. Other highlights from the exhibition include a bifolio of the famous "Blue Qur'an," written in gold on indigo colored velum in Tunisia between the 9th and 10th centuries; a Japanese Buddhist Sutra scroll written in gold on indigo paper in 1720; medieval Gospels written in gold letters on blue and purple parchment; illuminated pages of Jain Sutras; and illustrated Indian Hindu classics. In addition to these various lavishly decorated books of different faiths, created in diverse formats and materials, the exhibition also includes adorned book covers that are painted, carved from wood, and made of leather or silver repouss� as well as other objects, designated as sacred and recognized for their value as both art and devotional objects.

New Practices New York 2012 - Center for Architecture
Through September 08, 2012 -

New Practices New York, a biennial competition since 2006, serves as the preeminent platform in New York City to recognize and promote new and innovative architecture and design firms. The juried portfolio competition is sponsored by the New Practices Committee of the AIA New York Chapter and honors firms that have utilized unique and innovative strategies, both for the projects they undertake and for the practices they have established. Seven promising and pioneering new architecture and design firms working in New York were chosen as the New Practices New York 2012 competition winners. To qualify for the competition, practices had to be founded since 2006 and be located within the five boroughs of New York City. This is the second year that the New Practices New York competition has been open to multidisciplinary firms, widening the field of entrants to designers and young professionals in the process of becoming licensed architects. The distinguished panel of jurors selected the competition's winners from fifty-one entries. The New Practices New York 2012 competition winners are: ABRUZZO BODZIAK ARCHITECTS; Christian Wassmann; formlessfinder; HOLLER architecture; The Living; MARC FORNES & THEVERYMANY; and SLO Architecture.

Naked before the Camera - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 09, 2012 -

Since the beginning of art and in every medium, depicting the human body has been among the artist's greatest challenges and supreme achievements, as can so easily be seen by Museum visitors walking through the galleries of Greek and Roman statuary, African and Oceanic art, Old Master paintings, or Indian sculpture. Tapping veins of mythology, carnal desire, hero worship, and aesthetic pleasure, depictions of the nude have also triggered impassioned discussions of sin and sexuality, cultural identity, and canons of beauty. Controversies are often aroused even more intensely when the artist's chosen medium is photography, with its accuracy and specificity -- when a real person stood naked before the camera -- rather than traditional media where more generalized and idealized forms prevail. In the medium's early days -- particularly in France, where Victorian notions of propriety held less sway than in England and America, and where life drawing was a central part of artistic training -- photographs proved to be a cheap and easy substitute for the live model. While serving painters and sculptors, many nineteenth-century photographic nudes were also intended as works of art in their own right. Still others bore the title "artist's study" merely to evade government censors and legitimize images that were, in fact, more likely intended to stir a gentleman's loins than to enhance his aesthetic endeavors. Outside the realms of art and erotica, photographic nudes were made to aid the study of anatomy, movement, forensics, and ethnography. In twentieth-century art, the body became a vehicle for surreal and modernist manipulation and for intimate odes to beauty or poems to a muse. Beginning with the sexual revolution of the 1960s, nudity and its representation took on new meanings -- as declarations of freedom from societal strictures, as assertions of individual identity, as explorations of sexuality and gender roles, and as responses to AIDS. Naked before the Camera surveys the history of this subject and examines some of the motivations and meanings that underlie its expression.

Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently - New Museum
Through September 09, 2012 - New York

"Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently" is a multipart project that explores the idea of sexual and gender "difference" after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics. Through an exhibition, series of events, and an opening symposium, the project seeks to invigorate discussion around a queer "We" that looks beyond tolerance or assimilation toward a concept of equality that provides for greater personal freedom. The project draws from Motta's evolving database documentary wewhofeeldifferently.info, which proposes "difference" as a profound mode of possibility for both solidarity and self-determination.

Sharon Hayes: There's So Much I Want to Say to You - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through September 09, 2012 - New York

Sharon Hayes (b. 1970) is a New York–based artist whose work in photography, film, video, sound, and performance examines the nexus between politics, history, speech, and desire. This exhibition, conceived by Hayes for the Whitney's third floor galleries, brings together existing pieces and newly commissioned works, all of which articulate forms of what Hayes calls "speech acts." The works are presented within an environment designed by Hayes in collaboration with artist Andrea Geyer.

Ellsworth Kelly: Sculpture - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 09, 2012 -

As part of its summer program of sculpture exhibitions in the Gilbert Court, the Morgan will present three major sculptures by renowned abstract artist Ellsworth Kelly. Spare and elegant, Kelly's free-standing totemic forms -- one in bronze, the other two in mahogany and redwood -- exude the same quiet and spectacular beauty as his better-known, brightly colored paintings. The exhibition will also include a group of models and drawings that reveal the artist's process.

Raw Cooked: Ulrike Muller - Brooklyn Museum
Through September 09, 2012 -

The fifth exhibition in the Raw/Cooked series presents the work of Sunset Park-based artist Ulrike Muller. With the goal of starting a conversation on the lesbian feminist movement and examining the visibility of queer bodies within mainstream culture and the Museum, Muller orchestrated a collaborative drawing project based on the inventory list of the feminist T-shirt collection at the Lesbian Herstory Archives in Park Slope, Brooklyn. She distributed textual T-shirt descriptions to feminists, queer artists, and other interested New Yorkers, and asked that they translate these texts into new images. Her exhibition includes one hundred drawings from this project. Additionally, she used symbolic lesbian, feminist, and queer terms from the inventory as search criteria to mine the Museum's online collection. Through the display of approximately one hundred of the collaborative drawings and nearly twenty-five Museum collection objects in the Luce Center for American Art's Elevator Lobby and elsewhere in the Museum, Muller creates a visual dialogue among contemporary queer culture, the Museum, and the history of feminist activism. Muller graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna. She was recommended for Raw/Cooked by advisory board member Amy Sillman. Raw/Cooked is organized by Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum.

Highlights from the Collection - Noguchi Museum
Through September 09, 2012 - Queens

Complimenting the Noguchi Museum's permanently installed lower levels, selections from the Museum's Collections, including examples of Noguchi's steel sculptures and a number of collaborative stage sets, are now on view in the upstairs galleries.

Printers, Monks, & Craftsmen - Bookmaking in the Age of Gutenberg - Museum of Biblical Art
Through September 09, 2012 - New York

This exhibition looks at the transitional period in hand press bookmaking through 14 Bibles printed between 1455 and 1525. Early printed books initially looked to manuscripts to inform page design, typeface, binding, and decorative embellishment. As the era progressed, printers and other craftsmen involved in the production of a printed volume began to experiment with the possibilities handpress production afforded to create innovative, elegant books. Focusing on Gothic bindings and the structure of a selection of books drawn from the Rare Bible Collection @ MOBIA, conservator Clare Manias explores regional differences in the volumes' styles, production, and form illustrating that printed books have stories to tell and are much more than what's between the covers.

The Adoration of the Magi by Bartolo di Fredi - A Masterpiece Reconstructed - Museum of Biblical Art
Through September 09, 2012 - New York

Illustrating one of the most celebrated Renaissance themes, Bartolo di Fredi's (c. 1330-1410) Adoration of the Magi will be reunited in this groundbreaking exhibition. The three known surviving panels of this Siense master's unrivaled altarpiece are considered by many to be among Bartolo's finest works. Composed of a monumental central panel depicting a tender visit of the Magi to the Christ Child, his Crucifixion and the mourning it brings, "Adoration of the Magi" by Bartolo di Fredi: A Masterpiece Reconstructed permits an in-depth study of this oft-depicted Christian narrative. The three altarpiece panels will be on loan from the Pinacoteca of Siena, the Lindenau-Museum in Altenburg Germany, and the University of Virginia Art Museum, the first venue for the exhibition. At the Museum of Biblical Art, Bartolo's altarpiece will be displayed alongside a magnificent version of the Adoration of the Magi which he completed as a standalone work in c. 1390, on loan from The Robert Lehman Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as Bartolo's depiction of the Adoration of the Shepherds dating to c. 1374, on loan from The Cloisters. Both paintings will enhance the detailed examination of this master's grand altarpiece.

Making American Taste: Narrative Art for a New Democracy - New-York Historical Society
Through September 09, 2012 - New York

Making American Taste features fifty-five works from the New-York Historical Society's collection that cast new light on both the history of American art and the formation of American cultural ideals during a crucial period from the 1830s to the late 1860s. By integrating history, literary and religious subjects with now better-known examples of rural and domestic genre, the exhibition explores the broad range of styles and narrative themes that appealed to nineteenth-century Americans seeking cultural refinement.

Art of Another Kind: International Abstraction and the Guggenheim, 1949-1960 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through September 12, 2012 - New York

Pioneering artists in the post-World War II era alternatively embraced artistic freedom and gesture-based styles, nontraditional materials and counter-cultural references. Featuring nearly 100 works by Louise Bourgeois, Alberto Burri, Asger Jorn, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Pierre Soulages, Antoni Tàpies, and Zao Wou-Ki, among others, this collection-based exhibition explores the affinities and differences between artists working continents apart in a period of great transition and rapid creative development.

ReDraw - The Capital Plan for 35 Wooster St - The Drawing Center
Through September 13, 2012 - New York

In December 2010, The Drawing Center launched ReDraw: The Capital Plan for 35 Wooster Street with the purchase of a 2,000-square-foot unit on the second floor of 35 Wooster Street, which will replace its leased space at 40 Wooster Street. Plans for the new space have been designed by Claire Weisz and WXY Architecture + Urban Design, an internationally-recognized New York–based firm. ReDraw's architectural program addresses specific exhibition, educational, and operational requirements, reinforcing The Drawing Center's mission to present the highest-quality cultural programming in galleries proportioned to facilitate a meaningful viewer experience—attributes that have made the institution one of the most respected, beloved, and distinctive non-profits in New York City. The building project will connect the existing ground floor space to the newly-acquired second floor space and the lower level of the building. A new bookstore and a sky-lit Drawing Room gallery will join the existing visitor services desk and Main Gallery on the ground floor level. Offices and administrative spaces will move to the second floor, and the renovated lower level will accommodate a new education room, a Viewing Program meeting room, and the experimental Lab gallery, which will feature an audio and video media system for exhibitions and public programs. Integrating these spaces into one building will provide The Drawing Center with 50% more contiguous programmatic space. The Drawing Center has suspended on-site programming as construction takes place.

Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 - The Jewish Museum
Through September 23, 2012 -

This exhibition features key works in various media by Edouard Vuillard, the twentieth-century master whose unique blend of tradition and modernity evokes the refined and sophisticated society of his patrons, many of whom were Jewish.

Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York - New-York Historical Society
Through September 23, 2012 - Upper West Side

The New-York Historical Society will present Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York, an exhibition highlighting the histories of 150 notable examples of silver from its collection. Made across the span of four centuries, the objects in the exhibition tell a diversity of stories: many speak to individual accomplishment and family pride, while a few have unsettling ties or backgrounds. The silver, ranging from simple spoons to extravagant trophies, culled from a trove of over 3,000 objects, includes powerful eyewitness artifacts linked to significant moments in the history of New York and the United States.

Churchill: The Power of Words - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 23, 2012 -

Sir Winston Churchill's impact upon the twentieth century is difficult to overestimate. A master orator and writer, Churchill's use of spoken and written words will be explored in this exhibition that covers more than a half century of his life?from Victorian childhood letters to his parents, to Cold War correspondence with President Eisenhower, and featuring some of his most famous wartime oratory. Drawn from the Churchill Archives Centre, Cambridge, the presentation uses drafts, speaking notes, personal and official correspondence, public statements, and recordings from some of his most compelling speeches and broadcasts as lenses to examine the main events in Churchill's life. Of particular focus will be Churchill's lifelong relationship with the United States, homeland of his Brooklyn-born mother, from first visit in 1895 to award of Honorary Citizenship in 1963; and the ways in which he used the written and spoken word to develop, complement and advance his political career.

Renaissance Venice: Drawings from the Morgan - Morgan Library and Museum
Through September 23, 2012 - New York

Featuring some seventy masterpieces of drawings, books, maps, and letters from the Morgan's rich holdings, the exhibition Renaissance Venice: Drawings from the Morgan chronicles the artistic production of the city of Venice and its territories during the republic's Golden Age, the sixteenth century. The exhibition features striking examples by great masters of the period, including Paris Bordone, Vittore Carpaccio, Lorenzo Lotto, Jacopo Tintoretto, Titian, and Paolo Veronese. Offering compelling insights into contemporary art, religion, and culture, Renaissance Venice addresses topics such as the portrait in Venetian art, Venice and the landscape tradition, religious and civic life, artistic innovations in printmaking and drawing, book publishing and cartography, and the role of foreign artists in the city. This is the first presentation and study of these drawings as a group and the first show in the United States on this theme.

Space, Light, Structure - The Jewelry of Margaret de Patta - Museum of Arts & Design
Through September 23, 2012 -

SPACE-LIGHT-STRUCTURE: THE JEWELRY OF MARGARET DE PATTA is the first comprehensive retrospective of the life and work of Margaret De Patta (1903-1964), a pioneer in American studio jewelry whose modernist creations remain as fresh and vital today as when they were initially conceived in the mid-twentieth century. Featuring De Patta's most spectacular brooches, pendants, and rings, Space, Light, Structure explores the major contributions of this groundbreaking San Francisco artist and sheds new light on her radical design philosophy. In 1939, De Patta began her search for new techniques that would allow her to take advantage of the inherent refractory properties of transparent and semi-transparent crystals. Her innovative "opticuts" revolutionized contemporary jewelry by transforming stones into brilliant, transparent spatial objects that, to this day, remain unsurpassed in concept, form, and execution. Growing out of her passion for modern architecture-and signaling a radical departure from the conventional perception of jewelry as mere body ornament- the compositions of her "wearable miniature sculptures" exhibit a dynamic equilibrium in which cantilevered, linear elements are counter-balanced against more compact, denser forms. The exhibition also illuminates the critical influence of De Patta's mentor, L�szl� Moholy-Nagy, the renowned artist with whom she studied in 1941-42. The Constructivist concepts championed by this former Bauhaus master and co-founder of the Chicago Bauhaus are manifest in De Patta's manipulation of space and light as well as through her incorporation of kinetic elements, space-defining steel screens, "opticut" rutilated crystals, and "floating" tension-mounted stones. Several equilibrium studies and photograms by Moholy-Nagy will underscore the enduring formal strength and visual excitement of the jewelry De Patta produced following the tenets she absorbed from him. Important works by other leading international protagonists of Constructivism, including El Lissitzky Alexander Archipenko, and Gy�rgy Kepes, will also be included in order to contextualize De Patta and her work. Drawn from important museum, gallery, and private collections in the United States and Canada, as well as from the De Patta Archives in California, the exhibition also presents never-before-shown examples of the artist's flatware, ceramics, and designs for interior spaces, in addition to travel diaries of her trips to Mexico, Japan, and the 1939 New York World's Fair.

Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York - New-York Historical Society
Through September 23, 2012 - New York

Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York, highlights the histories of 150 notable

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