Follow Us  
Things to do this week in NYC Jan 28-Feb 4: Museums
Post Feedback | Printer-Friendly | Send Article to a Friend
January 28, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

Featured Listings
American Museum of Natural History Photos American Museum of Natural History· A museum for the 21st century, with a rich and storied past ...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum· Frank Lloyd Wright's masterpiece of modern architecture is h...

Hasted Kraeutler· International contemporary art from emerging and established...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)· One of the world's finest collections of modern and contempo...

American Museum of Natural History Photos Museum of Sex· This museum presents the history, evolution, and the cultura...

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Family Program: Living & Working in the Sky - The Skyscraper Museum
January 28, 2012 - New York

Families will learn about the world's tallest building, Burj Khalifa in Dubai, and the Shanghai Tower, now under construction, to see how vertical metropolises are combining a range of activities in clusters of high-rise buildings. Kids will create model mixed-use buildings using different materials.

Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties - Brooklyn Museum
Through January 29, 2012 - Prospect Heights

The exhibition Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties brings together for the first time the work of sixty-eight painters, sculptors, and photographers who explored a new mode of modern realism in the years bounded by the aftermath of the Great War and the onset of the Great Depression. Throughout the 1920s, artists created images of liberated modern bodies and the changing urban-industrial environment with an eye toward ideal form and ordered clarity -- qualities seemingly at odds with a riotous decade best remembered for its flappers and Fords.

Treasures of Islamic Manuscript Painting from the Morgan - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 29, 2012 -

This exhibition presents important Islamic manuscripts, including an illustrated translation of the life of celebrated Persian poet, and beautifully written Qur'ans.

An Artist Remembers: Hanukkah Lamps Selected by Maurice Sendak - The Jewish Museum
Through January 29, 2012 -

For this exhibition, the museum invited renowned artist and illustrator Maurice Sendak to choose a group of Hanukkah lamps from the collection. Sendak's work is characterized by a push and pull between beauty and sorrow, light and darkness. His art is triggered by memories and is also their repository. The world he creates is both dangerous and healing, as he tries to deal with the trauma of the Holocaust, in which many members of his family perished.

When going through the museum's collection, the sheer number and variety of lamps struck a nerve, underscoring Sendak's deep, lifelong sense of loss at the destruction of the prewar world of his Eastern European Jewish parents. Having movingly evoked that world in his drawings for Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories (1966) and In Grandpa's House (1985), he surprised himself by mostly avoiding its rich visual language when choosing lamps for this presentation. "I stayed away from everything elaborate. I kept looking for very plain, square ones, very severe looking," he explained. "Their very simplicity reminded me of the Holocaust. And I thought it was inappropriate for me to be thinking of elaboration."

The lamps Sendak finds most compelling and poignant are those that "go right to the heart," whose "beauty is contained." Yet his sense of humor is never far from the surface: as he made his choices he often free-associated, whimsically recalling old movies and Catskills family vacations. Above all, he is guided by his sensibility as an artist and author. He is drawn to simplicity of line, to a design "subservient to the basic idea of the piece," and responds to the depth of emotion that emanates from a work itself or from the stories behind it. Concerned lest the past be forgotten, he hopes that young visitors to this exhibition will keep alive the memory of a vanished world.

MoMA PS1 Winter Open House - MoMA PS1
January 29, 2012 - Long Island City

Please join us for an afternoon of art, lectures, and food to celebrate the opening of Henry Taylor and Darren Bader: Images.

M. Wells will be cooking up their delicious culinary creations all afternoon.

At 4 PM, the e-flux journal lecture series at MoMA PS1 presents a lecture by Bilal Khbeiz on exile, memory and mythology with an introduction by Walid Raad.

Clifford Owens: Anthology, Rania Stephan, Frances Stark: My Best Thing, Surasi Kusolwong, and Chim?Pom will also be on view.

The Making of a Collection - Islamic Art at the Metropolitan - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through February 05, 2012 -

The Metropolitan Museum of Art houses one of the largest, most comprehensive collections of Islamic art in the world. This could not have been achieved without the generosity of dedicated individuals who supported the Museum with gifts and bequests. This exhibition will be a chronological study of some of the Museum's major donor-collectors, whose gifts form the core of the collection of the Department of Islamic Art, illuminating the factors and motivations that inspired their collecting habits.

Particular attention will be paid to the early collectors during the first decades of Islamic art collecting in America, a period when as much as fifty percent of the Department's collection was established. From the last quarter of the nineteenth century to the early 1930s, objects from the Islamic world were introduced to the American market as exotic treasures and gradually gained public recognition. The interest in travel to the Middle East that had earlier spawned a vast travel literature in Europe caught on in America as well. It was the time of the Orientalist movement. At international expositions, governments of the Near East erected pavilions in which imported objects and parts of buildings where shown and, afterward, sold to Americans. Oriental art dealers played a critical role: as tastemakers for Islamic art, they acted as intermediaries between governments, American collectors, and museums.

Since then, the Metropolitan's collection has continued to grow and, as in the past, generous donors continue to support its acquisitions. Today, the collection comprises approximately twelve thousand objects, of which -- in conjunction with the reopening of the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia on November 1 -- twelve hundred will be on view.

Robert Burns and 'Auld Lang Syne' - Morgan Library & Museum
Through February 05, 2012 -

This highly focused exhibition explores the origins of a song that began as an old Scots poem and air and evolved into a globally shared expression of friendship and longing.

Museum as Hub: Due to Unforeseen Events... - New Museum of Contemporary Art
Through February 05, 2012 - New York

"Museum as Hub: Beirut Art Center: Due to unforeseen events…" is an exhibition by the Beirut Art Center that sets out to explore five incidents in which artworks produced in Beirut over the last thirty years were fundamentally altered in the process—and by the process—of being presented to the public. The cases under consideration here concern films, performances, sculptures, and installations by Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, Rabih Mroué, Tony Chakar, Saloua Raouda Choucair, and Ziad Abillama. For the Beirut Art Center's participation in the New Museum's Museum as Hub, five artists and one scholar have gathered clues, notes, documents, and descriptions to explain what happened to these works as they crossed a threshold from an artist's intentions to an audience's reception. In each case, something dramatic occurred, which unfixed the meaning of the piece, threatened its material integrity, and called into question the process by which a society and a state accords objects, actions, and interventions with the status of art. By revisiting these events, the exhibition not only reveals the complicated conditions under which art is made and shown in a place like Beirut, it also illustrates how even the most vexing moments of transformation—whether an artwork is altered by censorship, litigation, destruction, theft, or total social rejection—have the potential to open up new fields of inquiry and generate new work. To that end, "Due to unforeseen events…" includes photographs, videos, texts, a slideshow, and a mixed-media installation that were created specially for the exhibition to reflect on the curious afterlife of the original artworks. They consider what their subsequent alterations have to say about the semblance and substance of trust that exists between artists and the public, as well as between institutions and the communities they serve.

In the Resource Center, Beirut Art Center will also present their Mediatheque, a digital archive that offers public access to works—including video, image, sound, and text—by a growing number of artists from Arab countries; Iran; Turkey; and Armenia. Over sixty artists are featured in the Mediatheque including Mounira Al Solh, Ayreen Anastas, Tarek Atoui, Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige, Mona Hatoum, Emily Jacir, Hassan Khan, Rabih Mroue, Walid Raad, Wael Shawky, Rania Stephan, Rayyane Tabet, Jalal Toufic, Ala Younis, and Akram Zaatari, among others. The Mediatheque also includes select documentation of events that have taken place at Beirut Art Center since its opening.

"Museum as Hub: Due to unforeseen events…" is organized by guest curators Sandra Dagher and Lamia Joreige for Beirut Art Center.

Work of Art - The Next Great Artist - Brooklyn Museum
Through February 05, 2012 -

This exhibition will spotlight the season two winner of Work of Art, Bravo's hour-long creative competition series among contemporary artists. The series, airing weekly beginning October 12, 2011, brings together fourteen aspiring artists competing for the final prize of a solo show at the Brooklyn Museum. In each episode, the contestants are faced with the challenge of creating unique pieces in a variety of mediums, including painting, sculpture, photography, collage, and industrial design.

The panel judging their work includes series host China Chow; Bill Powers, a New York gallery owner and arts writer; and Jerry Saltz, art critic for New York magazine. Art auctioneer Simon de Pury serves as a mentor to the contestants, and a new guest judge joins the panel each week.

Pop Objects and Icons from the Guggenheim Collection - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through February 12, 2012 - New York

This focused exhibition demonstrates various artists' engagement with Pop art and the Guggenheim's ongoing interest in the legacy of the style.

Charles Dickens at 200 - Morgan Library & Museum
Through February 12, 2012 -

This exhibition explores the inspiration and creative energies of Charles Dickens, Britain's first literary superstar.

HIDE/SEEK: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture - Brooklyn Museum
Through February 12, 2012 -

The first major museum exhibition to focus on themes of gender and sexuality in modern American portraiture, HIDE/SEEK: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture brings together more than one hundred works in a wide range of media, including paintings, photographs, works on paper, film, and installation art. The exhibition charts the underdocumented role that sexual identity has played in the making of modern art, and highlights the contributions of gay and lesbian artists to American art. Beginning in the late nineteenth century with Thomas Eakins' Realist paintings, HIDE/SEEK traces the often coded narrative of sexual desire in art produced throughout the early modern period and up to the present. The exhibition features pieces by canonical figures in American art—including George Bellows, Marsden Hartley, Alice Neel, and Berenice Abbott—along with works that openly assert gay and lesbian subjects in modern and contemporary art, by artists such as Jess Collins and Tee Corinne.

Gifted: Collectors and Drawings at MoMA, 1929-1983 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 13, 2012 - New York

This exhibition examines the history of MoMA's drawings collection through key gifts from donors whose connections with the Museum helped shape the institution from its earliest days. Lillie P. Bliss and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, founders of MoMA, gave numerous masterworks to the new museum, including some of its most prized drawings. In later decades bequests by influential collectors such as James Thrall Soby continued to augment the holdings of works by artists the Museum had already shown a commitment to, while other collections, like that of Joan and Lester Avnet, were formed with MoMA's needs specifically in mind. More idiosyncratic collections, such as Ruth Vollmer's bequest to the Museum, accepted in 1983, reflect the life and activities of individual art enthusiasts during key moments in art history. Gifted is a reevaluation of the drawings collection, reflecting not only the richness of MoMA's holdings, but also the diverse forces that have shaped it and the corresponding history it represents.

Scenes from Zagreb: Artists' Publications of the New Art Practice - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 17, 2012 - New York

The New Art Practice was a term created for a generation of artists in the former Yugoslavia active in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. These artists shifted their practice to spaces outside the traditional studio, onto city streets, into artist-run spaces, and in multimedia performances and experimental publications. Focusing on artists working in the city of Zagreb, this exhibition documents aspects of this shift and highlights the ability of artists' publications to record these often ephemeral gestures and ideas. While artists such as Goran Trbuljak, Braco Dimitrijevic, Sanja Ivekovic, Mladen Stilinovic, and Vlado Martek, among others, worked in a variety of mediums, they shared a common impulse to produce publications. These artists questioned and played with ideas about the place of an artist within this particular political and socioeconomic context. Their work often involved public participation and blurred traditional notions of authorship through collective activities, chance operations, and the appropriation of language and imagery from the state and commercial media. The materials in this installation resonate with other contemporaneous scenes in Eastern and Central Europe and with broader international trends, while also providing an insight into very local networks of experimental artists and writers in Zagreb.

Korean Eye: Energy and Matter - Museum of Arts & Design
Through February 19, 2012 -

Internationally-acclaimed exhibition Korean Eye: Energy and Matter, sponsored by Standard Chartered, shines a spotlight on new work by contemporary Korean artists. Korean Eye: Energy and Matter reflects a new era of diversity in Korean life, politics, and culture, and offers a unique opportunity for education and appreciation of Korea's rapidly developing art scene, which until recently has seen little global exposure. Korean Eye: Energy and Matter extends MAD's focus on materials and process in contemporary art and design by showcasing works of art in an astonishing range of materials, reflecting the ways in which Korean artists today are exploring techniques both traditional and innovative. Korean Eye: Energy and Matter offers an illuminating commentary on the philosophical and aesthetic conditions of modern Korean culture, from virtual reality and the pervasive influence of fantasy and pop culture to the dehumanization inherent in a post-industrial society. By turns ironic, satirical, and metaphorical, the exhibition includes photo-sculptures by Seung Hyo Jang; embroidery and acrylic paintings by Young In Hong; a large, imposing shark fabricated from reclaimed and repurposed automobile tires by Yong Ho Ji; and Meekyoung Shin's astonishing "antique" porcelain vases, rendered in soap.

Projects 96: Haris Epaminonda - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 20, 2012 - New York

Berlin-based artist Haris Epaminonda (b. 1980, Nicosia, Cyprus) is internationally known for her photographic assemblages constructed from books and magazines of the 1950s and 1960s, and for her video installations, in which film and television footage culled from Greek soap operas, are reshot or re-edited in new sequences with a single soundtrack that provides an acoustic link. This exhibition presents Epaminonda's three-channel video installation Tarahi IIII, V, VI (2007), part of an ongoing series that enlists the use of reverse shooting, montage, cuts, superimposition, and repetition of motifs to address the permeability of memory. Favoring a slowed-down, filmic flow and the lush colors one associates with the saturated hues of Douglas Sirk's melodramas, these enigmatic videos are presented in a new installation involving sculptural and architectural structures—columns, pedestals, drapery, and niches—specifically conceived for the space at MoMA. The exhibition marks the 40th anniversary of the Projects series, which has played a critical part in the Museum's contemporary art programs.

Jim Henson's Fantastic World - Museum of the Moving Image
Through March 04, 2012 -

The exhibition features more than 120 artifacts, including drawings, storyboards, and props, and video material that illustrate Henson's boundless creativity and innumerable accomplishments. A special addition to the exhibition at Museum of the Moving Image is a puppet of Miss Piggy from The Muppets Take Manhattan. Among other highlights are fourteen additional iconic original puppets of such characters as Kermit the Frog, Rowlf, Bert, and Ernie; photographs of Henson and his collaborators at work; and excerpts from Henson's early projects and experimental films. The exhibition spans Henson's entire career, beginning with drawings, cartoons, and posters produced during his college years in the late 1950s and concluding with objects related to the inspired imaginary worlds of his popular fantasy film The Dark Crystal (1982). Visitors will encounter materials from Henson's best-known projects, The Muppet Show, The Muppet Movie and its sequels, and Fraggle Rock, as well as objects related to his Sesame Street characters. Visitors will also learn about Sam and Friends, an early show Henson created in the 1950s, Henson's television commercial work in the 1960s, and the segments Henson made for The Ed Sullivan Show.

Infinite Jest: Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to Levine - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through March 04, 2012 -

The exhibition explores caricature and satire in its many forms from the Italian Renaissance to the present, drawn primarily from the rich collection of this material in the Museum's Department of Drawings and Prints. The show includes drawings and prints by Leonardo da Vinci, Eugene Delacroix, Francisco de Goya, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Enrique Chagoya alongside works by artists more often associated with humor, such as James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, Honore Daumier, Al Hirschfeld, and David Levine. Many of these engaging caricatures and satires have never been exhibited and are little known except to specialists.

Print Studio - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through March 09, 2012 - New York

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Print/Out, Print Studio is an interactive space that explores the evolution of artistic practices relating to the medium of print. The studio offers a series of drop-in workshops, lectures, and events that emphasize accessible and sustainable models for the production and dissemination of ideas. Drawing from resources such as the Reanimation Library (based in the Gowanus area of Brooklyn) -- a collection of discarded books acquired for their visual content -- and a variety of print techniques, participants are invited to experiment with and manipulate images and text. Artist- and educator-led activities highlight the ways in which new digital technologies incorporate traditional printing practices, reimagining the role of print in contemporary visual culture.

The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through March 18, 2012 -

It has been said that the Renaissance witnessed the rediscovery of the individual. In keeping with this notion, early Renaissance Italy also hosted the first great age of portraiture in Europe. Portraiture assumed a new importance, whether it was to record the features of a family member for future generations, celebrate a prince or warrior, extol the beauty of a woman, or make possible the exchange of a likeness among friends. This exhibition will bring together approximately 160 works—by artists including Donatello, Filippo Lippi, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Ghirlandaio, Pisanello, Mantegna, Giovanni Bellini, and Antonello da Messina, and in media ranging from painting and manuscript illumination to marble sculpture and bronze medals, testifying to the new vogue for and uses of portraiture in fifteenth-century Italy.

During the early Renaissance, artists working in Florence, Venice, and the courts of Italy created magnificent portrayals of the people around them—from heads of state and church to patrons, scholars, poets, and artists—concentrating for the first time on producing recognizable likenesses and expressions of personality. The rapid development of portraiture was linked closely to Renaissance society and politics, ideals of the individual, and concepts of beauty. The object may have been to commemorate a significant event—a marriage, death, the accession to a position of power—or it may have been to record the features of an esteemed member of the family for future generations.

Featuring many rare international loans, this exhibition will present an unprecedented survey of the period and provide new research and insight into the early history of portraiture. It will be divided into three sections and will span a period of eight decades. Beginning in Florence, where independent portraits first appeared in abundance, it moves to the courts of Ferrara, Mantua, Bologna, Milan, Urbino, Naples and papal Rome, and ends in Venice, where a tradition of portraiture asserted itself surprisingly late in the century.

Police Work: Photographs by Leonard Freed, 1972-1979 - Museum of the City of New York
Through March 18, 2012 -

Police Work: Photographs by Leonard Freed, 1972-1979 features a selection of vintage prints by the Brooklyn-born photographer who documented "life on the beat" with NYPD officers during the tumultuous 1970s. During a time when New York City faced near bankruptcy and was internationally notorious for its high crime rates and social disorder, Freed's photographs reveal the complexity, the harshness, and the camaraderie of the city's public safety servants and the people they protected. Highlighting a recent gift to the Museum of the City of New York by his widow Bridgette Freed, the exhibition is a gritty, realistic portrait of ordinary people doing a "sometimes boring, sometimes corrupting, sometimes dangerous and ugly and unhealthy job."

Brian Bress: Status Report - New Museum of Contemporary Art
Through March 25, 2012 - New York

This exhibition, the latest presentation in the New Museum's 'Stowaways' series, will be the New York premier of Brian Bress's Status Report (2009). In Bress's low-tech video, humorous characters, all played by the artist, struggle with interpersonal relationships, the pursuit of intended goals, and the desire to communicate. Manipulating pictorial and sculptural conventions through fantastically hand-crafted sets and costumes that combine drawing, painting, and collage, Bress creates a disjunctive world where spaces of imagination and representation compete for equal footing. Brian Bress (b. 1975) lives and works in Los Angeles. His videos have been shown at ICA, Philadelphia; LAX Art, Los Angeles; Diverse Works, Houston; University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa; and Parrish Art Museum, South Hampton. His work was included in the comprehensive survey exhibition "California Video: Artists and Histories" presented at the Getty Museum in 2008. This is Bress's first New York museum presentation.

Sanja Ivekovic: Sweet Violence - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through March 26, 2012 - New York

The first museum exhibition in the United States of the work of Sanja Ivekovic (b. 1949, Zagreb) covers four decades of the artist's remarkable career. A feminist, activist, and video pioneer, Ivekovic came of age in the post-1968 period, when artists broke free from mainstream institutional settings, laying the ground for a form of praxis antipodal to official art. Part of the generation known as the Nova Umjetnicka Praksa (New Art Practice), Ivekovic produced works of cross-cultural resonance that range from conceptual photomontages to video and performance. This exhibition brings together a historic group of single-channel videos and media installations, including Sweet Violence (1974), Personal Cuts (1982), Practice Makes a Master (1982/2009), General Alert (Soap Opera) (1995), and Rohrbach Living Memorial (2005). Among the 100 photomontages featured in the exhibition is Ivekovic's celebrated series Double Life (1975-76), for which the artist juxtaposed pictures of herself culled from her private albums with commercial ads clipped from the pages of women's magazines. While in the 1970s Ivekovic probed the persuasive qualities of mass media and its identity-forging potential, after 1990--following the fall of the Berlin Wall, the disintegration of Yugoslavia, and the birth of a new nation--she focused on the transformation of reality from socialist to post-socialist political systems. Ivekovic offers a fascinating view into the official politics of power, gender roles, and the paradoxes inherent in society's collective memory. The exhibition will be accompanied by a major publication.

Remembering 9/11 - New-York Historical Society
Through April 01, 2012 - Upper West Side

To commemorate the tenth anniversary of September 11, the New-York Historical Society will present a special exhibition, Remembering 9/11, which will be free to the public. The exhibition opens on September 8, 2011 and will remain on view through April 1, 2012. The exhibition presents a selection of several hundred photographs taken by professional and amateur photographers in the immediate aftermath of the attack on the World Trade Center (originally collected in the independent exhibition "here is new york: a democracy of photographs"), as well as letters written to policemen and firemen; objects that were placed in makeshift shrines around New York; images and texts from the New York Times "Portraits of Grief" series; photographs of the Tribute in Light; and drawings of the National September 11 Memorial, designed by architect Michael Arad with the assistance of landscape architect Peter Walker.

The Ronald S. Lauder Collection: Selections from the 3rd Century BC to the 20th Century/Germany, Austria, and France - Neue Galerie
Through April 02, 2012 - New York

Devoted to the extraordinary collection of Neue Galerie co-founder Ronald Lauder, the show will provide a rare glimpse into one of the finest private art collections in the world.

The Ronald S. Lauder collection encompasses a broad range of masterworks. The exhibition will focus on six areas: medieval art, arms and armor, Old Master paintings, 19th- and 20th-century drawings, fine and decorative art of Vienna 1900, and modern and contemporary art. Among the artists represented are Joseph Beuys, Constantin Brancusi, Paul Cézanne, Vasily Kandinsky, Anselm Kiefer, Gustav Klimt, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Gerhard Richter.

Audubon: National Treasures - The Five Watercolors for the Second Fascicle of 'The Birds of America' - New-York Historical Society
Through April 08, 2012 - New York

Looking at these five watercolors you are enjoying an experience similar to that of John James Audubon's (1785–1851) original subscribers to The Birds of America (1827-1838). In distributing its 435 plates, he followed a nineteenth-century practice of issuing them serially by subscription in 87 fascicles (groups) of five prints. In a brilliant marketing ploy, John James Audubon packaged each group of engravings to consist of three small, one medium, and one large, spectacular species. The latter fully exploited the double-elephant-size paper, the largest then available, used for the prints and the watercolors of the biggest birds. In the second grouping, the pièce de résistance was the Wild Turkey (hen and chicks). Two of the other four preparatory watercolors date from an intense early period of studying birds in the company of his best pupil from Cincinnati, Joseph Mason (1808–1842), who painted many of the botanical specimens during 1821-22. All five prints after these watercolor models were initially engraved by William Home Lizars (1788–1859) in Edinburgh and retouched later by Robert Havell Jr. (1793–1878) in London. The 435 hand-colored aquatints and etchings of The Birds of America contain at least 1,026 life-size birds representing around 500 species (a number that changes as DNA evidence alters modern taxonomy). This deluxe edition, considered the most spectacular color folio print series ever produced, remains one of the world's preeminent natural history documents.

Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904-1965) - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through April 15, 2012 -

Perhaps the greatest figure painter and landscapist of China's modern period, Fu Baoshi successfully integrated Western and traditional artistic influences to create haunting images that evoke a mood as much as a place or person. This exhibition will treat Fu's forty-year career with some seventy paintings, including many of the artist's recognized masterpieces, drawn from the preeminent holdings of China's Nanjing Museum. The exhibition, augmented by superb works from a New York private collection, will be the most comprehensive treatment of the artist's oeuvre ever presented outside of Asia. Co-organized with the Cleveland Museum of Art, the exhibition will feature a richly illustrated catalogue.

Enrico David: Head Gas - New Museum of Contemporary Art
Through April 22, 2012 - New York

"Head Gas" is the first New York exhibition by Italian-born, Berlin-based artist Enrico David. Over the past twenty years, David has produced a body of work encompassing painting, drawing, sculpture, and collage that draws upon a rich variety of sources and expresses a range of complex emotional states. Although his work is highly celebrated throughout Europe--the artist was among the nominees for the 2009 Turner Prize, for example--David's work has rarely been exhibited in the United States. The figures populating David's work convey the struggle of adaptation, both physical and psychological, of the self and of the image. In his art, we see haunting, incomplete, and sometimes grotesque characters fighting against and merging into backgrounds comprising a personal lexicon of forms. These patterns are derived from craft, folk art, and twentieth-century design, as well as advertising, techniques of display, fashion, and art historical moments. Previously, David choreographed his figurative works to imply dramatic narratives, at times using the exhibition space as a stage. His exhibitions function as performances of self-analysis constructed and theatricalized specifically for public display. Through David's highly personalized iconography, the works act as mirrors, reflecting viewers' desires, fears, and vulnerabilities. In David's more recent work, the implications and strands of psychological tension are enacted within a more formalized, image-based corporeality. For his 'Studio 231' exhibition, David has created an entirely new body of work. The paintings and works on paper are part of a series of portraits rendered delicately in pencil and luminescent fields of acrylic paint applied with a sponge or caressing brush. David's imagery suggests bodies at the point of apparition or dissolution-beings that cannot be contained or consumed, perhaps only passed through, and reluctantly present. 'I imagine these images as the product of a conscious, physiological act of will. To exist despite the alienating and antagonizing nature of their surrounding environment-as if a precarious and utterly temporary agreement was struck between them and the molecular components of paint and canvas, lines and colors, even the space itself, threaten to engulf them,' says David. 'These conditions, as ridiculous and unlikely as they may sound, represent for me an experience that feels real, necessary to embrace, even optimistic.' 'Head Gas' also features a new series of hand-painted paravents. These folding screens, originally conceived by the artist for his own apartment, create an architectural intervention within the exhibition space, simultaneously connecting to the images occupying the gallery. Enrico David is the second artist featured in the New Museum's new 'Studio 231' series. The Museum inaugurated the series in October 2011, with a new installation and performances by London-based artist Spartacus Chetwynd. 'Studio 231' is a series of commissioned projects in the museum's adjacent, ground-floor space at 231 Bowery. This new initiative will give international, emerging artists the opportunity to realize ambitious new works conceived especially for the space. These projects at 231 Bowery also seek to foster a new relationship between the artists and the public by allowing artists to create work outside the confines of the main museum building and in closer proximity to the energy of the street and to the creative space of the artist's studio.

Rembrandt's World: Dutch Drawings from the Clement C. Moore Collection - Morgan Library & Museum
Through April 29, 2012 -

This exhibition focuses on artists who worked in their native Holland during the fertile period of the seventeenth century known as the Dutch Golden Age.

White Gold: Highlights from the Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain - Frick Collection
Through April 29, 2012 - New York

The Portico Gallery for Decorative Arts and Sculpture opens in late December with an inaugural exhibition of works drawn from Henry Arnhold's promised gift of 131 examples of Meissen porcelain from the early years of this Royal Manufactory's production. On view through April 29, 2012, White Gold: Highlights from the Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain will feature approximately seventy of these objects, presented along with a group of eighteenth-century sculptures by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1740–1828). Among the latter works is the full-length terracotta Diana the Huntress, a signature work at the Frick that returns to view having been recently cleaned and treated. It finds a permanent home in the new portico gallery, while the ongoing display of other sculptures and ceramics will rotate periodically.

Storytelling in Japanese Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 06, 2012 -

Japan has enjoyed a long tradition of narrative painting, one that continues even today with the popular contemporary Japanese cartoon (manga) and animation. This exhibition will offer particularly stellar examples of illustrated Japanese narrative works from the thirteenth to the nineteenth century. Drawn from some of the foremost American collections as well as the Museum's own holdings, it will be the first exhibition devoted to this subject in the United States in more than twenty-five years. It will feature more than sixty-five exquisitely executed paintings in various formats: handscroll (emaki), album, book, hanging scroll, screen, and playing cards.

Duncan Phyfe - Master Cabinetmaker in New York - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 06, 2012 -

n the early 1800s, furniture from the workshop of New York City cabinetmaker Duncan Phyfe (1770–1854) was in such demand that he was referred to as the "United States Rage." This exhibition—the first retrospective on Phyfe in ninety years—will serve to re-introduce this artistic and influential master cabinetmaker to a contemporary audience. The full chronological sweep of Phyfe's distinguished career will be featured, including examples of his best-known furniture based on the English Regency designs of Thomas Sheraton, work from the middle and later stages of his career when he adopted the richer "archaeological" antique style of the 1820s, and a highly refined, plain Grecian style based on French Restauration prototypes. The exhibition brings together nearly one hundred works from private and public collections throughout the United States. Highlights of the exhibition include some never-before-seen documented masterpieces and furniture descended directly in the Phyfe family, as well as the cabinetmaker's own tool chest. Organized chronologically, the exhibition will present the cabinetmaker's life and work through drawings, documents, personal possession, and furniture. Portraits of his clients and contemporary depictions of New York City street scenes and domestic interiors will provide a glimpse into Phyfe's milieu.

The Loving Story: Photographs by Grey Villet - International Center of Photography
Through May 06, 2012 - New York

Forty-five years ago, sixteen states still prohibited interracial marriage. Then, in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court considered the case of Richard Perry Loving, a white man, and his wife, Mildred Loving, a woman of African American and Native American descent, who had been arrested for miscegenation nine years earlier in Virginia. The Lovings were not active in the Civil Rights movement but their tenacious legal battle to justify their marriage changed history when the Supreme Court unanimously declared Virginia's anti-miscegenation law -- and all race-based marriage bans -- unconstitutional. LIFE magazine photographer Grey Villet's intimate images were uncovered by director Nancy Buirski during the making of The Loving Story, a documentary debuting on February 14, 2012 on HBO. The exhibition, organized by Assistant Curator of Collections Erin Barnett, includes some 20 vintage prints loaned by the estate of Grey Villet and by the Loving family.

Perspectives 2012 - International Center of Photography
Through May 06, 2012 - New York

Perspectives is an exhibition series that focuses on emerging young artists working in photography and video. The small group exhibitions in the series are nonthematic, highlighting the individual ideas and achievements of an engaging and eclectic group of new faces. Those presented within Perspectives have not been widely exhibited, inspiring conversations on contemporary art, broadening ICP's audience, and revealing work that may otherwise not be seen outside of a small gallery setting. Above all, Perspectives will highlight global contemporary artists who have not yet been shown in New York, and who may not conventionally be considered photographers. ICP Curator Christopher Phillips organized this second exhibition in the series, which includes work by Chien-Chi Chang, Greg Girard, and Anna Shteynshleyger.

Magnum Contact Sheets - International Center of Photography
Through May 06, 2012 - New York

Magnum Contact Sheets reveals how Magnum photographers have captured and edited their best shots from the 1930s to the present. The contact sheet, a direct print of a roll or sequence of negatives, is the photographer's first look at what he or she has captured on film, and provides a uniquely intimate glimpse into their working process. It records each step on the route to arriving at an image -- providing a rare behind-the-scenes sense of walking alongside the photographer and seeing through their eyes. Including both celebrated icons of photography and lesser-known surprises, the exhibition functions as an "epitaph" to the contact sheet, now rendered obsolete by digital photography. Through these fascinating and usually private images, the exhibition celebrates what and how photographers saw for nearly a century. Coinciding with the publication of Magnum Contact Sheets (Thames & Hudson), edited by ICP Curator Kristen Lubben, the exhibition includes a selection of some of the 139 contact sheets in the book.

Diego Rivera: Murals for The Museum of Modern Art - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through May 14, 2012 - New York

Diego Rivera was the subject of MoMA's second monographic exhibition (the first was Henri Matisse), which set new attendance records in its five-week run from December 22, 1931, to January 27, 1932. MoMA brought Rivera to New York six weeks before the exhibition's opening and gave him studio space within the Museum, a strategy intended to solve the problem of how to present the work of this famous muralist when murals were by definition made and fixed on site. Working around the clock with two assistants, Rivera produced five "portable murals"—large blocks of frescoed plaster, slaked lime, and wood that feature bold images drawn from Mexican subject matter and address themes of revolution and class inequity. After the opening, to great publicity, Rivera added three more murals, now taking on New York subjects through monumental images of the urban working class and the social stratification of the city during the Great Depression. All eight were on display for the rest of the show's run. The first of these panels, Agrarian Leader Zapata, is an icon in the Museum's collection.

This exhibition will bring together key works made for Rivera's 1931 exhibition, presenting them at MoMA for the first time in nearly 80 years. Along with mural panels, the show will include full-scale drawings, smaller working drawings, archival materials related to the commission and production of these works, and designs for Rivera's famous Rockefeller Center mural, which he also produced while he was working at the Museum. Focused specifically on works created during the artist's stay in New York, this exhibition will draw a succinct portrait of Rivera as a highly cosmopolitan figure who moved between Russia, Mexico, and the United States, and will offer a fresh look at the intersection of art making and radical politics in the 1930s. MoMA will be the exhibition's sole venue.

Hanging Around: Necklaces from MAD's Collection - Museum of Arts & Design
Through May 21, 2012 -

For at least forty thousand years, in virtually all cultures, humans have worn objects of symbolic, decorative, and amuletic value around their necks. Ranging in length from chokers to rope necklaces that hang below the waist, and in form from simple pendants to elaborate sculptural collars and breastplates, necklaces are strategically positioned beneath the face to draw attention to themselves, enhancing the wearer's allure, power, or status and showcasing the maker's artistic skills. The unique works on display in Hanging Around are from the Museum of Arts and Design's jewelry collection. Dating from the 1960s to the present, these artistic creations encompass conceptual approaches ranging from the decorative to the provocatively political. Some of the necklaces on view feature precious metals and rare gemstones, but others derive their impact from materials as unconventional as pig intestines, gun triggers, mustard seeds, LED lighting, black coral, butterfly wings, phone directories, mirrors and lenses. The fabrication techniques employed by the artists are as different as traditional goldsmithing and cutting-edge digital prototyping.

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter! - American Museum of Natural History
Through May 28, 2012 - Upper West Side

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter!, a perennial favorite visited by millions of children and adults, returns to the American Museum of Natural History. This popular winter attraction invites visitors to mingle with up to 500 iridescent butterflies fluttering among blooming tropical flowers and lush green vegetation inside a free-standing, balmy, 1,200-square-foot enclosure.

The Coe Collection of American Indian Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through May 28, 2012 -

Drawn from works given and bequeathed to the Metropolitan during the past decade by Ralph T. Coe of Santa Fe, New Mexico, the exhibition will be comprised of some thirty objects made in natural materials from stone to animal hide. It will feature a wide range of Native American works that come from different times, different places, and numerous distinct peoples.

The oldest pieces in the Coe Collection date to some thousands of years B.C.E. The major part of the collection dates from the nineteenth to early twentieth century, a period of great contact between Native Americans and outsiders of all sorts, from traders to missionaries to the U.S. army. The peoples of the Great Plains are prominent during this time, and objects such as the impressive, personalized hide shirts of important Indian men have come to identify American Indians in the public mind. Representing contemporary work, an imposing sculpture of a Noble Woman by the Northwest Coast Haida artist Robert Davidson, dated to 2001, will be on view—the product of a long, deeply felt tradition for the carving of wood.

Question Bridge: Black Males - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 03, 2012 -

Question Bridge: Black Males is an innovative video installation created by artists Hank Willis Thomas and Chris Johnson in collaboration with Bayeté Ross Smith and Kamal Sinclair. The four collaborators spent several years traveling throughout the United States, speaking with 150 Black men living in 12 American cities and towns, including New York, Chicago, Oakland, Birmingham, and New Orleans. From these interviews they created 1,500 video exchanges in which the subjects, representing a range of geographic, generational, economic, and educational strata, serve as both interviewers and interviewees. Their words were woven together to simulate a stream-of-consciousness dialogue, through which important themes and issues emerge, including family, love, interracial relationships, community, education, violence, and the past, present, and future of Black men in American society. The exhibition includes multiple screens playing videos of the interviews, edited so that it appears as if the men are having a conversation. The artists hope that the Question Bridge project will be a catalyst for constructive dialogue that will help deconstruct stereotypes about Black male identity in our collective consciousness. Museum visitors are also invited to visit the user-generated Question Bridge website, accessible on iPads throughout the gallery, which offers a platform to represent and redefine Black male identity in America.

Hero, Villian, Yeti - The Rubin Museum
Through June 11, 2012 - New York

Comic book storylines have drawn on Tibet's cultural and religious traditions for more than sixty years, mixing reality with myths and long-held stereotypes. Featuring more than fifty comic books from around the world, Hero, Villain, Yeti sheds light on global perceptions of Tibet as reflected in and informed by these diverse narratives.

“Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models” Exhibition - Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
Through July 08, 2012 - New York

“Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models,” a new exhibition that examines the detailed process of building model ships at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and will be on display through Sunday, July 8, 2012. The exhibition consists of dozens of artifacts including model ships, vintage toy ships, a variety of antique model kit boxes, a mock-up of a modeler’s workbench showing the building of a model ship being made in progress and illustrations that demonstrate how models are constructed. “Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models,” a new exhibition that examines the detailed process of building model ships, will open on Saturday, February 4 at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, located at Pier 86 (46th Street and 12th Avenue) in Manhattan. “Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models” consists of dozens of artifacts including model ships, vintage toy ships, a variety of antique model kit boxes, a mock-up of a modeler’s workbench showing the building of a model ship being made in progress and illustrations that demonstrate how models are constructed. Among the highlights of the exhibit are models of the Battleship New Jersey, which served during WWII, the Korean War and Vietnam, and USS Constitution, the oldest commissioned vessel afloat in the world. The model USS New Jersey measures 112” W x 25” H x 15” D and the model USS Constitution measures 57” W x 43”H x 22” D. A modeler’s workbench offers a peek at the tools of the trade, while World War II nautical toys illustrate children’s fascination with ships. From wartime cardboard models to ships in bottles, the exhibit highlights the dexterity, ingenuity and artistry embodied in these popular collectors’ items. “Ship-Shape: Nautical Scale Models” is made possible through the support of the Susan and Elihu Rose Foundation and will be on display through Sunday, July 8, 2012. The exhibit is free with museum admission. For more information, visit www.intrepidmuseum.org.

9 Scripts from a Nation at War - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 06, 2012 - New York

9 Scripts from a Nation at War (2007), a 10-channel video installation recently acquired by MoMA, marks the first work for which artists Andrea Geyer, Sharon Hayes, Ashley Hunt, Katya Sander, and David Thorne have collaborated. The work responds to knowledge production and communication in the context of the Iraq war since the initial invasion by U.S. military forces in March 2003. The 10 videos comprising the large-scale, spatial installation cast inquiry into the position of the individual amidst roles constructed by war. Each video stages the speaking of a script from the following perspectives: citizen, blogger, correspondent, veteran, student, actor, interviewer, lawyer, detainee, and source. The scripts are enacted by both actors and non-actors, some speaking their own words, some reciting the words of others. Displayed as projections and seated viewing stations in a circuitous, non-narrative structure, the performative videos create a charged environment questioning the implications of war on individual and collective subjectivity.

Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 12, 2012 - Upper West Side

Beyond Planet Earth launches visitors into the exciting future of space exploration as it boldly speculates on humanity's next steps in our solar system and beyond. The exhibition features a full-sized re-creation of a lunar habitat, a model of an elevator reaching up into space, a walk-through diorama of the Martian surface, and challenging interactive simulations. See authentic equipment and models of historic spacecraft from select voyages in the past. Learn about robotic missions that are currently headed deeper and deeper into our own solar system, and what they might reveal. Understand why geologists are so interested in specimens from moons and other planets and what we can learn from them. And explore some possible spectacular missions of the future: mining the Moon, landing on and deflecting a potentially deadly asteroid, or traveling to Mars - and perhaps even establishing colonies there. Is it possible within our lifetime? Will we discover evidence of life, past or present, on another planet? Find out what experts think the future will hold for us beyond planet Earth. Gallery 3, third floor

Newspaper Fiction: The New York Journalism of Djuna Barnes - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 19, 2012 -

Newspaper Fiction: The New York Journalism of Djuna Barnes, 1913-1919 is an exploration of the early journalistic career of American writer and women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes (1892-1982). Though best known for her modernist novels and plays, including Nightwood (1936) and The Antiphon (1958), Barnes spent the period between 1913 and her departure for Europe in 1921 living in New York's Greenwich Village and working as a writer and illustrator for publications including the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Vanity Fair. The product of an unconventional household, she developed an outsider's perspective on "normal" life that served her as an artist, and a liberal sexuality that fit in perfectly with the bohemian lifestyle of Greenwich Village and, later, the lesbian expatriate community in Paris. She used journalism as a means to understand New York City's people and places, and as an excuse to push boundaries and explore society's margins. On view will be forty-five objects, including documentary photographs, drawings, works on paper, and Barnes's stories in newsprint, including eight illustrations she composed to accompany her newspaper columns. Her work suggests a proto-feminist sensibility, emphasizing politics as something experienced on an individual, emotional level.

Weegee: Murder Is My Business - International Center of Photography
Through September 02, 2012 - New York

For an intense decade between 1935 and 1946, Weegee (1899-1968) was one of the most relentlessly inventive figures in American photography. His graphically dramatic and often lurid photographs of New York crimes and news events set the standard for what has become known as tabloid journalism. Freelancing for a variety of New York newspapers and photo agencies, and later working as a stringer for the short-lived liberal daily PM (1940-48), Weegee established a way of combining photographs and texts that was distinctly different from that promoted by other picture magazines, such as LIFE. Utilizing other distribution venues, Weegee also wrote extensively (including his autobiographical Naked City, published in 1945) and organized his own exhibitions at the Photo League. This exhibition draws upon the extensive Weegee Archive at ICP and includes environmental recreations of Weegee's apartment and exhibitions. The exhibition is organized by ICP Chief Curator Brian Wallis.

Contemporary Art from the Collection - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 17, 2014 - New York

Reinstalled to continue the historical sequence found on MoMA's fifth (1880-1940) and fourth (1940-1980) floors, the galleries on the second floor will begin with art of the early 1980s and extend to the present moment, interweaving works in all mediums. Individual galleries will focus on particular topics, ranging from specific locales that nourished influential groups of artists to key strategies shared by diverse practitioners of the same generation. Others will display a single significant installation or artist's project. Like the fifth- and fourth-floor galleries, the second-floor galleries will be periodically reinstalled to reflect the depth and richness of the Museum's collection, and to allow for varying approaches to the wide variety of art produced during the last 30 years. Featured artists include Ashley Bickerton, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring, Martin Kippenberger, Steve McQueen, Senga Nengudi, Doris Salcedo, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Rosemarie Trockel.


Archives:

Related Articles
Most Popular Articles on CGNY
   ACTIVITY PLANNER
Arrival:
Click Here to open the calendar
Departure:
Click Here to open the calendar
Category:
 

Sightseeing Listings
Galleries Listings
Culture/Museums Listings

JUMP TO CITYGUIDE LISTINGS

 · Theater
 · Culture/Museums
 · Sightseeing
 · Galleries

 · Nightlife
 · Family Fun
 · Places to Eat
 · Shopping in NYC

 · Activity Planner
 · Discounts
 · Hotels
 · Maps


 Advertising |  Add a Calendar Event |  Bookmarks |  Company News |  Contact Us | Jobs @ City Guide
 Suggest a Listing

 For More Content Visit: Concierge Choice Awards | Promenade Magazine | NY Metro Parents Magazine
Bar Bat Mitzvah Book | NYC Activities | NYC Dining | NYC Discounts | NYC Events
NYC Museums | NYC Shopping | NYC Theater

Contact us. All Materials Copyright 2014 Davler Media Group, LLC
View Privacy Policy | Terms of Service

NBA Store - $10 Gift Card With Spalding Basketball Purchase
Dave & Buster's Coupon - Times Square - New York City - Free $20 Game Play
HBO Shop Coupon - Buy More, Save More
Sony Store - Free Gift Card With $99+ Purchase
Click Here for More Discounts...
· This Week in NYC
· Bateaux New York - High-Class Dining With the Best Views in NYC
· The Grand Tour - American Museum of Natural History on July 29, 2014
· Target First Saturday - Brooklyn Museum on August 02, 2014
· NYC Parks 2014: New Artwork, Spaces, Hidden Gems
· The Best Live Music and Concert Venues in New York City
· NYC Theater Notes: Priscilla in Pippin, Living on the Fringe & More
· Rock of Ages on Broadway: Nothin’ but a Good Time
· Yankee Stadium Tours: A True Blue Yankees Experience
· Himalayan Happy Hour Shop & Cafe - Rubin Museum of Art on July 23, 2014
Click Here for More News...
Click below to contact our NYC Experts for suggestions on group activities & more:
Dining
Sightseeing
Nightlife
Theater 
Shopping
Transportation
buy tickets | find savings | set your itinerary
Chelsea
Chinatown
East Village
Financial District
Greenwich Village
Harlem
Little Italy
Lower East Side
Midtown East
Midtown West
Soho
Theater District
Times Square
Tribeca
Upper East Side
Upper West Side

LOGIN
 email:

password:


save
 Forgot Password?