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Things to do this week in NYC Jul 26-Aug 2: Museums

July 26, 2014 - by CG Directory Editor

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through July 27, 2014 - New York

The first international loan exhibition to explore the sculptural art produced in the earliest kingdoms of Southeast Asia. From the first millennium onward, powerful kingdoms emerged in the region, embracing much of Indic culture to give political and religious expression to their identities. Early Hinduism (Brahmanism) and Buddhism arrived early, first witnessed by Sanskrit inscriptions, and shortly thereafter by a proliferation of large-scale religious imagery.

Evolution of Our Sense of Smell - American Museum of Natural History
Through July 27, 2014 - New York

Museum visitors will be able to try out the oPhone, a device that plays scent-tagged messages that are sent through a new iPhone application called oSnap. Experts will demonstrate the new technology and lead hands-on activities to explore how smell is processed in humans compared to our primate and hominid relatives. Visitors will test smell perception and scent discrimination by guessing the identity of a variety of scents emitted through the oPhone.

The Grand Tour - American Museum of Natural History
July 29, 2014 - New York

Nearly all of us know we’re the third planet from the Sun, but where are we among the stars in the Milky Way? Do we hold a special place among the planets, stars, and galaxies in the universe? The Grand Tour will answer these questions while you travel from Earth to the most distant objects in the universe. Explore planets, extrasolar planets, nearby stars, and the myriad galaxies that populate the universe while we fly through the 3D Digital Universe Atlas. In one evening, you will experience the entire observable universe and come to a cosmic understanding of where we are and how we came to be.

Uptown Bounce: Summer Nights at 104th and Fifth - El Museo Del Barrio
July 30, 2014 - New York

This summer, El Museo del Barrio and the Museum of the City of New York will present Uptown Bounce: Summer Nights @ 104th & Fifth, the first-ever joint series featuring musical performances, gallery talks, art-making workshops, breakdancing demos, renowned DJs, festive summer drinks, local food vendors, and more. Both museums, located next door to one another at 104th Street and Fifth Avenue, will offer free admission and extended hours. July 30-Roots Uptown Bounce kicks off with a cultural rewind to where it all began! At El Museo del Barrio, stop by for a studio visit in the galleries and a conversation with folkorist Elena Martínez from City Lore, who will illustrate the connections between art and music. Famed Puerto Rican DJ duo D'Marquesina will be on deck spinning old school new school in El Café. Video projections by Erika Harrsh, Leo Castañeda and Geraldo Mercado as well as nightly sidewalk art by Murcielagos Fumando Collective will be featured. At the City Museum, groove to hip hop beats with DJ Tony Touch and Latin rhythms by congas player Chico Cruz on the terrace, then learn about graffiti's influence on hip-hop music through the City As Canvas exhibition. Aug. 6-Throwback Go back in time to the 1980s in New York City! At El Museo del Barrio, hear artist Perla de Leon describe her experience photographing the Bronx in the 1980s. DJ duo D'Marquesina is back spinning throwback hits, and families can enjoy art-making inspired by El Barrio. Video projections by Erika Harrsh, Leo Castañeda and Geraldo Mercado as well as nightly sidewalk art by Murcielagos Fumando Collective will be featured. At the City Museum, celebrate the golden era of hip hop by dancing to classic tracks spun by DJ Grand Master Caz and watching the NBS (Nothing But Skills) Crew show off their breakdancing styles. Aug. 13-The Remix Old school meets new school in the Uptown Bounce finale! At El Museo del Barrio, join a special birthday celebration of the Museum's founder Raphael Montañez Ortiz, who turned 80 years old this past spring, as he speaks about his work and the beginnings of El Museo. The talk will be in conversation with Chon Noriega, Director of Chicano Studies Director at the University of California, Los Angeles. In the spirit of Ortiz' 'destruction movement,' stick around and take your turn smashing a piñata commissioned from artist Melissa Calderon. Video projections by Erika Harrsh, Leo Castañeda and Geraldo Mercado as well as nightly sidewalk art by Murcielagos Fumando Collective will be featured. At the City Museum, join DJ Grand Master Caz on the terrace to sample classic hip hop beats and today's freshest tracks, while dancer the choreography king Kelly Peters presents his Generation X Hip Hop Dance Crew.

Target First Saturday - Brooklyn Museum
August 02, 2014 - Brooklyn

Target First Saturday celebrates the Caribbean communities in and around Brooklyn through music, film, and dance. Highlights include musical group Heritage O.P., soca dance with Candace Thompson, and screenings of the films 2x1 and Mas Man.

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

The first comprehensive retrospective of Sigmar Polke (German, 1941-2010), encompassing Polke's work across all mediums, including painting, photography, film, drawing, prints, and sculpture. Widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of the postwar generation, Polke possessed an irreverent wit that, coupled with his exceptional grasp of the properties of his materials, pushed him to experiment freely with the conventions of art and art history. Constantly searching, Polke studiously avoided any one signature style or medium; his method exemplified the definition of alibi, "in or at another place," which also suggests a deflection of blame. This exhibition places Polke's enormous skepticism of all social, political, and artistic traditions against German history and the country's transformation in the postwar period. Four gallery spaces on MoMA's second floor are dedicated to the exhibition, which comprises approximately 300 works and constitutes one of the largest exhibitions ever organized at the Museum.

Design Motifs in Byzantine Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

Many of the textiles found in Egypt, the southernmost province of the Byzantine Empire, are woven in linen and wool and decorated with a great variety of motifs. Meant to be worn and to decorate domestic and religious spaces, the works on view in this exhibition feature designs that generally refer to abundance and prosperity. Many of the motifs -- among them birds, beasts, and humans; personifications of the seasons; members of the retinue of the wine god Dionysos; and vine scrolls -- originated in classical and pharaonic art, with Christian crosses added in the Byzantine era. Often called Coptic textiles and once thought to have been exclusively Egyptian, these textiles are now recognized as exemplars of motifs popular throughout the Byzantine world. Similar motifs appear on works in other media, including silver, ivory, ceramics, and mosaics, as the photographs accompanying the exhibition demonstrate. Textiles like these were often recovered from the dress and wrappings of the dead found in Byzantine and early Islamic-period burial grounds in Egypt. The dry environment preserved many textiles, although often in a fragmentary state. Decorative elements were at times cut from the larger plain-weave textiles, as interest focused primarily on the interpretation of motifs. The Museum began to acquire these Egyptian textiles soon after its founding in 1870, but owing to their fragility, many of the works shown in this exhibition have not been displayed for decades.

Masterpieces & Curiosities: Diane Arbus's Jewish Giant - The Jewish Museum
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

This exhibition focuses on the subject of Diane Arbus's Jewish Giant at Home with His Parents, Bronx, NY, (1970) using ephemera, sound recordings, and family photos to provide an intimate look into one of Arbus's most recognized yet least understood subjects. Curated by Daniel Palmer, Leon Levy Assistant Curator.

Nalini Malani: Transgressions - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

Nalini Malani (b. 1946 in Karachi, Pakistan; lives and works in Mumbai, India) is one of the foremost contemporary women artists from India. Her practice utilizes allegory and symbolism as metaphors to explore issues relating to gender, class, and race in a post-colonial world. Formally, her work spans the mediums of painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and works on paper. This exhibition will feature Transgressions II (2009), a multimedia installation from the Asia Society Museum Collection. This three-channel video integrates the folk sensibility of traditional shadow plays with new technology, creating a mesmerizing projection of colors and shadows. The exhibition will also feature a selection of Malani's artist books. This presentation will represent the artist's first solo museum exhibition in New York in over a decade.

Other Primary Structures - The Jewish Museum
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

A major exhibition of sculpture from the 1960s featuring the work of artists from Latin America, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe, much of which has rarely been seen in the United States, Other Primary Structures revisits the premise of and builds upon the Museum's seminal 1966 exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors, the first American museum exhibition to survey the style now known as Minimalism. Primary Structures introduced the public to such artists as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Walter De Maria, Robert Morris, and others - figures unknown at the time but soon to become synonymous with a radically new approach to sculpture. Nearly 50 years later, Other Primary Structures revisits this formative moment in art history while also reexamining the period from today's far more global perspective.

Goya and the Altamira Family - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

This exhibition features Goya's four portraits of members of the Altamira family, including the so-called Boy in Red, one of the Metropolitan Museum's most beloved Old Master paintings. Also on view is a fifth Altamira portrait, by Agustin Esteve. This is the first time these family portraits - now dispersed in public and private collections in Spain and the United States - will be seen together as a group.

Inspired by Iran Modern: Work by New York City Students - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

A series of exhibitions that presents the work of New York City students created in response to the great artistic traditions of Asia. This year the exhibition presents student artwork inspired by the Asia Society fall 2013 exhibition Iran Modern.

In a World of Their Own: Coney Island Photographs by Aaron Rose - Museum of the City of New York
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

When Aaron Rose began photographing Coney Island in 1961, he bypassed the bluster of the theme parks and sideshows for the more intimate interactions of beach dwellers. Wielding his camera surreptitiously, observing as if from a neighboring blanket, Rose documented a "sun-baked melting pot" of beachgoers of all ages, ethnicities, and walks of life, each one utterly unselfconscious, absorbed in a world of his or her own.

Shiva Ahmadi: In Focus - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

Asia Society Museum has invited the artist Shiva Ahmadi to create a new work as part of its ongoing In Focus series. Ahmadi's practice is informed by the tradition of miniature painting. Her jewel-like compositions feature allegorical narratives that serve as a critique of contemporary political conflicts and the abuses of power that accompany them. For this exhibition the artist will present Lotus, a new single-channel animation, commissioned by Asia Society and based on two traditional Buddhas from the Asia Society Museum Collection. This new work will be Ahmadi's first significant animation to date and marks an important shift in her practice.

SxSE: Selections from the Asia Society Museum Collection - Asia Society and Museum
Through August 03, 2014 - New York

SxSE: Selections from the Asia Society Museum Collection brings together video artworks created since 2000 by South and Southeast Asian artists reflecting current artistic trends in the region. Many of the works included in the exhibition focus on the socioeconomic and environmental impact rapid urbanization has had on local communities.

Presencia: Works from El Museo's Permanent Collection - El Museo Del Barrio
Through August 09, 2014 - New York

The most recent exhibition of work from El Museo's permanent collection focuses on ideas of presence and its antithesis, absence. This theme is explored through photography, painting, prints, drawings, masks, and other objects. The exhibition investigates the visibility and invisibility of the human form through the presentation of the body in literal and conceptual ways. The featured artists play with their figures, showing bodies revealed and obscured, evidently displayed or camouflaged

Charles James: Beyond Fashion - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 10, 2014 - New York

The retrospective exhibition features approximately 100 of the most notable designs produced by James over the course of his career, from 1929 until his death in 1978. The first-floor special exhibition galleries spotlight the glamour and resplendent architecture of James's ball gowns from the 1930s through 1950s with an elegant tableau celebrating such renowned clients of his as Austine Hearst, Millicent Rogers, and Dominique de Menil.

The Power of Poison - American Museum of Natural History
Through August 10, 2014 - New York

Cleopatra was said to prefer the bite of an asp, while the powerful Borgia family dispatched their enemies with arsenic in Renaissance Italy. For centuries, humans have marveled at the secrets of poisons and sought to harness their toxic powers -- and this exhibition will explore both the biological basics of poison and the ways in which people have confronted its perils and potential. Approaching poison from several different perspectives -- as a dynamic defense system used by animals locked in evolutionary arms races with predators; as a compelling thread that runs through familiar legends, myths, and fables; as a series of mysteries visitors encounter and solve, including what suddenly poisoned Captain James Cook and two naturalists aboard his ship in the autumn of 1774; and as a promising source for powerful medical treatments -- The Power of Poison brings into sharp focus this captivating topic.

Ai Weiwei: According to What? - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 10, 2014 - Brooklyn

The first North American survey of the work of provocative Chinese conceptual artist, sculptor, photographer, filmmaker, and activist Ai Weiwei. This will be the first large-scale museum exhibition of Ai's work in New York and the final presentation on the exhibition's tour. The Brooklyn Museum will include several major works not seen in previous venues. Included among the new material is S.A.C.R.E.D., making its first appearance in North America since it debuted to critical acclaim during the Venice Biennale in 2013. Ai created this monumental work in response to his 81-day imprisonment by Chinese authorities in 2011. Each of the six iron boxes that make up the piece contains lifelike fiberglass dioramas of detailed scenes painstakingly reproduced from memory. The work documents and reveals the most painful and intimate moments of Ai's imprisonment, from periods of interrogation to such daily activities as eating, sleeping, showering, and using the toilet. The Brooklyn presentation will also feature a stunning site-specific installation of bicycles. This installation is part of a series of works by Ai using bicycles that is related to his childhood experience and to the bicycle's relevance to the lives of most Chinese people. Also making its debut is an installation of photographs and the personal belongings of Ye Haiyan, a women's rights activist who has been systematically targeted by authorities for her advocacy on behalf of female Chinese sex workers and evicted from her home numerous times. The exhibition will also premiere Stay Home!-- Ai's documentary about Liu Ximei, who contracted AIDS as a child after being given an HIV-contaminated blood transfusion at a Chinese hospital.

Ramallah/New York - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 15, 2014 - New York

In conjunction with Documentary Fortnight, Emily Jacir's two-channel video work Ramallah/New York (2004-05), which is part of MoMA's collection, will be installed in The Ronald S. and Jo Carole Lauder Building lobby. Informed by the artist's experience of living in Ramallah and New York between 1999 and 2004, the work juxtaposes images of everyday interior spaces (e.g., travel agencies, hair salons, delis) in both cities to examine the transcendence of place beyond official borders.

Self-Taught Genius: Treasures from the American Folk Art Museum - American Folk Art Museum
Through August 17, 2014 - New York

What is a self-taught genius? During the post-Revolutionary era in the newly formed United States, this characterization took on profound dimensions that were pivotal to the development of a start-up nation conceived on an experimental model: all of the nation's citizens were self-taught Americans. Self-Taught Genius, comprising more than one hundred works of art from the museum's collection, considers the changing implications of "self-taught" in the United States, from a deeply entrenched and widespread culture of self-education in the early national period to its usage today to describe artists working outside the art historical canon. The exhibition frames the continuum of American folk art through the concept of "self-taught genius," an enduring term that, like the artworks themselves, has changed dramatically over time: the early American folk art we so admire today was made by the self-taught artists of the past.

Shyu Ruey-Shiann: One Kind of Behavior - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through August 17, 2014 - Bronx

Shyu Ruey-Shiann works with different materials and media to explore themes related to our environment. The installation One Kind of Behavior is inspired by the quasi-mechanical movements of creatures such as the hermit crabs. The artist sees in the random opening and closing of their shells on the beach, a stark contrast with contemporary society where things move at high speed. Additionally, the fact that hermit crabs occupy shells discarded by other species becomes another source of interest to the artist, who sees in this special relationship a metaphor for our human condition. Contrasting man and animal behavior, One Kind of Behavior asks us to consider the environmental consequences of our mechanical impulses on nature.

Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 17, 2014 - New York

Featuring more than 40 outstanding examples of calligraphy from the collection of Jerry Yang and his wife, Akiko Yamazaki, created by leading artists of the Yuan (1271-1368), Ming (1368-1644), and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. The selection of artworks and their interpretation in the galleries are intended to speak to beginners and specialists alike, using calligraphy of the highest quality to introduce key concepts of format, script type, and style.

Making Pottery Art: The Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection of French Ceramics (ca. 1880-1910) - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through August 18, 2014 - New York

Technically experimental and aesthetically ambitious, the vases made by French potters in the years around 1900 pushed the boundaries of the ceramic medium. The recently acquired Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection of European Art Pottery includes pieces by the master ceramists Ernest Chaplet, Auguste Delaherche, and Jean Carries, works of imposing size, beautiful in shape, and dazzling in their glazes. These works will be shown with others that inspired them, ranging from Asian ceramics to German stoneware.

Sami Stories: Art and Identity of an Arctic People - Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America
Through August 23, 2014 - New York

Curated by the Tromso University Museum and Northern Norway Art Museum, Sami Stories is a landmark exhibition examining the history, identity, politics, and visual culture of the Sami, the indigenous people of Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Russia's Kola Peninsula. Featuring a selection of contemporary artworks and traditional duodji (handicraft) - including a reindeer milk scoop, shaman's drum, cradle, and a selection of hats and dolls - the exhibition offers visitors an overview of Sami history and visual culture from the 17th century to the present.

Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the American Civil War - New-York Historical Society
Through August 24, 2014 - New York

To mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War (1861-1865), the New-York Historical Society presents a groundbreaking traveling exhibition, Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the American Civil War, organized by the American Textile History Museum. The exhibition uses quilts, textiles, clothing, and other artifacts to connect deeply moving and insightful personal stories about the war, its causes, and its aftermath with the broader national context and public history.

Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948-1988 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through August 24, 2014 - New York

The Museum of Modern Art presents a major retrospective devoted to the art of Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988), the first comprehensive exhibition in North America of her work. Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948-1988 comprises nearly 300 works made between the late 1940s and her death in 1988. Drawn from public and private collections, including MoMA's own, this survey is organized around three key themes: abstraction, Neo-Concretism, and the "abandonment" of art. Each of these axes anchors a significant concept or a constellation of works that mark a definitive step in Clark's career. While Clark's legacy in Brazil is profound, this exhibition draws international attention to her work. By bringing together all parts of her radical production, the exhibition seeks to reintroduce her into current discourses of abstraction, participation, and a therapeutic art practice.

Masters of Disguise: The World of Camouflage - Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
Through August 24, 2014 - New York

For many animals, the ability to hide in plain sight or look like something entirely different is necessary for survival. "Masters of Disguise: The World of Camouflage" explores the art and science of camouflage in the natural world, as well as its cultural adaptations and how the military has utilized these visual techniques in combat. Using digital imagery, artifacts and interactive elements, visitors will explore color, shade, shapes, and learn how they can fool the eye.

Swoon: Submerged Motherlands - Brooklyn Museum
Through August 24, 2014 - Brooklyn

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon celebrates everyday people and explores social and environmental issues with her signature paper portraits and figurative installations. She is best known for her large, intricately-cut prints wheat pasted to industrial buildings in Brooklyn and Manhattan. For this exhibition, Swoon creates a site-specific installation in our rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

Ladies of the House: History from a Feminine Perspective - Morris-Jumel Mansion Museum
Through August 25, 2014 - New York

The Morris-Jumel Mansion is pleased to present Ladies of the House: History from a Feminine Perspective, featuring photography by Trish Mayo as part of our Contemporary Meets Colonial exhibition series. Throughout the Mansion's history women have had a strong presence. The Mansion was built in 1765 for Mary Philipse, by her husband Colonel Roger Morris as a wedding present. The home's longest owner, Eliza Jumel, lived in the Mansion from 1810 to 1865, and was known as one of the wealthiest women in New York. In 1904, the Washington's Headquarters Association, formed by four chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution, began to operate the Mansion as a museum. The most famous and royal visitor of the Mansion, Queen Elizabeth II, visited in 1976. Today, the female presence in the Mansion continues through many costumed events and performance pieces, which celebrate the vibrant history and the lives of the fascinating women of the Mansion. Artist, Trish Mayo has captured many of the women at these events with her camera. Ladies of the House features six original photographs, which were digitally manipulated to recall nineteenth century photographs, such as daguerreotypes, tintypes, and ambrotypes. As part of this exhibition, Mayo and curatorial assistant, Jasmine Helm have selected prints and photographs from the Mansion's archives—on view for the first time—to showcase women's contributions throughout the Morris-Jumel Mansion's history as a private residence and museum.

Lights, Camera, Astoria - Museum of the Moving Image
Through August 31, 2014 - Astoria

This exhibition traces the fascinating history of the Astoria Studio complex, which has been at the heart of filmmaking in New York City since 1920. The studio site was the east-coast home of Paramount Pictures in the silent and early talking-picture eras, a center for independent filmmaking in the 1930s, and the U.S. Army Pictorial Center from World War II into the Cold War era. After falling into disrepair in the early 1970s, the site has become a thriving cultural hub that includes Kaufman Astoria Studios and Museum of the Moving Image. Using film stills, behind-the-scenes photographs, oral histories, film clips, and posters, the exhibition explores the rich legacy and renaissance of the studio complex. With material from silent-era films featuring Rudolph Valentino, early talking films starring the Marx Brothers, World War II training and propaganda films, such modern classics as The Age of Innocence, and television shows like Sesame Street, The Cosby Show, and Nurse Jackie, the exhibition reveals the significant role that the Astoria studio continues to play in energizing its surrounding community and making moving image history.

in print / imprint: works from the permanent collection - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through August 31, 2014 - Bronx

Over the course of its 40-year history, the Bronx Museum has drawn together a significant collection of prints and graphic-art works, guided by its mission to give visibility to artists of African, Asian, and Latin American descent. For these artists, the print medium has been an invaluable tool for channeling their aesthetic and political concerns. Due to its mass reproducibility, economy, ease of distribution, and collaborative character, printmaking has long been considered a vehicle for social agency and has played a major role in politically mobilizing different communities and constituencies.

The World Comes to Queens: Films from the World's Fairs - Museum of the Moving Image
Through August 31, 2014 - Astoria

Nearly 100 million people came to Queens for two World's Fairs that opened 25 years apart, in 1939 and 1964. On the eve of World War II, the 1939-1940 fair looked to the future, with the optimistic slogan 'the Dawn of a New Day.' The 1964-1965 fair, organized by Robert Moses, was largely a celebration of mid-century American industry, symbolized by the twelve-story-high stainless steel Unisphere built by U.S. Steel. Sponsored films made for the fairs capture the excitement and ingenuity behind the fairs while also revealing the goals of the companies behind them. Films to be shown continuously in the Video Screening Amphitheater, in excerpts or their entirety, include The Middleton Family at the New York World's Fair and To New Horizons from 1939, and Sinclair at the World's Fair, World's Fair Report with Lowell Thomas, To The Fair, and Unisphere: The Biggest World on Earth from 1964.

Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through September 01, 2014 - New York

The first comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism to be presented in the United States, this multidisciplinary exhibition examines the historical sweep of the movement from its inception with F. T. Marinetti's Futurist manifesto in 1909 through its demise at the end of World War II.

Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937 - Neue Galerie
Through September 01, 2014 - New York

The first major museum exhibition devoted to the infamous display of modern art by the Nazis since the presentation originated by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1991. The exhibition contrasts so-called "degenerate" art with officially sanctioned art of the period, while providing the historical and intellectual context of the notorious Munich exhibition in 1937.

Lucas Samaras: Offerings from a Restless Soul - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 01, 2014 - New York

Featuring over 60 works drawn from The Met's rich collection of the highly idiosyncratic body of work made by Lucas Samaras. The installation includes a new gift of 17 objects that range from Samaras' abstract work of the 1960s to his recent digitally based pieces. Designed with the input of the artist, the installation is installed in both the north and south mezzanine galleries in the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing for modern and contemporary art.

Jasper Johns: Regrets - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 01, 2014 - New York

Jasper Johns emerged as a leading voice in American art in the late-1950s with paintings of iconic motifs such as flags, targets, and numbers. He has since developed a body of work of extraordinary narrative complexity and technical virtuosity. This exhibition premieres his most recent series of paintings, drawings, and prints, created over the last year and a half.

Posters of the Vienna Secession, 1898-1918 - Neue Galerie
Through September 01, 2014 - New York

A special exhibition on posters of the Vienna Secession, focusing on the period from 1898 to 1918. The Vienna Secession was a groundbreaking artists' association, established in 1897 under the presidency of Gustav Klimt.

Italian Renaissance Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 01, 2014 - New York

Featuring masterpieces of Central and Southern Italian drawing spanning the 15th and 16th centuries. Among the 42 works, Florentine drawings are especially well represented by such celebrated Renaissance masters as Leonardo da Vinci and Antonio Pollaiuolo, while among the Southern Italian examples is a rare sheet attributed to Antonello da Messina.

Museum Starter Kit: Open With Care - El Museo Del Barrio
Through September 06, 2014 - New York

This exhibition explores the significance of the creation of El Museo by focusing on works of art made by Raphael Montañez Ortiz, as the artist turns 80 this year. Among the works on display by our founder will be his powerful Archaeological Find #21: The Aftermath (1961), a destroyed sofa as sculpture from 1961 that is a signature of the artist's work. Also prominent in this gallery will be his Maya Zemí I and Maya Zemí II, pyramid-shaped cardboard sculptures that illustrate his profound interest in connecting the historic indigenous cultures of the Caribbean and Mesoamerica.

Robert Heinecken: Object Matter - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 07, 2014 - New York

This survey exhibition covers five decades of the artist's remarkable, unique practice, from the early 1960s through the late 1990s. Although Heinecken was prolific, this exhibition is a focused presentation of his major works, emphasizing early experiments that investigated technique and materiality and sought to destabilize the very definition of photography. Heinecken's innovative and diverse experimentation resonates deeply with current artistic practice, and his prescient exploration of the definition of photography, the possibilities of appropriation, and the limitations of artistic categories is as relevant today as it was 50 years ago.

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America's Great Public Spaces - Museum of the City of New York
Through September 07, 2014 - New York

Throughout the five boroughs are more than 200 long-overlooked marvels of engineering and architectural beauty - the interlocking tile vaults built by Spanish immigrants Rafael Guastavino, Sr. (1842-1908), and his son, Rafael Jr. (1872-1950). The system of structural tile vaults developed by the Guastavinos - lightweight, fireproof, low-maintenance, and capable of supporting significant loads - was used by leading architects of the day, including McKim, Mead & White and Carrere and Hastings. Ellis Island's Immigration Hall, Carnegie Hall, the Bronx Zoo's Elephant House, and Grand Central Terminal all contain Guastavino vaults. Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America's Great Public Spaces is the first major exhibition to explore the innovations the Guastavino Fireproof Construction Company (1889-1962) brought to the science and art of building. It was originally organized by MIT's John Ochensdorf, who is a MacArthur Fellow; it is being expanded here to include some 20 key Guastavino spaces in the five boroughs.

A Dialogue with Nature: Romantic Landscapes from Britain and Germany - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 07, 2014 - New York

Organized by the Morgan and London's Courtauld Gallery, A Dialogue with Nature explores aspects of Romantic landscape drawing in Britain and Germany from the 1760s to 1840s. The exhibition draws upon the strengths of both collections - the Morgan's exceptional group of German drawings and The Courtauld Gallery's extensive holdings of British works - in order to consider points of commonality and divergence between the two distinctive schools. Taken together, these drawings exemplify Caspar David Friedrich's understanding of Romantic landscape draftsmanship as "a dialogue with Nature." The exhibition will include thirty-seven works that represent the two central elements of the Romantic conception of landscape: close observation of the natural world and the importance of the imagination. On view will be works by such celebrated artists as Thomas Gainsborough, J.M.W. Turner, Caspar David Friedrich, John Constable, Franz Kobell, Paul Sandby, Joseph Anton Koch, J. C. Dahl, and Samuel Palmer.

Re: Collection - Museum of Arts & Design
Through September 07, 2014 - New York

MAD celebrates the fifth anniversary of its move to 2 Columbus Circle with this special exhibition that will survey Chief Curator David McFadden's 16 years at MAD through objects acquired during his tenure. During McFadden's years at MAD, the permanent collection has grown from 800 objects to more than 3,000; in the past 5 years alone, since MAD's move to 2 Columbus Circle, approximately 730 objects that exemplify the imaginative transformation of materials have been added to the collection.

The Flowering of Edo Period Painting: Japanese Masterworks from the Feinberg Collection - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 07, 2014 - New York

Displaying exemplary works from painting schools that arose in Japan in the 17th and 18th centuries, this exhibition allows viewers to discover how Japanese painting evolved from the traditional modes of Chinese and Japanese (Yamato-e) styles that had prevailed through medieval times. More than 90 paintings - including 12 sets of folding screens and a number of hanging scrolls - will be exhibited in two rotations, each consisting of approximately 45 paintings. Rather than focus on the orthodox output of the Tosa and Kano ateliers, which dominated artistic production in the late medieval period, The Flowering of Edo Period Painting will highlight the new, exuberant styles of the Rinpa, Nanga, Maruyama-Shijo, and Ukiyo-e schools, as well as independent painters of the Edo period.

Gatsby to Garp: Modern Masterpieces from the Carter Burden Collection - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 07, 2014 - New York

Between 1973 and 1996 Carter Burden, a cultural benefactor and former New York City councilman, assembled the greatest collection of modern American literature in private hands. This exhibition brings together nearly 100 outstanding works from the collection, including first editions, manuscripts, letters, and revised galley proofs. Authors featured in this unparalleled exhibition are some of the 20th century's most celebrated - William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Allen Ginsberg, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, John Irving, Henry James, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, J. D. Salinger, Gertrude Stein, John Steinbeck, John Updike, Tennessee Williams, and Richard Wright, among others.

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World's Fair - Queens Museum of Art
Through September 07, 2014 - Queens

50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World's Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion's exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials' direction with silver paint a few days later. When the Fair opened to the public, all that was visible was a large silver square. Later in the summer of 1964, Warhol produced another set of the Most Wanted Men paintings with the screens he had used to make the mural and nine of these are assembled in New York for the first time since their creation, forming the core of the 175 or so objects in the exhibition.

Bodies in Balance - Rubin Museum of Art
Through September 08, 2014 - New York

Bodies in Balance presents the complex, integrated medical, spiritual, and artistic system of Tibetan medicine, providing a new perspective on the relationship between mind, body, and sustained wellbeing. The first major exhibition to examine Tibetan medicine through its diverse visual history, the exhibition illuminates how this healing system has been passed down over a millennium and remains relevant to our 21st-century lives.

Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography - Museum of Arts & Design
Through September 14, 2014 - New York

This exhibit explores the compelling personal, social, cultural, and artistic issues being addressed today through the pairing of two dynamic visual art forms: studio jewelry and photography -- or photo-jewelry.

Miracles in Miniature: The Art of the Master of Claude de France - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 14, 2014 - New York

The Master of Claude de France was one of the last great French illuminators. His was a fine and delicate style, characterized by the use of subtle lilacs, mauves and roses, juxtaposed with chartreuse and royal blue -- all applied in tiny, almost invisible brushstrokes. The Claude Master flourished in Tours (in the Loire valley) for only about twelve years (ca. 1508-1520), leaving behind a small but exceptional oeuvre. Over the last several years, the Morgan has acquired a critical mass of the Claude Master's work, of which nearly two dozen items will be featured in this exhibition. The centerpiece is the Prayer Book of Claude de France, one of two tiny, jewel-like manuscripts that he painted for the queen of France and after which the artist was named. The Prayer Book was a personal commission by Queen Claude (first wife of King Francois I) around the time of her coronation in 1517. The manuscript measures a mere 2 3/4 by 2 inches, but it includes an amazing 132 miniatures. Encoded within the tiny book are images that reflect the queen's private anxieties, including her fear that she might have inherited from her mother, Anne de Bretagne (twice queen of France), the inability to bear healthy sons. Visitors will have the opportunity to access all of the Prayer Book's miniatures via an iPad in the gallery. Also on view will be twelve newly discovered calendar miniatures by the Claude Master, which the Morgan recently acquired. These works will be complimented by loans from private collectors and from the Free Library of Philadelphia. Manuscripts by Jean Bourdichon, the Claude Master's teacher, and by Jean Poyer and Jacques Ravaud, two artists active in Tours who influenced him, will also be displayed.

Marks of Genius: Treasures of the Bodleian Library - Morgan Library & Museum
Through September 14, 2014 - New York

Marks of Genius presents some of the greatest achievements of human creativity, from the beginning of recorded information up to the industrial era, as preserved in the incomparable collections of Oxford University's Bodleian Library. The exhibition features approximately sixty rare and exceptional objects from diverse disciplines that serve as points of departure for exploring some of the fundamental meanings of genius. The ways in which genius has been cultivated, recognized, and venerated will be explored through such works as early manuscripts of Euclid's Elementa and Gregory I's Regular Pastoralis, the oldest book written in English; an Arabic manuscript book of constellations; a unique papyri of Sappho's poems; the copyright deposit copy of Shakespeare's First Folio; a thirteenth-century manuscript of the Magna Carta; the definitive account of Aztec civilization; the manuscript of Handel's Messiah; J.R.R. Tolkien's drawings for The Hobbit; and Mary Shelley's manuscript draft of Frankenstein.

Annual 2014: Redefining Tradition - National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts
Through September 14, 2014 - New York

The exhibit brings together multiple generations of National Academicians and creates a constellation that illuminates affinities, connections, differences, and most importantly a relevant continuum of American art and architecture.

Robert Davidson: Abstract Impulse - National Museum of the American Indian
Through September 14, 2014 - New York

The first major U.S. exhibition of works by Haida artist Robert Davidson, a pivotal figure in the Northwest Coast Native art renaissance since 1969, when he erected the first totem pole in his ancestral Massett village since the 1880s. For more than 40 years, Davidson has mastered Haida art traditions by studying the great works of his great-grandfather Charles Edenshaw and others. More recently, Davidson has interjected his own interpretation of the old forms with forays into abstraction, explored in boldly minimalistic easel paintings, graphic works, and sculpture, where images are pared to essential lines, elemental shapes, and strong colors. Robert Davidson: Abstract Impulse features 45 paintings, sculptures, and prints created since 2005, as well as key images from earlier in the artist's career that show Davidson's evolution toward an elemental language of form.

Designing Modern Women, 1890s-1990s - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 21, 2014 - New York

Modern design of the 20th century was profoundly shaped and enhanced by the creativity of women -- as muses of modernity and shapers of new ways of living, and as designers, patrons, performers, and educators. This installation, drawn entirely from MoMA's collection, celebrates the diversity and vitality of individual artists' engagement in the modern world, from Loie Fuller's pulsating turn-of-the-century performances to Paula Scher's deconstructivist graphics of the 1990s. Highlights include the first display of a newly conserved kitchen by Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier (1952) from the Unite d'Habitation housing project; furniture and designs by Lilly Reich, Eileen Gray, Eva Zeisel, Ray Eames, Lella Vignelli, and Denise Scott Brown; textiles by Anni Albers and Eszter Haraszty; ceramics by Lucy Rie; a display of 1960s psychedelic concert posters by graphic designer Bonnie Maclean; and a never-before-seen selection of posters and graphic material from the punk era, featuring women designers, photographers, or performers. The gallery's "graphics corner" first explores the changing role and visual imagery of The New Woman through a selection of posters created between 1890 and 1938; in April 2014 the focus will shift to Women at War, an examination of the iconography and varied roles of women in times of conflict, commemorating the centennial of the outbreak of World War I.

City as Canvas - Museum of the City of New York
Through September 21, 2014 - New York

City as Canvas provides a visual account of graffiti and street art in New York City during the 1970s and 80s, showcasing works from the pioneering collection of Martin Wong (1946-1999). Wong, a noted East Village artist in the 1980s and friend to many graffiti writers, amassed a collection of hundreds of works on paper and canvas, which he donated to the City Museum in 1994. This exhibition, which showcases these works for the first time, traces the origins of this urban self-expression and the era of "outlaw" street art, which became a worldwide cultural phenomenon. It features examples of paintings and sketch book work by artists including Keith Haring, Lee Quinones, Lady Pink, Futura 2000, among many others.

'I Live. Send Help.' 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee - New-York Historical Society
Through September 21, 2014 - New York

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) was founded in New York City in 1914 as a response to the plight of Jews in Europe and Palestine at the outset of World War I. Since then, JDC has become a premiere humanitarian organization helping Jews and non-Jews the world over in times of need. On the occasion of its 100 year anniversary, this exhibition will recount the history of the JDC from its creation by Jacob Schiff and Henry Morgenthau Sr. to its most recent relief activities rebuilding Jewish communities of the former Soviet Union and in aiding Filipinos in the wake of the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan. Included in this celebratory exhibition will be photographs, objects, and films that bring the JDC's poignant stories to life.

Mel Bochner: Strong Language - The Jewish Museum
Through September 21, 2014 - New York

An in-depth survey of Bochner's career-long fascination with the cerebral and visual associations of words. The exhibition will include over 70 text-based works. Among the highlights are his mid-1960s Portrait Drawings, never before exhibited in New York, and paintings from the last decade using synonyms appropriated from the latest edition of Roget's Thesaurus. Bochner was inspired by the Thesaurus' new permissiveness to broaden his linguistic references juxtaposing vernacular against proper, formal against vulgar, high against low. A founding figure of the Conceptual Art movement of the 1960s, his Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art is considered to be the first Conceptual Art exhibition. Mel Bochner (b. 1940) emerged at a time when young artists considered painting exhausted. A pioneer in incorporating language into visual art, Bochner has taken an unusual turn toward painterly expressiveness during the past two decades. Mel Bochner: Strong Language will reveal the artist's longstanding engagement with the possibilities of language as image, medium, and content. Visitors will be able to see a broad selection ranging from often witty early conceptual works to vibrantly colored and lushly executed recent paintings.

Garry Winogrand - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 21, 2014 - New York

The first retrospective in 25 years of work by Garry Winogrand (1928-1984) - the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s - brings together more than 175 of the artist's most iconic images, a trove of unseen prints, and even Winogrand's famed series of photos made at the Metropolitan Museum in 1969 when the Museum celebrated its centennial. This exhibition offers a rigorous overview of Winogrand's complete working life and reveals for the first time the full sweep of his career.

Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden - Museum of Biblical Art
Through September 28, 2014 - New York

A look at the biblical story of the Garden of Eden and how it has inspired leading artists of today, both directly and indirectly. Powerful, universal themes addressed include Utopia/Dystopia or Before the Fall/After the Fall. The elusive concept of the "perfect garden" is also examined, as is the issue of biodiversity, an implicit central theme of the Garden of Eden. Artists in the exhibition - including Lynn Aldrich, Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Mark Dion, Barnaby Furnas, Adam Fuss, Dana Sherwood, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Mary Temple - consider the wealth of animal and plant life on Earth, and in particular, the contemporary relationship between humankind and nature.

Here and Elsewhere - New Museum
Through September 28, 2014 - New York

One of the most comprehensive presentations of contemporary art from and about the Arab world in the US to date, and featuring groundbreaking work by emerging, established, and under-recognized artists. Rather than presenting a portrait of the region in broad strokes, this exhibition highlights and elucidates the complex social, political, and cultural forces that have resulted in distinct artistic communities and dialogues throughout the region and beyond.

Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago's Early Work, 1963-74 - Brooklyn Museum
Through September 28, 2014 - Brooklyn

Before making her widely known and iconic feminist work of the 1970s, 1980s, and beyond, Judy Chicago explored painting, sculpture, and environmental performance, often using innovative industrial techniques and materials, including auto body painting and pyrotechnics. This survey includes approximately 60 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and videos, including documentation of performances, spanning 1963 to 1974. On view are important early sculptures, including Rainbow Picket (1964), which blend minimalist forms and bold color choices, and a range of vibrant paintings and sculptures made with sprayed acrylic lacquer, a material typically used for decorating cars.

Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 28, 2014 - New York

The exhibition brings together recently acquired contemporary works by two generations of contemporary artists, including Sol LeWitt, Richard Serra with Nancy Holt, Allen Ruppersberg, Seth Price, Simryn Gill, Liz Deschenes, Charles Gaines, Emily Roysdon, Matt Mullican, Hanne Darboven, and Peter Downsbrough.

Ray Johnson Designs - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 29, 2014 - New York

The art of Ray Johnson was rooted in his constant practice of correspondence. He dispersed a copious amount of collages and other printed matter through the mail to friends and colleagues. The Museum of Modern Art Library received materials in the mail from Ray Johnson from the 1950s until his death in 1995. This exhibition focuses on Johnson's early printed materials, especially his promotional flyers for his work as a graphic designer and illustrator. These flyers were some of the first materials that the MoMA Library received from Johnson and they prefigure the graphic motifs and word play that remained central to his later art work. Publications that included Johnson's design work from this period, including book jacket designs for publishers such as New Directions, The Jargon Society, and City Lights, are also featured.

The Fed at 100 - Museum of American Finance
Through October 01, 2014 - New York

"The Fed at 100" illuminates the complex workings of the nation's central bank on its centennial anniversary and explores the pivotal role the Federal Reserve has played throughout the history of American finance. The Museum's largest exhibition to date, "The Fed at 100" encompasses three galleries and a theater.

Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through October 01, 2014 - New York

Organized by Pablo Leon de la Barra, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Latin America, the exhibition features contemporary works by 37 artists and collaborative duos from 16 countries, including Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico (United States), Uruguay, and Venezuela.

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Vision: In Pursuit of the Best in the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through October 05, 2014 - New York

The Met's Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (AAOA) celebrates the genesis of its permanent collection with this exhibition. It is organized to mark the 60th anniversary of the establishment of The Museum of Primitive Art, the direct precursor to AAOA. The Museum of Primitive Art was a pioneering cultural institution that featured Nelson Rockefeller's non-Western art collection. The announcement by Rockefeller of an agreement to transfer his collection to the Metropolitan was made in 1969 and in January 1982 the Michael C. Rockefeller Wing opened to the public. The exhibition highlights some 50 masterpieces and many unpublished documents selected from the more than 3,000 Rockefeller gifts encompassing three areas - Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; it will reveal Mr. Rockefeller's vision for The Museum of Primitive Art, the first institution dedicated entirely to the artistic excellence of the arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.

A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through October 05, 2014 - New York

Bringing together photographs, films, videos, and works in other mediums, A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio examines the ways in which photographers and artists using photography have worked and experimented within the four walls of the studio space, from photography's inception to today. Featuring both new acquisitions and works from the Museum's collection that have not been on view in recent years, A World of Its Own includes approximately 200 works, by artists such as Berenice Abbott, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Brătescu, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston.

Natural Histories - American Museum of Natural History
Through October 12, 2014 - New York

Inspired by the book Natural Histories: Extraordinary Rare Book Selections from the American Museum of Natural History Library, published in October 2012, this exhibition will include reproductions from more than 20 rare and beautifully illustrated scientific works. The works featured in Natural Histories span from the 16th century to the early 20th century and cover scientific disciplines from anthropology to astronomy to zoology. Reproductions of rare scientific illustrations that will be displayed in the gallery include a rhinoceros taken directly from Albrecht Durer's 1515 woodcut, lithographs of the mysterious aye-aye lemur from Sir Richard Owen's Monograph on the Aye-aye, and Robert Hooke's engraved images of what were once startling microscopic views of familiar items and animals in Micrographia.

NYC Makers - The MAD Biennial - Museum of Arts & Design
Through October 12, 2014 - New York

The Museum of Arts and Design transforms itself into a nexus for NYC's leading makers -- artists, artisans, and designers -- through this first exhibition to be organized under the leadership of MAD's new director Glenn Adamson. Exemplifying the Museum's commitment to making across all creative fields, the exhibition draws together approximately 100 works by a diverse range of highly skilled and inventive individuals from throughout the five boroughs, from established artists and designers, to expert artisans who work behind the scenes to create objects and experiences that we encounter on a daily basis. Marking the first in a series of exhibitions examining the culture of making in urban communities, the exhibition highlights the interconnected web of cultural production in New York City today and the importance of craft in contemporary life.

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through October 19, 2014 - New York

The Whitney's final exhibition in their building on the Upper East Side is a once-in-a-lifetime retrospective of the famed artist, which will occupy most of the building's space.

Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans - New-York Historical Society
Through October 19, 2014 - New York

To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline's publication, the New-York Historical Society honors the beloved schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks. In addition to drawings from all six Madeline books, the exhibition features Bemelmans' drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book.

Conceptions of Space: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Architecture - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through October 19, 2014 - New York

Focusing on recent acquisitions in MoMA's Department of Architecture and Design, Conceptions of Space addresses how contemporary architects continue to embrace spatial creation as a fundamental focus of their work. The exhibition reveals how, beyond formal traits and functional needs, the conception and articulation of architectural space still defines architecture as an artistic endeavor, and a response to wider cultural issues.

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989 - Studio Museum in Harlem
Through October 26, 2014 - New York

The first museum survey of Los Angeles�based conceptual artist Charles Gaines's early work. The exhibition features 75 works from the beginning of a singular career that now spans four decades.

The Pre-Raphaelite Legacy: British Art and Design from the Metropolitan's Collection - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through October 26, 2014 - New York

Young and impassioned, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood sought to revitalize mid-nineteenth-century British painting with the sincerity and vivid intensity they admired in medieval and early Renaissance art. Although the Brotherhood was short-lived, its influence was profound. This exhibition will highlight the second wave of the Pre-Raphaelite movement as it unfolded from the 1860s through the 1890s, focusing on the key figures Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Some thirty works from across the Museum's collections - including paintings, drawings, furniture, textiles, prints, and illustrated books, many of them rarely on view and united for the first time - demonstrate the enduring impact of Pre-Raphaelite ideals as they were adapted by different artists and developed across a range of media. At a time of renewed appreciation for art of the Victorian age, the installation will direct fresh attention toward the Metropolitan's little-known holdings in this important area.

Worlding - Queens Museum of Art
Through October 31, 2014 - Queens

An exhibition inspired by the Panorama of the City of New York, the 9,355-square-foot architectural model of New York City commissioned by the controversial master builder Robert Moses for the 1964 Fair.

Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through November 02, 2014 - New York

Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness, a major survey of one of the most influential artists working in the photographic medium, confirms Christopher Williams's (American, b. 1956) status as one of the most thoughtful and thought-provoking artists of his generation, one whose interests in his generational elders is mirrored by the impact he is currently having on younger artists. In a career spanning nearly 30 years, Williams has explored the realms of photojournalism, picture archives, mass media, and commercial imaging, producing a concise oeuvre of photographs that carries an outsized impact on artists and cultural historians today. Deeply invested in the history of photography as a medium of art and intellectual inquiry, he is committed to furthering a critique of late capitalist society, in which images typically function as agents of consumer spectacle. Williams is currently professor of photography at the Kunstakademie Dusseldorf, a position previously held by Thomas Ruff, Jeff Wall (fleetingly), and -- for 20 illustrious years -- Bernd Becher.

The Roof Garden Commission: Dan Graham with Gunther Vogt - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through November 02, 2014 - New York

American artist Dan Graham (born 1942, Urbana, Illinois) will create a site-specific installation atop The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden-the second in a new series of commissions for the outdoor site. The installation will comprise one of Graham's unique steel and glass pavilions structures for which he has been renowned since the early 1980s-set within a specially engineered landscape designed in collaboration with Swiss landscape architect Gunther Vogt (born 1957, Balzers, Liechtenstein.) Constructed of hedge rows and curves of two-way mirrored glass, the pavilion will be both transparent and reflective, creating a changing and visually complex environment for visitors.

Early American Guitars: The Instruments of C. F. Martin - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through December 07, 2014 - New York

Christian Frederick Martin, founder of the great American guitar firm C. F. Martin & Co., was the son of a cabinetmaker in Markneukirchen, Saxony. Martin learned to build instruments from the famed Johann Georg Stauffer in Vienna. Due to the restrictive guilds in Markneukirchen, Martin moved to the United States in 1833, settling first in New York City and later moving to Nazareth, Pennsylvania. In the United States, Martin encountered the Spanish-style guitar and incorporated elements from that tradition into his own Viennese style of instrument construction. The result was a new form of the guitar, a style that would become important as a basis for other American makers of the instrument. This exhibition includes approximately thirty-five instruments from the Martin Museum in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and several private collections.

The Eve of Porn: Linda Lovelace - Museum of Sex
Through December 09, 2014 - New York

In 1972, Deep Throat, the tale of a woman whose clitoris was located in the back of her throat, became a trailblazer of the pornographic genre. Performing acts of graphic sex on camera, including the signature act of "deep throating," Linda Lovelace, born Linda Boreman, became a household name. Considered "Porn Chic," screenings of Deep Throat were attended by celebrities from Jackie O to Jack Nicholson. Linda became both the girl everyone wanted to attend their party and the girl that everyone wanted to have sex with, a star studded list including Hugh Hefner, Ted Kennedy and Paul Newman.

Working Below Decks - Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum
Through December 31, 2014 - New York

Operating the aircraft carrier Intrepid required the skills of 3,000 men, many of whom worked below decks -- far from the excitement of the Flight Deck. In this pop-up exhibit, the Intrepid Museum will highlight a few of these occupations through original ship's equipment that has never before been on public display. Among the equipment to be showcased is a vintage laundry press, illustrating the demanding task of keeping the crew looking clean and pressed to Navy standards. These authentic pieces of equipment reveal the behind-the-scenes occupations that were essential to the operation of Intrepid.

Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt - Brooklyn Museum
Through December 31, 2014 - Brooklyn

An exhibition exploring the roles of cats, lions, and other feline creatures in Egyptian mythology, kingship, and everyday life. From domesticated cats to mythic symbols of divinities, felines played an important role in ancient Egypt imagery for thousands of years. Now, nearly thirty diverse representations of felines from the world-famous Egyptian holdings of the Brooklyn Museum will be on view.

Gilded New York - Museum of the City of New York
Through January 04, 2015 - New York

Inaugurating the Museum's Tiffany & Co. Foundation Gallery, Gilded New York explores the city's visual culture at the end of the 19th century, when its elite class flaunted their money as never before. In New York, this era was marked by the sudden rise of industrial and corporate wealth, amassed by such titans as Cornelius Vanderbilt and Jay Gould, who expressed their high status through extravagant fashions, architecture, and interior design. The exhibition presents a lavish display of some 100 works, including costumes, jewelry, portraits, and decorative objects, all created between the mid-1870s and the early 20th century. The dazzling works in the exhibition will illuminate an era when members of the new American aristocracy often displayed their wealth in storied balls in Fifth Avenue mansions and hotels. It was a time when New York became the nation's corporate headquarters and a popular Ladies' Mile of luxury retail establishments and cultural institutions helped launch the city to global prominence.

Picturing Science: Museum Scientists and Imaging Technologies - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 04, 2015 - New York

More than 20 sets of large-format images showcase the wide range of research being conducted at the Museum as well as how various optical tools are used in scientific studies.

Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 04, 2015 - Upper West Side

Discover a world where pterosaurs soared overhead in this exciting new exhibition. A diverse group with more than 150 known species ranging from the size of a sparrow to that of a fighter jet, pterosaurs appeared 220 million years ago and survived for more than 150 million years before becoming extinct. What sets them apart from their dinosaur contemporaries is their adaptation for flying, a unique trait visitors will explore through multiple interactive exhibits. Visitors can also investigate pterosaur models, casts, and fossils and find out how these extraordinary ancient vertebrates moved on land and in the air, how they hunted, and what scientists are discovering about them today. Visitors will also glimpse the pterosaurs' ancient world in a dramatic diorama re-creating an inland sea in Brazil where pterosaurs, fishes, crocodiles, and other species co-existed millions of years ago.

Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 05, 2015 - New York

Discover a world where pterosaurs soared overhead in this exciting new exhibition. A diverse group with more than 150 known species ranging from the size of a sparrow to that of a fighter jet, pterosaurs appeared 220 million years ago and survived for more than 150 million years before becoming extinct. What sets them apart from their dinosaur contemporaries is their adaptation for flying, a unique trait visitors will explore through multiple interactive exhibits. Visitors can also investigate pterosaur models, casts, and fossils and find out how these extraordinary ancient vertebrates moved on land and in the air, how they hunted, and what scientists are discovering about them today. Visitors will also glimpse the pterosaurs' ancient world in a dramatic diorama re-creating an inland sea in Brazil where pterosaurs, fishes, crocodiles, and other species co-existed millions of years ago.

Beyond the Supersquare - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through January 11, 2015 - Bronx

Beyond the Supersquare brings together a select group of contemporary artists whose insightful work addresses the remnants of the Modern Movement in Latin America and the Caribbean. While the exhibition will address how Modernism defined a number of decisive aspects related to contemporary architecture, urbanism, and art in Latin America, this exhibition will also examine the larger political and social underpinnings of these cultural and environmental developments. Through drawings, photography, sculpture, installation, and video, Beyond the Supersquare presents a series of responses to the aggressive rise of Latin America's urban centers and the ways in which they have evolved since the mid-twentieth century.

Rethinking the Garden Casita - Bronx Museum of The Arts
Through January 11, 2015 - Bronx

From Puerto Rico to the South Bronx, the casita, or "little house" in Spanish, is the social centerpiece and focal point of many community gardens. New York Restoration Project (NYRP), in partnership with the Urban Air Foundation, enlisted TEN Arquitectos and engineers at Buro Happold to rethink the traditional casita as a modular kit of parts. NYRP staff will work with members of the Willis Avenue Community Garden in Mott Haven, Bronx, to assemble the pilot structure in their garden in Spring 2014.

A Certain Slant of Light: Spencer Finch - Morgan Library & Museum
Through January 11, 2015 - New York

American artist Spencer Finch (b. 1962) unveils a new, site-specific, large-scale installation inspired by the Morgan's great collection of medieval Books of Hours - beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan's four-story, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court, Finch will apply films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the Court to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun.

Times Square, 1984: The Postmodern Moment - Skyscraper Museum
Through January 18, 2015 - New York City

Are you too young to remember New York thirty years ago? Then time travel to experience Times Square in the 1980s at The Skyscraper Museum's new exhibition. Or perhaps are you of an age that remembers 42nd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues when even Rolling Stone Magazine called it "the sleaziest block in America"? Then revisit your youth and the wonderful world of urban design and architectural discourse c. 1984!

Chuck Jones Matinees - Museum of the Moving Image
Through January 19, 2015 - Astoria

To accompany the new exhibition What's Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, the Museum will present matinees of films directed by Jones, many presented in archival prints from The Academy Film Archive and the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity.

The Works: Salon Style at the New-York Historical Society - New-York Historical Society
Through February 08, 2015 - New York

Salon Style is a method of hanging a gallery that emphasizes the complexity and richness of a collection, often done in the collections of the European royal courts to connote taste and opulence. By the nineteenth century Salon Style was used by private art clubs to squeeze as many works into a gallery as possible. This installation displays numerous gems from the New-York Historical Society's permanent collection in nineteenth-century Salon Style, showcasing the depth and range of our holdings. Everything from self-portraits of Asher Durand to Hudson River School landscapes to religious and history paintings will be on view, in close proximity that unites these typically separate styles.

A Collection of Ideas - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 28, 2015 - New York

Museums are defined by their collections, each with a unique point of view that is carefully shaped by curators, who remain mindful of historical precedents as they look ahead to future developments. At the time of The Museum of Modern Art's founding, in 1929, the terms "modern" and "contemporary" coincided effortlessly. Since then, MoMA curators have sought to distill a timeless ideal of visual presence and meaning from different circumstances, all the while revising and reconsidering the initial paradigms of modern art. In the Department of Architecture and Design, the result of this collective, at times subjective, effort is not just a catalog of objects, but is rather a collection of ideas supported by objects. Several of the ideas and themes developed in the past are still actively discussed, but contemporary curators also regularly identify new concepts worth exploring and representing in the collection. This installation focuses on works designed during the last few decades that have been acquired by the Museum not only because they met aesthetic and functional standards that are worthy of our collection, but also because they introduce new categories of investigation and new design forms. The galleries feature clusters of acquisitions that tackle, for instance, the relationship between design and violence; new expressions of organic design in response to environmental and societal disruptions; and the increasing importance of interaction design, as seen in 13 video games new to the collection.

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through March 01, 2015 - New York

This exhibition, drawn almost exclusively from MoMA's stellar collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera, and illustrated books, is the first MoMA exhibition in 30 years dedicated solely to Lautrec, and features over 100 examples of the best-known works created during the apex of his career.

Masterworks: Jewels of the Collection - Rubin Museum of Art
Through March 11, 2015 - New York

A showcase of some of the finest works of art from the museum's collection while highlighting the stylistic diversity and relationships between different strands of Himalayan and neighboring cultural and artistic traditions.

Enlightenment and Beauty: Sculptures by Houdon and Clodion - Frick Collection
Through April 05, 2015 - New York

Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741-1828) and Claude Michel, called Clodion (1738-1814), were two of the foremost sculptors in France during the late eighteenth century, and the Frick houses an important group of their works. In 1915 founder Henry Clay Frick acquired Clodion's terracotta Zephyrus and Flora and, the following year, Houdon's marble bust of the Comtesse du Cayla. Other works that were subsequently added to the collection will be shown together for the first time, highlighting the artists' expressive ranges, as well as their defining contributions to the sculpture of Enlightenment-era France.

Kandinsky Before Abstraction, 1901-1911 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through May 01, 2015 - New York

Early in his career Vasily Kandinsky experimented with printmaking, produced brightly-colored landscapes of the German countryside, and explored recognizable and recurrent motifs. This intimate exhibition drawn from the Guggenheim collection explores his representational origins.

Revolution! Works from the Black Arts Movement - Brooklyn Museum
Through May 03, 2015 - Brooklyn

During the late sixties and seventies, the Black Arts Movement sprung up in the U.S. as the cultural expression of Black Power politics. Its leadership, which included poets, playwrights, musicians, and fine artists, rejected the dominance of the largely white mainstream art establishments that undervalued their work as black artists and created a radical alternative artistic movement based on social and political ideologies rather than narrow aesthetic dictates. In 2012, the Brooklyn Museum acquired forty-four works of art from the Black Arts Movement. Revolution! Works from the Black Arts Movement displays seven of these works from seven different artists. The strong and vibrant images on exhibit are a testament to the stylistic scope of the Black Arts Movement.

A Town Known as Auschwitz: The Life and Death of a Jewish Community - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through May 16, 2015 - New York

Discover the rich history of Oswiecim, Poland - the town the Germans called Auschwitz - through photographs that trace the life of the town and its Jewish residents, from the 16th century through the post-war period.

Bompas & Parr's FUNLAND: Pleasures & Perils of the Erotic Fairground - Museum of Sex
Through June 24, 2015 - New York

This immersive work features five "attractions" designed to stimulate all the senses in some subtle and not-so-subtle ways. Physical, visual and olfactory experiences will be utilized to give the audience a breathless rush of endorphins, challenge their strength and agility, and allow them to compete with and impress friends, lovers, and other patrons.

Gateway to Himalayan Art - The Rubin Museum
Through January 06, 2016 - New York

Marking the first in a series of yearly rotations, nearly twenty works of art add new dimensions and context to Gateway to Himalayan Art. Visitors will notice a greater emphasis on Hindu works, with beautiful examples from India and Nepal ranging from 12th to 19th centuries, as well as intricately-detailed thangka paintings, manuscript pages, and textiles. In every iteration, Gateway acquaints new and long-time friends of the museum with the principal concepts of Himalayan art, including important deities and symbols, the materials and techniques used in creating works of art, and the purposes and functions of these works in their sacred and secular contexts. And don't forget to pick up your Gateway Looking Guide to help you identify important figures and symbols throughout the museum. It's yours to keep.

Circle of Dance - National Museum of the American Indian
Through October 08, 2017 - New York

A five-year exhibition that presents Native dance as a vibrant, meaningful, and diverse form of cultural expression. Featuring ten social and ceremonial dances from throughout the Americas, the exhibition illuminates the significance of each dance and highlights the unique characteristics of its movements and music.

Dark Universe - A New Hayden Planetarium Space Show - American Museum of Natural History
Through December 31, 2018 - New York City

Dark Universe will celebrate the scientific breakthroughs that have paved the way for our increased understanding of the universe, revealing that it is dominated by two mysterious phenomena: dark matter and dark energy. To bring this story to the Hayden Planetarium dome, the Space Show uses stunning visualizations based on authentic data from NASA and European Space Agency missions, ground-based telescopes, supercomputer simulations, and research conducted at institutions around the globe, including the Museum. In Dark Universe, viewers will see the night sky at the historic Mount Wilson Observatory, soar across the Milky Way Galaxy, and parachute through Jupiter’s atmosphere. Dark Universe was created by the American Museum of Natural History, the Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space, and the Hayden Planetarium.

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