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Things to do this week in NYC Jan 21-Jan 28: Cultural Arts
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January 21, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

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Dance, art galleries, museums, lectures -- you name it, there are plenty of things to do in NYC. From the New York City Ballet, to Alvin Ailey, from performances at the Metropolitan Opera, to live music at Madison Square Garden, New York has it all. Here is a selection of what's going on in New York this week.

The Concert (or The Perils of Everybody) - Joyce Theater
January 21, 2012 -

Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) was born in Poland. He was one of the most important innovators for the piano, both in terms of composition and playing style. As a pianist he was mostly self-taught, and since he did not like to give public performances, his substantial reputation was based on a very few concerts. Chopin influenced future composers, especially those of the French and Russian schools. The musical level he attained made possible future piano innovations, such as those of Debussy. Other Chopin ballets choreographed by Jerome Robbins are Dances at a Gathering (1969), In the Night (1970), and Other Dances (1976).

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
January 21, 2012 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

The Steadfast Tin Soldier - New York City Ballet
January 21, 2012 -

The Steadfast Tin Soldier, based loosely on a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale, focuses on the wistful courtship and love between a tin soldier and a paper-doll ballerina. The work was commissioned by the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. The present pas de deux stems from a 1955 collaboration in which Balanchine, Francisco Moncion, and Barbara Milberg choreographed all of Bizet's Jeux d'Enfants. Both the context and the woman's variation of The Steadfast Tin Soldier were derived from this earlier work. The soldier's variation was restaged for the new pas de deux. Georges Bizet (1838-1875) is best known for Carmen, one of the most successful operas ever written. However, he had more success in his lifetime with non-operatic works. He was an excellent pianist, and wrote many pieces for that instrument, including Jeux d'Enfants. Many of the operas Bizet wrote, with the exceptions of Carmen and The Pearl Fishers, were destroyed by the composer or never finished.

Le Tombeau de Couperin - New York City Ballet
January 21, 2012 -

In this suite of dances in 18th-century courtly style, eight couples are divided into left and right quadrilles. (A quadrille is an 18th-century dance form originating with squadrons at tournaments; it is also referred to as a square dance.) The dancers form geometric patterns — diagonals, diamonds, squares — and dance in unison as well as mimicking the movements of the opposing quadrille. Tombeau means "memorial" or "tomb." In 1919 Ravel composed a commemorative suite for piano in six movements (prelude, fugue, forlane, minuet, rigaudon, and toccato) in memory of six friends who died in World War I. In 1920 the composer orchestrated the piece, eliminating the fugue and the toccato. Ravel honors 18th-century French music in general and the French Baroque composer François Couperin in particular; Couperin was court musician and composer to Louis XIV, the Sun King. Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) was born in the French Basque town of Ciboure. His family moved to Paris and encouraged him to take piano lessons. At fourteen he was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied with Fauré, who became his principal teacher of composition. His ballet scores include Pavane pour une Infante Défunte, Jeux d'Eau, Bolero, Daphnis and Chloé, Ma Mère L'Oye, and L'Enfant et les Sortilèges, a ballet-opera.

Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux - New York City Ballet
January 21, 2012 -

An eight-minute display of ballet bravura and technique, Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux uses music that the composer belatedly created for Act III of Swan Lake. It was hurriedly composed for Anna Sobeshchanskaya, a Bolshoi prima ballerina who was scheduled to make her debut in the title role at the fourth performance of the 1877 Moscow production, and sought to enrich the part of Odile. Because the music was not in the original score, it was not published with the rest of Swan Lake, and disappeared for more than half a century. When it was discovered in the Bolshoi Theater archives in 1953, Balanchine sought — and was granted — permission to use it for his own choreography.

Union Jack - New York City Ballet
January 21, 2012 -

Union Jack was created to honor the British heritage of the United States on the occasion of its Bicentennial. Part I is based on Scottish military tattoos and folk-dance forms performed in an open castle square. Part II is a music-hall pas de deux for the costermonger Pearly King and Queen of London, with two little girls and a donkey, danced before a drop suggesting Pollock's toy theaters. Part III is a series of variations employing hornpipes, sea songs, work chants, jigs, and drill orders of the Royal Navy, in a dockside setting. For the finale, hand flags signal 'God Save the Queen' in semaphore code as the Union Jack unfurls. Hershy Kay (1919-1981) established himself as a preeminent orchestrator of musicals with Leonard Bernstein's On The Town in 1944. His works for the ballet include Cakewalk, Clowns, Western Symphony, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?, and Union Jack; his works for the musical theater include Peter Pan, Once Upon a Mattress, Candide, A Chorus Line, Evita and Barnum. A composer in his own right, Hershy Kay also reconstructed Louis Moreau Gottschalk's Grande Tarantelle for Piano and Orchestra, which later became the Balanchine ballet Tarantella. Mr. Kay's work also includes a children's record, Mother Goose.

Parsons Dance - Joyce Theater
Through January 22, 2012 -

"One of the great movers of modern dance" (The New York Times) and "one of modern dance's great living dance-makers" (New York Magazine), David Parsons brings his company back to The Joyce with a program that includes one world premiere and two programs filled with selections from the company's repertory of more than 70 Parsons works. The programs will feature an assortment of audience favorites, including Swing Shift, with music by Kenji Bunch, and Touched by Time, with music by John Corigliano and costume design by Donna Karan. All programs will include David's stroboscopic masterwork, Caught.

Union Jack - New York City Ballet
January 22, 2012 -

Union Jack was created to honor the British heritage of the United States on the occasion of its Bicentennial. Part I is based on Scottish military tattoos and folk-dance forms performed in an open castle square. Part II is a music-hall pas de deux for the costermonger Pearly King and Queen of London, with two little girls and a donkey, danced before a drop suggesting Pollock's toy theaters. Part III is a series of variations employing hornpipes, sea songs, work chants, jigs, and drill orders of the Royal Navy, in a dockside setting. For the finale, hand flags signal 'God Save the Queen' in semaphore code as the Union Jack unfurls. Hershy Kay (1919-1981) established himself as a preeminent orchestrator of musicals with Leonard Bernstein's On The Town in 1944. His works for the ballet include Cakewalk, Clowns, Western Symphony, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?, and Union Jack; his works for the musical theater include Peter Pan, Once Upon a Mattress, Candide, A Chorus Line, Evita and Barnum. A composer in his own right, Hershy Kay also reconstructed Louis Moreau Gottschalk's Grande Tarantelle for Piano and Orchestra, which later became the Balanchine ballet Tarantella. Mr. Kay's work also includes a children's record, Mother Goose.

Who Cares? - New York City Ballet
January 22, 2012 -

In 1937, George Gershwin asked Balanchine to come to Hollywood to work with him on Samuel Goldwyn's "Follies." Tragically, Gershwin was felled by a brain tumor before he completed the ballet music for the film. Thirty-three years later, Balanchine choreographed Who Cares? to 16 songs Gershwin composed between 1924 and 1931, including "I Got Rhythm," "The Man I Love," "Embraceable You," and "My One and Only." Kay's orchestrations draw extensively on Gershwin's own piano arrangements of his songs. Balanchine used the songs not to evoke any particular era but as a way to portray an exuberance that is both broadly American and charged with the distinctive energy of Manhattan.

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
January 24, 2012 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

Union Jack - New York City Ballet
January 24, 2012 -

Union Jack was created to honor the British heritage of the United States on the occasion of its Bicentennial. Part I is based on Scottish military tattoos and folk-dance forms performed in an open castle square. Part II is a music-hall pas de deux for the costermonger Pearly King and Queen of London, with two little girls and a donkey, danced before a drop suggesting Pollock's toy theaters. Part III is a series of variations employing hornpipes, sea songs, work chants, jigs, and drill orders of the Royal Navy, in a dockside setting. For the finale, hand flags signal 'God Save the Queen' in semaphore code as the Union Jack unfurls. Hershy Kay (1919-1981) established himself as a preeminent orchestrator of musicals with Leonard Bernstein's On The Town in 1944. His works for the ballet include Cakewalk, Clowns, Western Symphony, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?, and Union Jack; his works for the musical theater include Peter Pan, Once Upon a Mattress, Candide, A Chorus Line, Evita and Barnum. A composer in his own right, Hershy Kay also reconstructed Louis Moreau Gottschalk's Grande Tarantelle for Piano and Orchestra, which later became the Balanchine ballet Tarantella. Mr. Kay's work also includes a children's record, Mother Goose.

The Concert (or The Perils of Everybody) - Joyce Theater
January 25, 2012 -

Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) was born in Poland. He was one of the most important innovators for the piano, both in terms of composition and playing style. As a pianist he was mostly self-taught, and since he did not like to give public performances, his substantial reputation was based on a very few concerts. Chopin influenced future composers, especially those of the French and Russian schools. The musical level he attained made possible future piano innovations, such as those of Debussy. Other Chopin ballets choreographed by Jerome Robbins are Dances at a Gathering (1969), In the Night (1970), and Other Dances (1976).

In G Major - New York City Ballet
January 25, 2012 -

Ravel composed the Concerto in G Major after a trip to the United States. It has been seen as a reflection on Gershwin and American musical comedy. Ravel described the work as "... written in very much the same spirit as those of Mozart and Saint-Saëns," and that "it uses certain effects borrowed from jazz, but only in moderation." (Arbie Orenstein, Ravel: Man and Musician.) When the Paris Opera Ballet staged In G Major, under the name "En Sol," it commissioned scenery and costumes by Erté, which were borrowed by New York City Ballet. Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) was born in the French Basque town of Ciboure. His family moved to Paris and encouraged him to take piano lessons. At fourteen he was admitted to the Paris Conservatory, where he studied with Fauré, who became his principal teacher of composition. His ballet scores include Pavane pour une Infante Défunte, Jeux d'Eau, Boléro, Daphnis and Chloe, Ma Mère L'Oye, and L'enfant et les Sortiléges, a ballet-opera.

In Memory of... - New York City Ballet
January 25, 2012 -

Louis Krasner, an American violinist, commissioned a violin concerto from Alban Berg in early 1935. Berg, absorbed in the orchestration of his opera, Lulu, did no work on it until the death, from polio, of 18-year-old Manon Gropius. Her parents, Alma Mahler (composer Gustav Mahler's widow) and Walter Gropius were Berg's close friends. The concerto uses melodic themes from Mahler and a Carpathian folk song, and concludes with a treatment of J. S. Bach's cantata, O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort. Alban Berg (1885-1935), an Austrian, had little formal musical training before beginning his studies with the musical innovator Arnold Schoenberg in 1904. Berg, Schoenberg, and Berg's student Anton Webern formed the Second Viennese School. They were the originators of serialism: the 12-tone row of atonal music. Berg is most famous for his two operas, Wozzeck and Lulu. His writing, dense, dissonant and full of personal allusions and complex devices, was well regarded critically, but won little popular acceptance during his life.

Donizetti Variations - New York City Ballet
January 26, 2012 -

This ballet was created for "Salute to Italy," a New York City Ballet program celebrating the 100th anniversary of Italy's unification. Balanchine felt he needed a "cheerful and sunny work" to offset the more somber tone of the other ballets on the program, which included La Sonnambula.

Firebird - New York City Ballet
January 26, 2012 -

Balanchine's Firebird was one of the choreographer's first creations for the young New York City Ballet, using elaborate sets and costumes. The story, the choreography, the sets, and the music all integrated many brilliantly colored elements from Russian folklore. Because Balanchine chose to use the orchestral suite rather than the complete three-act score, he simplified the story and emphasized the mythical elements of the Firebird's character. For revivals in 1970, 1972, and 1980, Balanchine changed his choreography for the Firebird — and sometimes the costume as well — to suit the ballerina cast in the leading role. At Balanchine's invitation, in 1970, the artist Marc Chagall came to New York City to supervise the construction of new sets and costumes based on his designs for a new production. For the 1970 revival, Robbins contributed new choreography for the monsters' dance. The current production was staged in 1985. Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), born in Russia, is acknowledged as one of the great composers of the twentieth century. His work encompassed styles as diverse as Romanticism, Neoclassicism and Serialism. His ballets for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes included The Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Apollo. His music has been used in over thirty ballets originating with New York City Ballet from 1948 through 1987, including Danses Concertantes, Orpheus, The Cage, Agon, Monumentum pro Gesualdo, Rubies, Symphony in Three Movements, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Concerto for Two Solo Pianos, Suite from L'Histoire du Soldat, Concertino, and Jeu de Cartes.

In G Major - New York City Ballet
January 26, 2012 -

Ravel composed the Concerto in G Major after a trip to the United States. It has been seen as a reflection on Gershwin and American musical comedy. Ravel described the work as "... written in very much the same spirit as those of Mozart and Saint-Saëns," and that "it uses certain effects borrowed from jazz, but only in moderation." (Arbie Orenstein, Ravel: Man and Musician.) When the Paris Opera Ballet staged In G Major, under the name "En Sol," it commissioned scenery and costumes by Erté, which were borrowed by New York City Ballet. Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) was born in the French Basque town of Ciboure. His family moved to Paris and encouraged him to take piano lessons. At fourteen he was admitted to the Paris Conservatory, where he studied with Fauré, who became his principal teacher of composition. His ballet scores include Pavane pour une Infante Défunte, Jeux d'Eau, Boléro, Daphnis and Chloe, Ma Mère L'Oye, and L'enfant et les Sortiléges, a ballet-opera.

In G Major - New York City Ballet
January 27, 2012 -

Ravel composed the Concerto in G Major after a trip to the United States. It has been seen as a reflection on Gershwin and American musical comedy. Ravel described the work as "... written in very much the same spirit as those of Mozart and Saint-Saëns," and that "it uses certain effects borrowed from jazz, but only in moderation." (Arbie Orenstein, Ravel: Man and Musician.) When the Paris Opera Ballet staged In G Major, under the name "En Sol," it commissioned scenery and costumes by Erté, which were borrowed by New York City Ballet. Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) was born in the French Basque town of Ciboure. His family moved to Paris and encouraged him to take piano lessons. At fourteen he was admitted to the Paris Conservatory, where he studied with Fauré, who became his principal teacher of composition. His ballet scores include Pavane pour une Infante Défunte, Jeux d'Eau, Boléro, Daphnis and Chloe, Ma Mère L'Oye, and L'enfant et les Sortiléges, a ballet-opera.

Ocean's Kingdom - New York City Ballet
January 27, 2012 -

NYCB brings together the legendary Sir Paul McCartney and Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins for a hallmark collaboration. Ocean's Kingdom marks the first time that McCartney has composed for dance, and Martins' choreography will follow the music's libretto of a romance between lovers from conflicting kingdoms. With costumes designed by another McCartney, renowned fashion designer Stella and projections by S. Katy Tucker with lighting designs by Mark Stanley.

Le Tombeau de Couperin - New York City Ballet
January 27, 2012 -

In this suite of dances in 18th-century courtly style, eight couples are divided into left and right quadrilles. (A quadrille is an 18th-century dance form originating with squadrons at tournaments; it is also referred to as a square dance.) The dancers form geometric patterns — diagonals, diamonds, squares — and dance in unison as well as mimicking the movements of the opposing quadrille. Tombeau means "memorial" or "tomb." In 1919 Ravel composed a commemorative suite for piano in six movements (prelude, fugue, forlane, minuet, rigaudon, and toccato) in memory of six friends who died in World War I. In 1920 the composer orchestrated the piece, eliminating the fugue and the toccato. Ravel honors 18th-century French music in general and the French Baroque composer François Couperin in particular; Couperin was court musician and composer to Louis XIV, the Sun King. Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) was born in the French Basque town of Ciboure. His family moved to Paris and encouraged him to take piano lessons. At fourteen he was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied with Fauré, who became his principal teacher of composition. His ballet scores include Pavane pour une Infante Défunte, Jeux d'Eau, Bolero, Daphnis and Chloé, Ma Mère L'Oye, and L'Enfant et les Sortilèges, a ballet-opera.

DGV: Danse a Grande Vitesse - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

Originally created for The Royal Ballet, DGV propels 26 dancers through space with a supercharged, minimalist score by Michael Nyman.

Firebird - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

Balanchine's Firebird was one of the choreographer's first creations for the young New York City Ballet, using elaborate sets and costumes. The story, the choreography, the sets, and the music all integrated many brilliantly colored elements from Russian folklore. Because Balanchine chose to use the orchestral suite rather than the complete three-act score, he simplified the story and emphasized the mythical elements of the Firebird's character. For revivals in 1970, 1972, and 1980, Balanchine changed his choreography for the Firebird — and sometimes the costume as well — to suit the ballerina cast in the leading role. At Balanchine's invitation, in 1970, the artist Marc Chagall came to New York City to supervise the construction of new sets and costumes based on his designs for a new production. For the 1970 revival, Robbins contributed new choreography for the monsters' dance. The current production was staged in 1985. Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), born in Russia, is acknowledged as one of the great composers of the twentieth century. His work encompassed styles as diverse as Romanticism, Neoclassicism and Serialism. His ballets for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes included The Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Apollo. His music has been used in over thirty ballets originating with New York City Ballet from 1948 through 1987, including Danses Concertantes, Orpheus, The Cage, Agon, Monumentum pro Gesualdo, Rubies, Symphony in Three Movements, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Concerto for Two Solo Pianos, Suite from L'Histoire du Soldat, Concertino, and Jeu de Cartes.

New Wheeldon - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

NYCB's former first-ever Resident Choreographer, Christopher Wheeldon now travels the world as one of the most in-demand dance makers. Wheeldon returns to choreograph a world premiere for the New Combinations Evening, which honors Balanchine's birthday each year with the performance of new work.

Polyphonia - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

"Romantic with comic twists," is how Christopher Wheeldon describes his new work set to ten eclectic piano pieces by Ligeti. Its brief sections run the choreographic spectrum from the bold, neoclassic angularity of Balanchine through playful duets, a dreamy waltz, a gentle, plaintive solo to the intense intertwining of one couple. Anchored by dynamic opening and closing ensembles filled with twisting turns, jabs and quirky hard movements, its eight dances seem to be tearing through the musical fabric. Overhead horizontal lifts, rolls and pushes off the floor contrast with classical ballet steps. The first of two key duets for the leading principal couple evokes sea creatures swimming, while the second looks like a strange plant growing and closing in on itself. The last horizontal lifts and fade out arrest the movement, frame it and let it dissolve like a film. Ligeti's polyphony (many individual voices sounding simultaneously) with fleeting references to Stravinsky, Debussy, Kodály and Prokofiev, among others, finds its match in the choreographer's interweaving of ballet and modem dance movement.

The Steadfast Tin Soldier - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

The Steadfast Tin Soldier, based loosely on a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale, focuses on the wistful courtship and love between a tin soldier and a paper-doll ballerina. The work was commissioned by the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. The present pas de deux stems from a 1955 collaboration in which Balanchine, Francisco Moncion, and Barbara Milberg choreographed all of Bizet's Jeux d'Enfants. Both the context and the woman's variation of The Steadfast Tin Soldier were derived from this earlier work. The soldier's variation was restaged for the new pas de deux. Georges Bizet (1838-1875) is best known for Carmen, one of the most successful operas ever written. However, he had more success in his lifetime with non-operatic works. He was an excellent pianist, and wrote many pieces for that instrument, including Jeux d'Enfants. Many of the operas Bizet wrote, with the exceptions of Carmen and The Pearl Fishers, were destroyed by the composer or never finished.

Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

An eight-minute display of ballet bravura and technique, Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux uses music that the composer belatedly created for Act III of Swan Lake. It was hurriedly composed for Anna Sobeshchanskaya, a Bolshoi prima ballerina who was scheduled to make her debut in the title role at the fourth performance of the 1877 Moscow production, and sought to enrich the part of Odile. Because the music was not in the original score, it was not published with the rest of Swan Lake, and disappeared for more than half a century. When it was discovered in the Bolshoi Theater archives in 1953, Balanchine sought — and was granted — permission to use it for his own choreography.

Who Cares? - New York City Ballet
January 28, 2012 -

In 1937, George Gershwin asked Balanchine to come to Hollywood to work with him on Samuel Goldwyn's "Follies." Tragically, Gershwin was felled by a brain tumor before he completed the ballet music for the film. Thirty-three years later, Balanchine choreographed Who Cares? to 16 songs Gershwin composed between 1924 and 1931, including "I Got Rhythm," "The Man I Love," "Embraceable You," and "My One and Only." Kay's orchestrations draw extensively on Gershwin's own piano arrangements of his songs. Balanchine used the songs not to evoke any particular era but as a way to portray an exuberance that is both broadly American and charged with the distinctive energy of Manhattan.

David Dorfman Dance - Prophets of Funk - Joyce Theater
Through January 29, 2012 -

Heralded by the Boston Globe for its "exuberant, gorgeous and delightfully oddball style," David Dorfman Dance returns to The Joyce with Prophets of Funk, a work that reinvigorates "boomer memories to the sounds of Sly and the Family Stone." (Boston Phoenix). "A celebration of the band's groundbreaking, visceral and political music, a tribute to the 'funk' of everyday people, the piece leaves everyone dancing in their seats, except for those choosing to join the performers on stage," says the choreographer. "Dorfman in league with Sly and the Family Stone? Irresistible." The Village Voice

Camille A. Brown & Dancers - Joyce Theater
Through January 29, 2012 -

A huge hit when she appeared at The Joyce in 2010, Camille A. Brown is noted for mixing modern dance techniques with West African dance elements to produce "focused bursts of energy and frozen positions that explode into motion" (The New York Times). At The Joyce, her company will present three snazzy performances of a program that includes The Groove to Nobody's Business, set to Ray Charles and Brandon McCune, and Been There, Done That, a duet filled with "Brown's considerable and effortless humor." The Boston Globe

SITI Company - Bob - New York Live Arts
Through January 29, 2012 -

Returning for its third New York City Season, SITI Company is proud to begin its presenting partnership with the newly formed New York Live Arts with its Obie Award-winning Bob. Bob is a solo show that revolves around the life and times of an internationally known avant-garde theater director. Acclaimed as a genius, he rides the fast track of the ever-shrinking global art scene. He uses his own history and everyone around him as fodder for his grandiose staged spectacles. Through Bob, you'll experience a creative crisis in the making and see where American pop culture and high culture collide. Bob is not meant to be a realistic portrait of Robert Wilson the man, rather a dip into an engaging perspective about family, art, and American Culture.

CSI: The Experience - Discovery Times Square
Through March 04, 2012 - New York

Play the role of a crime scene investigator at CSI: The Experience! As the latest recruit in the world of forensic science, guests are guided by videos featuring CSI: cast members and real-life forensic scientists. Throughout the exhibition you must examine blood types, while matching DNA to potential suspects in order to complete the investigation process and solve the crime. Complete with 3 Crime Scenes, 15 Forensic Lab Stations, and dazzling special effects, this hands-on experience is sure to plunge exhibit goers deep into the science of solving crimes.

Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times - Discovery Times Square
Through April 15, 2012 - New York

Take a fascinating archaeological journey through the Holy Land. This rare exhibit features the famed Dead Sea Scrolls, a stone from the Western Wall from the Second Temple in Jerusalem and more than 500 never-before-seen artifacts from biblical times. Experience firsthand the traditions, beliefs and iconic objects of ancient Israel that impact world religions today.


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