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Things to do this week in NYC Sep 29-Oct 6: Museums

September 29, 2012 - by CG Directory Editor

Some of the world's most impressive museums and exhibits are in New York?including the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and (of course) the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the great things to do in NYC is to visit these spectacular collections. Whether you're a native New Yorker or here on vacation, NYC's museums have something new and interesting to offer everybody! Here is a list of what's going on this week at museums throughout New York City.

Electric Currents, 1900-1940 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through September 30, 2012 - Midtown

Electricity -- a source of clean, efficient power and brilliant, reliable light -- epitomized the very spirit of modernism in the early 20th century. After decades of research and competitive experimentation following the development of the first arc lamps and incandescent filament bulbs in the mid-19th century, electricity began to transform every aspect of modern life. Electric light -- first in city streets and then in homes -- brought a revolutionary innovation to daily existence, literally redefining day and night. This installation features a dozen posters from MoMA's collection used in this period to promote electricity, which offered staggering possibilities for progress but was not universally welcomed. In creating graphics for industry leaders like AEG and Bosch, modern designers were inspired by the beauty of the bulb itself and the splendor of electric light, which are both rendered with exquisite power in Jacques Nathan-Garamond's poster of c. 1938, which pulsates in 2-D. The installation highlights a selection of Lester Beall's equally vibrant posters for the Rural Electrification Administration, which used bold, patriotic graphics to foster public awareness of the benefits of electricity in America's homes and farms during the Great Depression.

The Rylands Haggadah Medieval Jewish Art in Context - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 30, 2012 -

From the calling of Moses to the crossing of the Red Sea, the drama of the ancient Israelites' exodus from Egypt is presented in The Rylands Haggadah. This is the third in a series of installations focusing on one masterwork of Hebrew manuscript illumination from a national or international collection. This spring, the featured work comes from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester, England. Each month, the Haggadah will be open to a different page, affording visitors the exceptional opportunity to follow the artist's telling of the Exodus story. Works of art from the Museum's own collection, made for Christian use but depicting the saga of the Hebrew people, will suggest the larger, medieval context of biblical storytelling in which the Haggadah was created. The previous installations featured the Washington Haggadah (on view April 5-July 4, 2011) and Lisbon's Hebrew Bible (on view November 22, 2011-January 16, 2012).

Paintings on Parchment - Italian Renaissance Illuminations from the Robert Lehman Collection - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through September 30, 2012 -

This installation of Italian illuminations from the Robert Lehman Collection, featuring examples by leading masters from the early fourteenth to the early sixteenth century, highlights the achievements of this art form and its close ties to painting during the Italian Renaissance. The majority of the parchment leaves and cuttings, decorated in jewel-toned palettes and gold, are initials that have been excised from choir books. Approaching the scale of small panel paintings, the Florentine and Sienese initials reflect the colossal size of these books, which enabled a large group of clergy to read the text and music at a distance. Two Northern Italian leaves, not created as part of manuscripts but as independent paintings on parchment, also blur the boundaries between the two art forms. In fact, nearly all of the illuminators represented worked in both media; paintings by three of them (Lorenzo Monaco, Sano di Pietro, and the Osservanza Master) are displayed nearby in the Lehman galleries, highlighting Robert Lehman's view of his miniatures as an extension of his paintings collection.

Pictures from the Moon: Artists' Holograms 1969-2008 - New Museum
Through September 30, 2012 - New York

In conjunction with the Museum-wide summer exhibition "Ghosts in the Machine," the New Museum will present "Pictures from the Moon" in the Lobby Gallery, which will feature a focused selection of holograms from the 1960s to the present by several leading, contemporary artists. The 1960s ushered in new technologies and new frontiers for image production. The development of laser technology in 1962 enabled the creation of holograms that displayed three-dimensional images on a two-dimensional surface. Artists were drawn to holography, hailed as a medium of the future that turned space inside out, for its spatial, volumetric, and sequential qualities, and to the creative possibilities it offered in contrast to photography, film, and early video. "Pictures from the Moon"-its title inspired by photographs of earth taken by astronauts on the first mission to the moon that also expanded our way of seeing-celebrates an alternative history of virtually unknown images by artists experimenting on the edge of visual technology. One of the earliest pioneers in the holographic medium is Bruce Nauman, whose holograms from the late 1960s furthered the physical manipulations and explorations of the body as a medium that he was conducting at the time. Nauman produced two sets of holograms between 1968 and 1969. The second set displays his body compressed, coerced, and contorted into the picture plane. "Pictures from the Moon" will include Nauman's Hologram H from the "Second Hologram Series: Full Figure Poses (A-J)" (1969), marking one of the first times this work has been shown in New York. A surprising number of established artists soon followed with experimentations in holography that have continued over the last four decades. Artists as diverse as Louise Bourgeois, Eric Orr, Ed Ruscha, and James Turrell have all made holographic works that draw on the medium's ability to replicate three-dimensionality and deep space to expand upon themes they so successfully mined in other formats. The haunting, domestic objects and sinister interiors that define Bourgeois's work appear wholly present in her untitled holograms from 1998. In Ed Ruscha's series of holograms produced the same year, the phrase "The End" floats at various depths in the picture plane, set against animated lines scratched into a celluloid surface, and offering a new twist on the interplay between text, landscape, and spatial representation for which Ruscha is known. Eric Orr and James Turrell, in whose works light and space function as artistic mediums, both created holograms that synthesize color, shape, illumination, and form. Turrell, who has made an extensive body of holographic work and who continues to work in the medium pushing it forward into challenging new realms, produced the largest and most recent hologram in the exhibition. In this current age of techno-dependency, "Pictures from the Moon" offers a view of the persistent attempts by artists to wrest something more from technology than that for which it was invented. As advancements in 3-D technologies are demonstrated in new formats of television and film production, the enduring hologram continues to mesmerize by expanding the artistic and visual fields that lay before our eyes.

Yayoi Kusama - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through September 30, 2012 - New York

Well known for her use of dense patterns of polka dots and nets, as well as her intense, large-scale environments, Yayoi Kusama works in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance, and immersive installation. Born in Japan in 1929, Kusama came to the United States in 1957 and quickly found herself at the epicenter of the New York avant-garde. After achieving fame through groundbreaking exhibitions and art "happenings," she returned to her native country in 1973 and is now one of Japan's most prominent contemporary artists. This retrospective features works spanning Kusama's career.

Alighiero Boetti: Game Plan - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through October 01, 2012 - Midtown

This retrospective, organized in collaboration with the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid and the Tate Modern in London, will be the largest presentation outside of Italy of works by Italian artist Alighiero Boetti (1940-1994) to date. Working in his hometown of Turin in the early 1960s amidst a close community of artists that included Luciano Fabro, Mario Merz, Giulio Paolini, and Michelangelo Pistoletto, among others, Boetti established himself as one of the leading artists of the Arte Povera movement. Organized chronologically, the exhibition will span Boetti's entire career beginning with his sculptural works, or objects as he preferred to call them, comprised of everyday materials including wood, cardboard, and aluminum. Brought together (many for the first time since Boetti's seminal exhibition at Galleria Christian Stein in Turin in 1967) and installed in a dense configuration inspired by the original clustered presentation, these early works convey the material experiments of the period as well as notions of measurement and chance that Boetti would play with and revise throughout his career. While Boetti is often chiefly affiliated with the Arte Povera moment, Alighiero Boetti: Game Plan will consider Boetti beyond these brief years. In 1969 Boetti began exploring notions of duality and multiplicity, order and disorder, travel and geography, and he initiated postal and map works imagining distant places. For the work Viaggi Postali, begun the summer of 1969, Boetti sent envelopes to friends, family, and fellow artists but used imaginary addresses, forwarding each returned envelope to yet another non-existent place. Boetti thus created imaginary journeys for the people he admired. In other conceptual, mail art-related works made throughout the 1970s, Boetti would use different stamps and arrange them in permutations on the envelopes to compose his art, and send postcards picturing a monument in his hometown from places around the world. The exhibition brings together these and other works related to travel, geography, and mapping, many of which relate to his extensive travels to Afghanistan, where he operated the One Hotel (archival material from which will be on view) from 1971 until the Soviet invasion in 1979. During this period, Boetti began working with local artisans to produce embroideries such as the Mappas (maps), Arazzi (word squares), and Tuttos (literally, "Everything"), important examples of which will be included in the galleries and the Marron Atrium. An important aspect of Boetti's oeuvre is drawing, which runs as a constant throughout his work. A monumental Biro (ball point pen) drawing from 1973, spelling out the title "Mettere a mondo il mondo (Bringing the world into the world)" points to some of Boetti's ideas about art making that were fundamental to his practice: that the artist, rather than inventing, simply brings what already exists in the world into the work; and that everything in the world is potentially useful for the artist. This exhibition will celebrate the material diversity, conceptual complexity, and visual beauty of Boetti's work, bringing together his ideas about order and disorder, non-invention, and the way in which the work addresses the whole world, travel, and time, proving him to be one of the most important and influential international artists of his generation.

The Portrait in Contemporary Photography - Guggenheim Museum
October 02, 2012 - Manhattan

Carol Armstrong, Yale University, examines the place of portraiture in contemporary photography on a global stage. Looking at changing concepts of personhood against the historical background of portraiture in painting and other traditional mediums, this lecture will track the shift to the photographic portraiture in the 19th century, and the further shift in photography in the 1970s and 1980s toward large-scaled imagery and references to art history. Following the lecture, guests are invited to enjoy a reception and exhibition viewing of Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective.

Contemporary Art from the Collection - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
October 03, 2012 - Midtown

Reinstalled to continue the historical sequence found on MoMA's fifth (1880-1940) and fourth (1940-1980) floors, the galleries on the second floor will begin with art of the early 1980s and extend to the present moment, interweaving works in all mediums. Individual galleries will focus on particular topics, ranging from specific locales that nourished influential groups of artists to key strategies shared by diverse practitioners of the same generation. Others will display a single significant installation or artist's project. Like the fifth- and fourth-floor galleries, the second-floor galleries will be periodically reinstalled to reflect the depth and richness of the Museum's collection, and to allow for varying approaches to the wide variety of art produced during the last 30 years. Featured artists include Ashley Bickerton, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring, Martin Kippenberger, Steve McQueen, Senga Nengudi, Doris Salcedo, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Rosemarie Trockel.

Ghosts in the Machine - New Museum
Through October 07, 2012 - New York

Opening at the New Museum in July 2012, "Ghosts in the Machine" surveys the constantly shifting relationship between humans, machines, and art. Occupying the Museum's three main galleries, the exhibition examines artists' embrace of and fascination with technology, as well as their prescient awareness of the ways in which technology can transform subjective experiences. International in scope, the exhibition spans more than fifty years and incorporates works by contemporary artists. The works assembled trace the complex historical passage from the mechanical to the optical to the virtual, looking at the ways in which humans have projected anthropomorphic behaviors onto machines that have become progressively more human. In place of a traditional, chronological approach, "Ghosts in the Machine" is conceived as an encyclopedic cabinet of wonders: bringing together an array of artworks and non-art objects to create an unsystematic archive of man�s attempt to reconcile the organic and the mechanical. The installation at the New Museum will include artists, writers, and visionaries whose works have explored the fears and aspirations generated by the technology of their time. From Jacob Mohr's influencing machines to Emery Blagdon's healing constructions, the exhibition brings together improvised technologies charged with magical powers. Historical works by Hans Haacke, Robert Breer, Otto Piene, and Gianni Colombo, amongst others, will be displayed alongside reconstructions of lost works and realizations of dystopian mechanical devices invented by figures like Franz Kafka. "Ghosts in the Machine" also takes its cue from a number of exhibitions designed by artists that incorporated modern technology to reimagine the role of art in contemporary societies, including Richard Hamilton's "Man, Machine and Motion" (1955). Exploring the integration of art and science, "Ghosts in the Machine" also tries to identify an art historical lineage of works preoccupied with the way we imagine and experience the future, delineating an archeology of visionary dreams that have never become a reality. Many of the artists in the show take a scientific approach to investigating the realm of the invisible, dismantling the mechanics of vision in order to conceive new possibilities for seeing. Central to the exhibition is a re-examination of Op Art and perceptual abstraction, with a particular focus on the work of painters Bridget Riley, Victor Vasarely, Richard Anuskiewicz, and Julian Stanczak, amongst others. Op Art was unique in the way it internalized technology and captured both the ecstatic and threatening qualities it posed to the human body. Furthermore, the exhibition will include a number of kinetic and "programmed" artworks as well as expanded cinema pieces, which amplify the radical effects of technology on vision. A section of the exhibition will present a selection of experimental films and videos realized with early computer technology. One highlight of the installation will be a reconstruction of Stan VanDerBeek's Movie-Drome (1963-65), an immersive cinematic environment where the viewer is bathed in a constant stream of moving images, anticipating the fusion of information and the body, typical of the digital era. As technology has accelerated and proliferated dramatically over the past twenty years, artists have continued to monitor its impact. A number of contemporary artists, including Mark Leckey, Henrik Olesen, and Christopher Williams, will be represented in the exhibition. These recent works, while reflecting technological changes, also display a fascination with earlier machines and the types of knowledge and experiences that are lost as we move from one era to the next, constantly dreaming up new futures that will never arrive.

Rineke Dijkstra - A Retrospective - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through October 08, 2012 - New York

This comprehensive mid-career survey features over 70 color photographs and five video installations by the Dutch artist Rineke Dijkstra. Rineke Dijkstra is organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Filming the Camps: John Ford, Samuel Fuller, George Stevens: From Hollywood to Nuremberg - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through October 14, 2012 - New York

Hollywood directors John Ford, George Stevens, and Samuel Fuller entertained audiences with American cinema classics like The Grapes of Wrath, Shane, and The Big Red One. But their most important contribution to history was their work in the U.S. Armed Forces and Secret Services, filming the realities of war and the liberation of Nazi concentration camps. Their documentation provides an essential visual record of WWII. Filming the Camps presents rare footage of the liberation of Dachau with detailed directors' notes, narratives describing burials at Falkenau, and the documentary produced as evidence at the Nuremberg trials, among other historic material. Now, for the first time in the U.S., this material is being made available to a general audience.

Josef Albers in America: Painting on Paper - Morgan Library & Museum
Through October 14, 2012 -

Josef Albers (1888-1976) is best known for his series of paintings, Homage to the Square, in which he endlessly explored color relationships within a similar format of concentric squares. Less well-known are the studies he made for these compositions. With approximately sixty oil sketches on paper, this exhibition will reveal a private side of Albers's work. These sketches were never exhibited in the artist's lifetime and have rarely been seen after his death. On view will be early studies (1930s-early 1940s), studies for Albers's Adobe series, inspired by Mexican architecture (1940s-early 1950s), and studies for Homage to the Square (1950s-1970s). These vibrant sketches provide insights into the artist's working process and, in contrast with the austerity and strict geometry of the final paintings, are remarkable for their freedom and sensuality. Works are drawn from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut and the Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop, Germany. The exhibition, which is traveling to multiple venues in Europe before coming to the Morgan (the only U.S. venue), is organized by the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung in Munich and the Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop.

Modernist Art from India - Approaching Abstraction - The Rubin Museum
Through October 16, 2012 - New York

Approaching Abstraction is the second exhibition of a three-part series, titled Modernist Art from India, that examines art from post-independence and post-Partition India. Building on the explorations between abstraction and figuration begun in The Body Unbound, the exhibition distinguishes abstraction in modernist Indian art from abstraction in Euro-American modernism and shows the independent trajectory of abstraction in post-Independence India.

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3 - Museum of Arts & Design
Through October 21, 2012 -

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3/Contemporary Native North American Art from the Northeast and Southeast concludes a cycle of exhibitions organized over the past decade by the Museum of Arts and Design. Curated by Ellen Taubman and David McFadden, these exhibitions have presented a diverse panoply of new work by Native American, First Nations, Métís and Inuit artists from the continental United States, the Pacific rim, and Canada. Representing both established and emerging artists, the series has laid bare the new vitality and spirit of experimentation that has come to the forefront among the art practices of Native artists working today. All three Changing Hands exhibitions have focused on art that points toward the future, presenting works by contemporary artists who embrace and take inspiration from cultural traditions while also expressing contemporary creativity and innovation. They have sought to transcend ethnographic and anthropological interpretations, challenge preconceived notions and stereotypes of Indigenous art and artists, and ultimately to effect a reevaluation of present-day Native art in an international arena.

Capital of Capital - Museum of the City of New York
Through October 21, 2012 - Upper East Side

Capital of Capital: New York's Banks and the Creation of a Global Economy explores how the economic dynamo that is New York was made possible in great measure by its innovative and controversial banking sector. Tracing the trajectory of the city's banks from the founding of the Bank of New York by Alexander Hamilton in 1784 to their primacy in today's nation and world, the exhibition utilizes rare historical objects and images, including banking instruments, architectural renderings, and advertisements, to tell a fascinating saga of growth, innovation, and, at times, unintended consequences. In so doing, it also reveals how New York City's particular circumstances-geography, human capital, and political alignments-helped make finance a major component not only of Gotham's economy but also of its identity

Signs & Symbols - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through October 28, 2012 - New York

Drawn from the Museum's deep holdings of paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, and photographs, Signs & Symbols sheds new light on the development of American abstraction during the critical postwar period of the mid-1940s to the end of the 1950s. Many artists active in this period who are often overlooked -- Will Barnet, Forrest Bess, Charles Seliger, and Mark Tobey, among others -- developed abstract work that remains distinct from many of the concerns associated with the canonized Abstract Expressionists, including large-scale canvases and gestural brushwork. Instead, the exhibition presents a more nuanced narrative, focused on the figurative and calligraphic "signs and symbols" present in much of the highly controlled work from this period and included in this show. In many cases, this work drew inspiration from specifically American sources and sought to foster a national aesthetic distinct from European Surrealism and Cubism. These investigations formed an important foundation for a future generation of artists--including Jasper Johns and Roy Lichtenstein--who later incorporated highly individualized systems of signs into their own work while embracing distinctly American subject matter.

Oskar Fischinger: Space Light Art - A Film Environment - Whitney Museum of American Art
Through October 28, 2012 - New York

This exhibition presents one of the first multimedia projections ever made: Oskar Fischinger's Raumlichtkunst (Space Light Art), a re-creation of his multiple-screen film events, first shown in Germany in 1926, and recently restored by the Center for Visual Music in Los Angeles. Radical in format, its display of abstract shapes and colors produces, according to Fischinger, "an intoxication by light from a thousand sources."

The Harlem Edge Cultivating Connections - Center for Architecture
Through October 31, 2012 -

The Emerging New York Architects (ENYA) Committee of the AIA NY Chapter is proud to announce the winners of its fifth biennial design ideas competition, The Harlem Edge | Cultivating Connections. One hundred seventy-eight (178) teams and individuals registered for the competition and more than ninety-eight (98) entries from sixteen (16) countries were submitted for judging. The winning entries will be exhibited at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place, New York, NY, this July and be published in a competition catalog. In coordination with the exhibition, ENYA will be hosting a symposium to discuss design issues related to the winning entries and possibilities for the future development of the site and its neighboring community. Congratulations to the winners: ENYA Prize, $5000: Sym'bio'pia Ting Chin and Yan Wang, Linearscape Architecture, New York, NY, USA 2nd Prize, $2500: The Hudson Exchange Eliza Higgins, Cyrus Patell, Chris Starkey, and Andrea Vittadini, Brooklyn, NY, USA 3rd Prize, $1000: Harlem Harvest Ryan Doyle, Guido Elgueta, and Tyler Caine, Brooklyn, NY, USA Student Prize, $1000: Stairway to Harlem Daniel Mowery, Student of Architecture, University of Virginia, USA Honorable Mentions: Continuum, by Nasiq Khan, and Scott Brandi, Bayside, NY, USA Subaqueous Promenade, by Doyoung Oh, and Jaemin Ha, London, United Kingdom/Boston, MA, USA New Marine Transfer Station, by Yashar Ghasemkhani, Arash Mesbah, and Pooneh Sadrimanesh, New York, NY, USA Land Over Water Agro-Pavilion, by Michael C. Kilroy, and Jonathan Sampson, Students of Architecture, University of New Mexico, USA Greenhouse Transformer, by Dongwoo Yim, and Rafael Luna, PRAUD, Boston, MA, USA

Tomas Saraceno on the Roof: Cloud City - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through November 04, 2012 -

Artist Tomas Saraceno (born in Tucuman, Argentina, in 1973) will create a constellation of large, interconnected modules constructed with transparent and reflective materials for the Museum's Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. Visitors may enter and walk through these habitat-like, modular structures grouped in a nonlinear configuration. Over the past decade, Saraceno has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivity that merge art, architecture, and science. The interdisciplinary project "Cloud Cities/Air Port City" is rooted in the artist's investigation of expanding the ways in which we inhabit and experience our environment.

A Stately Presence: The NYPD's Mounted Unit - New York City Police Museum
Through November 04, 2012 - Manhattan

New York City police have used horse-mounted officers since at least 1858, with the opening of Central Park. Since its formal organization in 1871, the Mounted Unit has evolved into one of the NYPD's most visible and elite police units. This exciting exhibit will explore their fascinating history and continuing day-to-day operations. Through artifacts that include saddles, harnesses and uniforms, paintings, video, and historic photographs, the exhibit will delve into the lives and work of the officers known by their nickname, "10-foot cops."

Robert Wilson/Philip Glass: Einstein on the Beach - Morgan Library & Museum
Through November 04, 2012 -

Reuniting the score and designs from Philip Glass and Robert Wilson's Einstein on the Beach, this exhibition focuses on the opera's premiere performances in 1976. Visitors will enter a gallery awash in blue light, reminiscent of the opera's stage lighting, where they will encounter Glass's entire never-before-displayed autograph manuscript, as well as Wilson's storyboard, thirteen leaves encompassing 113 scene designs. Footage from the New York rehearsal, and 1976 productions in Paris, Brussels, and Venice will run continuously in the gallery; the documentary "Einstein on the Beach: The Changing Image of Opera," about the 1984 production at BAM, will be screened in the Morgan's Gilder Lehrman Hall throughout the exhibition.

Universe of Desire - Museum of Sex
Through November 04, 2012 - New York

Type. Swipe. Search. Upload. Download. Post. Stream. These are the new verbs of desire. Our most intimate thoughts, fantasies, and urges are now transmitted via electronic devices to rapt audiences all over the world. These transmissions-from sexts to webcam masturbation feeds-are anonymous yet personal, individual yet collective, everywhere and nowhere, and they are contributing to the largest sexual record to date. In short, desire has gone viral. But what does this mean? And what does it reveal about us? This exhibition explores these very questions through a lens of digital experience by examining what we are searching for, how we do it and what we leave behind on these electronic devices. In piecing this together, we begin to expose staggering truths about who we are and how we interact in this ever-changing world of modern sexuality. "As human behavior becomes more clickable than physical, we can-t help but wonder what this means for our most basic, biological impulse: sex." says Mark Snyder, Director of Exhibitions and Co-Curator of "Universe of Desire." The exhibition explores this very question by examining what we actually search for on the internet and what we leave behind. Neuroscientists Ogi Ogas and Sai Gaddam, authors of the best-selling book, A Billion Wicked Thoughts, provide much of the inspiration for "Universe of Desire." Ogas and Gaddam gathered and coded 400 million internet searches, 55 million of which (or roughly 13 percent) proved to be searches for some kind of erotic content. The findings mined from analyzing the internet habits of tens of millions of people worldwide will be on display in "Universe of Desire." These anonymous searches bring to question our identity by revealing both the expected "kinks" and "squicks" (squirm-inducing kinks), as well as the broad categories of shared desire that account for 80 percent of internet searches, including "cheating partners", "youth", "mature" and various genitalia. Confronted with this research we begin to see just how similar and different we all are as humans. Supporting this content is a variety of media that amplifies and humanizes the scientific findings of A Billion Wicked Thoughts. Showcasing artifacts from Science, Culture, Art and Technology, Universe of Desire explores the virtual cataloging of our sexual wants, infatuations and yearnings by walking patrons through the kind of sex we, as humans, look up on the internet. Photographer Natacha Merritt, author of Digital Diaries, has documented herself digitally for the last 14 years. As one of the first photographers to capture erotic imagery in a digital medium, a selection of this pioneering artist's work is exhibited for the first time in its chronology, offering a visual timeline as example of photographic evolution, serving both as record and expression of our sexual desires through the last decade. Further exploring the relationship between digital imagery and sexual fantasy, visitors to "Universe of Desire" are invited to engage with a series of video and interactive experiences. Highlights include a digital mirror created by Kevin Bleich and Gabriela Guti?rrez which literally deconstructs patrons into pixels, and projects avatars of their "digital selves" onto the walls of the gallery, while an interactive video collage from Johnny Woods lures visitors into a virtual romp of sexual artifacts designed to stimulate, provoke and delight audiences.

Beauties of the Gilded Age: Peter Marie's Miniatures of Society Women - New-York Historical Society
Through November 11, 2012 - New York

Between 1889 and 1903, New York socialite Peter Marie (1825-1903) commissioned portrait miniatures of women whom he believed epitomized female beauty. His collection of nearly 300 watercolor-on-ivory miniatures stands today as a vivid document of New York�s Gilded Age aristocracy. Beauties of the Gilded Age presents likenesses of many prominent women of the era, including legendary socialite Edith Minturn, athlete Edith Hope Goddard, and social activist Emeline Winthrop. The fragile and rarely exhibited portraits will be displayed in four-month rotations in a special new gallery designed for intimate viewing.

Drawings and Prints - Selections from the Permanent Collection - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through November 18, 2012 -

This exhibition includes a selection of early and mid-sixteenth century drawings and prints by Renaissance artists for whom ancient sculpture remained a perpetual source of inspiration. The selection reveals some of the ways in which draftsmen and printmakers from different parts of Europe responded to the common heritage of classical antiquity. Also on display is an exceptional group of prints after designs by Frans Floris de Vriendt (1519/20-1570), the foremost Netherlandish artist of the mid-sixteenth century. They showcase Floris's innovative treatment of mythology and history.

Checks & Balances - Presidents and American Finance - Museum of American Finance
Through November 30, 2012 - New York

The US federal government was born of a fiscal crisis produced by the inability of the national and state governments to repay the heavy debts incurred winning independence from England. By luck, pluck and a sprinkling of genius, the new nation averted disaster and soon became one of the most creditworthy in history, able to fund global wars, massive territorial acquisitions and scientific and engineering feats of historic importance and unprecedented scale. Today, however, serious fiscal crisis looms again. The causes and consequences of the current economic crisis are hotly debated, but almost everyone agrees there is no easy fix at hand. Simply put, it has become too difficult to increase taxes or reduce expenditures, and solutions acceptable to both major political parties are in short supply. But the government has faced similar impasses in the past and has managed, with firm leadership, to persevere. This exhibit brings attention to the budget issues that faced five of our greatest Presidents: George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt. It details how they handled those issues, sometimes with spectacular success and other times with controversial or mixed results. The exhibit also shows how each President's life experiences, including personal wealth, may have influenced decisions on important issues like the rate and type of taxation and the acceptable extent of government borrowing. In and of itself, knowledge of the past cannot improve the future, but retracing past glories and disappointments is often the best place to start.

Spiders Alive! - American Museum of Natural History
Through December 02, 2012 - Upper West Side

For centuries, spiders have inspired storytellers, from Ovid to E. B. White to the creators of the eponymous superhero, but their actual role in diverse ecosystems around the globe is just as captivating. Spiders Alive! immerses visitors in the fascinating and complex world of spiders, among the most versatile animals on the planet: they inhabit every continent but Antarctica and are able to survive in environments that range from deserts to rainforests to crowded cities. Spiders are also important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds of insects a year. Scientists have identified over 42,000 species of spiders to date, and there are at least as many more to be discovered. Among the live spiders visitors will encounter in this exhibition are the goliath bird eater, one of the largest spiders in the world, whose prey includes snakes, mice, and frogs; the venomous western black widow, one of the few North American spiders harmful to people; and species from other arachnid orders, including African whip spiders, whose whip-like feelers, up to 10 inches in length, help the animal find its way. Spiders Alive! will explore spiders' silk, venom, and little-known defensive mechanisms such as mimicry and noise making. The exhibition will also include larger-than-life models, videos, interactive exhibits, and fossils, and Museum staff will be handling live arachnids for visitors to see up close. Gallery 77, first floor

Kandinsky 1911-1913 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through December 27, 2012 - New York

Perhaps more than any other 20th-century painter, Vasily Kandinsky (b. 1866, Moscow; d. 1944, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) has been closely linked to the history of the Guggenheim Museum. Hilla Rebay?artist, art advisor, and the museum's first director?promoted nonobjective painting above all other forms of abstraction. She was particularly inspired by the work and writing of Kandinsky, a pioneer of abstraction, who believed that the task of the painter was to convey his own inner world, rather than imitate the natural world. The museum's holdings have grown to include more than 150 works by Kandinsky, and focused exhibitions of his works are presented in the Kandinsky Gallery on Annex Level 3. The current installation, Kandinsky 1911?1913, highlights paintings completed at the moment the artist made great strides toward complete abstraction and published his aesthetic treatise, On the Spiritual in Art (1911, though dated 1912). Also featured are paintings by Robert Delaunay and Franz Marc that were exhibited alongside the work of Kandinsky and others in the landmark 1912 Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) exhibition held at the Moderne Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser in Munich.

Masterworks - The Rubin Museum
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

Masterworks: Jewels of the Collection displays some of the museum's most stunning works of art. The stylistic diversity and relationships between various strands of Himalayan and neighboring cultural and artistic traditions are represented by important works of art spanning a period of over one thousand years. In addition to a wide range of Buddhist and Hindu deities rendered in all major media, Masterworks also highlights the museum's most notable recent acquisitions, all of which have rarely or never been exhibited. Life-size facsimiles of an entire sequence of murals from the Lukhang, the Dalai Lamas' Secret Temple near the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet, provide an exceptional opportunity for viewing Himalayan art at its most lavish. The original eighteenth-century wall paintings--inaccessible to the public until the late twentieth century--uniquely depict the most esoteric of meditation and yoga practices in vivid color and detail. Created with new photographic methods by Thomas Laird and Clint Clemens, this display of large-format, high resolution pigment prints allows for even better access to the paintings than is possible in the temple itself. Their presentation at the Rubin marks the first showing in the world of prints created using this technology and also provides the first-ever opportunity outside Tibet to view full-size Tibetan murals in their relationship to portable art from the region.

Emma Lazarus: Poet of Exiles - Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

A new exhibition held in conjunction with the 125th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty. Known for more than a century as the author of the lines "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free...," the poet Emma Lazarus gave voice to the Statue of Liberty and generations of newcomers to America. However, few people know her fascinating story, her Sephardic background, her American roots, and her work for Jewish causes and a Jewish homeland. Learn how Emma Lazarus' journey inspired her to craft an enduring message on exile, refuge, and the promise of America.

Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through December 31, 2012 - New York

For decades, critics have observed that Andy Warhol exerted an enormous impact on contemporary art, but no exhibition has yet explored the full nature or extent of that influence. Through approximately forty-five works by Warhol alongside one hundred works by some sixty other artists, Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years juxtaposes prime examples of Warhol's paintings, sculpture, and films with those by other artists who in key ways reinterpret, respond, or react to his groundbreaking work. What emerges is a fascinating dialogue between works of art and artists across generations.

Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through December 31, 2012 -

For decades, critics have observed that Andy Warhol exerted an enormous impact on contemporary art, but no exhibition has yet explored the full nature or extent of that influence. Through approximately forty-five works by Warhol alongside one hundred works by some sixty other artists, Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years juxtaposes prime examples of Warhol's paintings, sculpture, and films with those by other artists who in key ways reinterpret, respond, or react to his groundbreaking work. What emerges is a fascinating dialogue between works of art and artists across generations.

Creatures of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence - American Museum of Natural History
Through January 06, 2013 - Upper West Side

The perpetually dark deep ocean comprises the vast majority of the planet's habitable environments where approximately 90 percent of the organisms are bioluminescent and provide the only source of light. Many of these environments are threatened habitats where organisms are in danger of disappearing, some before they have been discovered and studied. Creatures of Light introduces visitors to the astonishing variety of bioluminescent creatures; explores the different ways in which organisms glow, as well as explains the physics and chemistry of natural light; reveals how the ability to glow can be advantageous; and considers how scientists study -- and use -- bioluminescence. Visitors enter the exhibition through a forest of bioluminescent mushrooms surrounding a large-scale mushroom at the center. One section evokes a New England meadow on a summer night and highlights how fireflies use patterns of flashing light to communicate and attract mates; another invites visitors to peer into Waitomo Cave of New Zealand and learn how glowworms attract prey. The exhibition includes live flashlight fish that harbor bioluminescent bacteria. Creatures of Light also features an interactive environment that introduces visitors to the brilliant light displays of Mosquito Bay in Vieques, Puerto Rico, where high concentrations of microscopic dinoflagellates, a type of plankton, create a glowing, luminescent halo around anything that moves through the bay; and a large interactive image of the Bloody Bay coral wall in the Cayman Islands. A "deep sea theater" reveals the amazing diversity of living light that marine biologists have captured on camera including anglerfishes waving bioluminescent "lures" to attract prey and jellyfishes that light up like a flashing pinwheel when threatened.

Colors of the Universe - Chinese Hardstone Carving - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 -

Stone carving is one of the oldest arts in China, its beginnings dating back to remote antiquity. Although jade, the mineral nephrite, was held in the highest esteem, all stones that could achieve a luster after polishing, be it agate, turquoise, malachite, chalcedony, quartz, jasper, or lapis lazuli, were also appreciated. Stone carving experienced an efflorescence during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911), when an abundant supply of raw materials, exceptionally accomplished craftsmen, and, in particular, keen imperial patronage contributed to the creation of numerous superb works.

Ada Bobonis: Stages, Mountains, Water - Queens Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 - Queens

Ada Bobonis' site-specific installation entitled Stages, Mountains, Water transforms the Museum's second floor gallery space into an invigorating chromatic environment evoking the Caribbean landscape. Geometric compositions in hues of blue and green are either painted on the wall or adhered to the glass railing facade in the form of translucent color film. Alluding to horizons and vistas, expansive bodies of land and water, the work takes its inspiration from the Panama Canal, one of the icons of 19th century aspirations for the New World. The construction of the Panama Canal (1880 - 1914) was a historical triumph of international ambition at the turn of the century. Upon completion, the 51-mile-long ship canal connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean by cutting across the Isthmus of Panama, and has since become a key conduit for global maritime trade. The area's topography is characterized by vast mountain vistas, the Gatun Lake, and the presence of the Panama Canal Locks (long vertical barriers of different sizes controlling the passage of over-sized ships), and is a spectacular fusion of the natural world and man's interventions upon it. Stages, Mountains, Water deftly renders the peculiar landscape of the Panama Canal in a minimal composition of color and shapes. While the color-treated glass railing facade creates an evocative aquatic effect, the "cloud of blades" overhead – clustered sculptural cutouts spanning the gallery's ceiling - symbolizes man's forceful intercession in the natural landscape that profoundly altered the location. The installation further brings the view of Flushing Meadows Corona Park and the Unisphere, a 140-foot-high steel representation of Earth built as an emblem for the 1964 World's Fair, into the gallery space itself. Separated by exactly half a century, the Panama Canal and the Unisphere - both products of the state-of-the-art engineering of their time - echo each other with the timeless human aspiration for exploration they embody, whether by taming the power of the oceans or spanning the infinite reaches of outer space.

Chinese Gardens - Pavilions, Studios, Retreats - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 06, 2013 -

In the densely populated urban centers of China, enclosed gardens have long been an integral part of residential and palace architecture, serving as extensions of living quarters. The preferred site for hosting literary gatherings, theatrical performances, and imaginary outings, gardens were often designed following the same compositional principles used in painting. And as idealized landscapes, gardens often drew inspiration from literary themes first envisioned by painters. Not only were painters often recruited to design gardens, but as gardens came to be identified with the tastes and personalities of their residents, artists were also called upon to create idealized paintings of gardens to serve as symbolic portraits intended to reflect the character of the owner. This exhibition, which encircles the Astor Chinese Garden Court, explores the pictorial imagery of gardens as an abiding source of artistic invention. Featuring more than sixty paintings, as well as ceramics, carved bamboo, lacquerware, metalwork, textiles, and several contemporary photographs from the Museum's collection, the exhibition examines the rich interactions between pictorial and garden arts in China across more than one thousand years.

Quay Brothers: On Deciphering the Pharmacist's Prescription for Lip-Reading Puppets - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 07, 2013 - Midtown

This MoMA gallery exhibition and accompanying film retrospective will be the first presentation of the Quay Brothers' work in all their fields of creative activity. Internationally renowned moving image artists and designers, the Quay Brothers were born outside Philadelphia and have worked from their London studio, Atelier Koninck, since the late 1970s. For over 30 years, they have been in the avant-garde of stop-motion puppet animation and live-action movie-making in the Eastern European tradition of filmmakers like Walerian Borowczyk and Jan Svankmajer and the Russian Yuri Norstein, and have championed a design aesthetic influenced by the graphic surrealism of Polish poster artists of the 1950s and 1960s. Beginning with their student films in 1971, the Quay Brothers have produced over 45 moving image works, including two features, music videos, dance films, documentaries, and signature personal works, including The Street of Crocodiles (1986), the Stille Nacht series (1988-2008), Institute Benjamenta (1995), and In Absentia (2000). They have also designed sets and projections for opera, drama, and concert performances such as Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa (1991), Ionesco's The Chairs (Tony-nominated design, 1997), Richard Ayre's The Cricket Recovers (2005), and recent site-specific pieces based on the work of Bart�k and Kafka. In addition to their better known films, this exhibition will include never-before-seen moving image works and graphic design, drawings, and calligraphy, presenting animated and live-action films alongside installations, objects, and works on paper.

Eyes Closed/Eyes Open: Recent Acquisitions in Drawings - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 07, 2013 - Midtown

This exhibition is culled from the past two years of acquisitions by MoMA's Department of Drawings. Anchored in various explorations of the late 1960s, these works reveal a range of creative, intellectual, and critical impulses -- whether serving as an intimate record of the artist's practice, or purposefully crafted to address an assumed wider audience. German artist Franz Erhard Walther created a suite of "work drawings" to illustrate (both functionally and conceptually) his First Work Series (1963-69), a group of 58 interactive sculptural objects, on display at the Museum for the first time since their original presentation here in 1969. While roughly contemporary, Willem de Kooning's "Eyes-Closed" drawings of 1966, which were sketched blindly by the artist, offer a counterpoint to Walther's project and seem to embrace the traditional role of drawing as a tool of private expression, while Martha Rosler's Bringing the War Home: House Beautiful photomontage series of 1967-72 turns a critical eye to the era's sociopolitical context and expanding media sphere.

Designing Nature - The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through January 13, 2013 -

"Rinpa" is a modern term that refers to a distinctive style of Japanese pictorial and applied arts that arose in the early seventeenth century and has continued through modern times. Literally meaning "school of Korin," Rinpa derives its name from Ogata Korin (1658-1716), a celebrated painter from Kyoto. It embraces art marked by a bold, graphic abbreviation of natural motifs, frequent reference to traditional court literature and poetry, the lavish use of expensive mineral and metallic pigments, incorporation of calligraphy into painting compositions, and innovative experimentation with new brush techniques. The exhibition will feature more than one hundred brilliantly executed works of art created in Japan by the Rinpa-school artists. It will be held in two rotations, the first opening on May 26, 2012; the second on September 12, 2012. Highlighting the school's most prominent proponents, this two-part presentation will trace the development of the Rinpa aesthetic and will demonstrate how its style continued to influence artists throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Comprising more than fifty works from the Museum's own holdings supplemented by forty-five loans from public and private collections on the east coast, the exhibition will include many masters' renowned works in a variety of media: painting, textiles, lacquerware, and ceramics.

Candid - The Rubin Museum
Through January 14, 2013 - New York

Homai Vyarawalla (1913-2012) was India's first female photojournalist. This exhibition, the first on Vyarawalla outside of India, will present her photography from the late 1930s to 1970, and narrate her extraordinary life with a biographical film and ephemera from her career. From early in her career, Homai Vyarawalla documented key events from the generation around Independence, including the historic meeting of Gandhi and the Congress Committee on the 1947 plan for partition, and she recorded the visits to India of world leaders and dignitaries including Queen Elizabeth, Jacqueline Kennedy, Ho Chi Minh, and Zhou Enlai. She was revered in India and her recent death at age 98 generated tributes around the world. The exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Alkazi Foundation for the Arts in New Delhi.

Picasso Black and White - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Through January 23, 2013 - New York

Picasso Black and White marks the first major exhibition to focus on the recurrent motif of black and white throughout Pablo Picasso's career. Surveying his oeuvre from 1904 to 1971, Picasso Black and White examines the artist's lifelong exploration of a black-and-white palette through approximately 115 paintings and a selection of sculptures and works on paper. The exhibition thematically traces the artist's unique vision throughout his work, including early monochromatic blue and rose paintings, gray-toned Cubist canvases, elegant and austere neoclassical portraits and nudes, Surrealist-inspired figures, forceful and somber scenes depicting the atrocities of war, allegorical still lifes, vivid interpretations of art-historical masterpieces, and the electric, highly sexualized canvases of Picasso's last years. The exhibition includes significant loans drawn from private collections, including many from the Picasso family; from museums across Europe and the United States; and from numerous public and private European and American collections, many of which have not been exhibited or published before. The exhibition is organized by Carmen Gimenez, Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of Twentieth-Century Art, with assistance from Karole Vail, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Picasso Black and White is sponsored by Bank of America. Major support is provided by the Picasso Black and White Leadership Committee, with Christina and Robert C. Baker, Chairs; Acquavella Galleries; J. Ira and Nicki Harris Foundation; The Lauder Foundation-Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund; Phyllis and William Mack; Stephen and Nan Swid; and Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed. Additional support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, and the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Born Out of Necessity - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through January 28, 2013 - Midtown

Showcasing objects that adhere to the traditional view of design as a tool for problem-solving, Born out of Necessity offers close examination of the problems themselves -- whether urgent, foreseen, or imagined. From objects that respond to pressing needs in developing countries to new solutions that are tailored to the urban environment, the exhibition examines how design intervenes across a range of experiences, including medical emergencies and natural disasters. Other objects demonstrate how products created to address specific challenges for people with disabilities can provide solutions that improve everyone's life. Drawing on the narrative power of design, Born out of Necessity addresses a host of complex cultural developments, such as the need to incorporate environmental responsibility in everyday life, our attempts to marry ancient religious beliefs with contemporary mores, and the desire to anticipate and prevent technological and ecological quagmires.

New Photography 2012 - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 04, 2013 - Midtown

New Photography 2012 presents five artists -- Michele Abeles, Birdhead (Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), Anne Collier, Zoe Crosher, and Shirana Shahbazi -- whose varied techniques and backgrounds represent the diversity and vitality of photography today.

Nature and the American Vision: The Hudson River School - New-York Historical Society
Through February 21, 2013 - New York

After a national tour, the forty-five iconic works, including Thomas Cole's five-part series The Course of Empire and other masterworks by Cole, John F. Kensett, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper F. Cropsey, Asher B. Durand and others will once again be on display at the New-York Historical Society.

The Shaping of New Visions: Photography, Film, Photobook - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through April 29, 2013 - Midtown

This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography's role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements -- with a special emphasis on the medium's relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and Post-Conceptual art -- and in the development of contemporary artistic practices. The shaping of what came to be known as "New Vision" photography bore the obvious influence of "lens-based" and "time-based" works. El Lissitzky best summarized its ethos: "The new world will not need little pictures," he wrote in The Conquest of Art (1922). "If it needs a mirror, it has the photograph and the cinema." Bringing together over 250 works from MoMA's collection, the exhibition features major projects by Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Germaine Krull, Gerhard Ruhm, Helen Levitt, Daido Moriyama, Robert Heinecken, Ed Ruscha, Martha Rosler, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip-Lorca DiCorcia, and Walid Raad, among others. Photographic history is presented as a multivalent history of distinct "new visions," rooted in unconventional and innovative exercises that range from photograms and photomontages to experimental films and photobooks.

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter! - American Museum of Natural History
Through May 28, 2013 - Upper West Side

The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter!, a perennial favorite visited by millions of children and adults, returns to the American Museum of Natural History. This popular winter attraction invites visitors to mingle with up to 500 iridescent butterflies fluttering among blooming tropical flowers and lush green vegetation inside a free-standing, balmy, 1,200-square-foot enclosure.

Aesthetic Ambitions: Edward Lycett and Brooklyn's Faience Manufacturing Company - Brooklyn Museum
Through June 16, 2013 -

This exhibition highlights the nearly fifty-year career of ceramicist Edward Lycett (American, 1833-1910), creative director of the Faience Manufacturing Company from 1884 to 1890. The range of works illustrates Lycett's talent and adaptability to stylistic changes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as his vision for Faience, a company based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, that earned acclaim for producing ornamental wares that introduced a new standard of excellence in American ceramics. These bold and eclectic pieces synthesized Japanese, Chinese, and Islamic influences characteristic of the Aesthetic movement and were sold in the United States' foremost art ware emporiums, including Tiffany & Company. Among the ceramics on view are 39 Faience pieces, including a number of large-scale vases. Also on view are Lycett's formula books, family photographs, and other ephemera; rare examples of ceramic works by his three sons; and other Brooklyn-made ceramics from the Museum�s collection.

WINGED TAPESTRIES: MOTHS AT LARGE - American Museum of Natural History
Through September 29, 2013 -

Winged Tapestries: Moths at Large, an exhibition of 34 striking images featuring dramatic images of moths, opens at AMNH. On view in the IMAX Corridor on the first floor, the exhibition displays the arresting beauty and surprising diversity of moths from Ottawa-based photographer Jim des Rivières. "Moths are beautiful, and in many respects prettier than butterflies," says exhibition curator David Grimaldi, curator, Division of Invertebrate Zoology. "In this show, we have macro or relatively large moths. They're gorgeous." Primitive moths appeared about 195 million years ago, whereas the oldest butterfly fossil is about 55 million years old. And today, moths outnumber butterflies 15 to 1, with approximately 150,000 described species of moths worldwide, compared to 10,000 butterfly species.

Gateway to Himalayan Art - The Rubin Museum
Through January 06, 2014 - New York

Marking the first in a series of yearly rotations, nearly twenty works of art add new dimensions and context to Gateway to Himalayan Art. Visitors will notice a greater emphasis on Hindu works, with beautiful examples from India and Nepal ranging from 12th to 19th centuries, as well as intricately-detailed thangka paintings, manuscript pages, and textiles. In every iteration, Gateway acquaints new and long-time friends of the museum with the principal concepts of Himalayan art, including important deities and symbols, the materials and techniques used in creating works of art, and the purposes and functions of these works in their sacred and secular contexts. And don't forget to pick up your Gateway Looking Guide to help you identify important figures and symbols throughout the museum. It's yours to keep.

Contemporary Art from the Collection - Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Through February 17, 2014 - Midtown

Reinstalled to continue the historical sequence found on MoMA's fifth (1880-1940) and fourth (1940-1980) floors, the galleries on the second floor will begin with art of the early 1980s and extend to the present moment, interweaving works in all mediums. Individual galleries will focus on particular topics, ranging from specific locales that nourished influential groups of artists to key strategies shared by diverse practitioners of the same generation. Others will display a single significant installation or artist's project. Like the fifth- and fourth-floor galleries, the second-floor galleries will be periodically reinstalled to reflect the depth and richness of the Museum's collection, and to allow for varying approaches to the wide variety of art produced during the last 30 years. Featured artists include Ashley Bickerton, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring, Martin Kippenberger, Steve McQueen, Senga Nengudi, Doris Salcedo, Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Rosemarie Trockel.

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